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Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

 


Wolfgirl22 wrote:

Hey, I'm Jessica =)

 

I am not a new BN user, I actually had this account for a while now, but the only book club i have been going to is the Teen Reads, since I'm only 17......ok, I lied. I'm 16, but i will be 17 in 2 more weeks. I just wanna start saying that i am 17 =)

 

I really love Shakespear......but I'm not sure why, I just really do.


 

 

Wolfgirl -- Oh, the joy of being young enough to want to be older than one really is!  Savor these days -- and may you recall them with fondness in another fifty or sixty + years!

 

Look forward to your comments on Shakespeare.  He is a preference that you can savor for a fifetime.

 

Pepper

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!


Wolfgirl22 wrote:

Hey, I'm Jessica =)

 

I am not a new BN user, I actually had this account for a while now, but the only book club i have been going to is the Teen Reads, since I'm only 17......ok, I lied. I'm 16, but i will be 17 in 2 more weeks. I just wanna start saying that i am 17 =)

 

I really love Shakespear......but I'm not sure why, I just really do.


 

Hey, Jessica!  It's great to have you with us!   Do you have a favorite Shakespeare play?  ( and Happy Birthday a little early!).  ;D

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Correspondent
Wolfgirl22
Posts: 180
Registered: ‎04-21-2009
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Thanks ConnieK.

 

And since I haven't read that many Shakespeare book, so far my fav has been Romeo & Juleit. After that I wanted to read some more of his work but I don't know what to read

http://psykhe22.blogspot.com/
http://psykhe22-challenge.blogspot.com/

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

[ Edited ]

 


Wolfgirl22 wrote:

Thanks ConnieK.

 

And since I haven't read that many Shakespeare book, so far my fav has been Romeo & Juleit. After that I wanted to read some more of his work but I don't know what to read


Wolfgirl -- Connie, as a teacher, will probably have some better suggestions.  But, as a young person, some of my favorite lines were from Portia, in The Merchant of Venice:  "The quality of mercy is not strained.  It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven...."  Critics argue whether the story is anti-Semitic; as a teenager, I didn't recognize the significance of Shylock's faith.  Today, you would probably be much more aware of those aspects of the story.

 

 

If you like history, consider one of his historical plays. Julius Caesar is often included in curricula at the high school level in the U.S., perhaps because he is better known here than the English kings. "Et tu. Brute?" has entered our language for sad recognition of the traitor.

 

Of the tragedies, we should all encounter Hamlet at some time in our lives.  I think it is quite readable and understanable.  There are also several good DVDs available, so you might enjoy watching one as well.  King Lear is considered one of Shakespeare's greatest plays by many, but I found I needed to be older to appreciate it.  I enjoyed reciting Lady Macbeth in Macbeth; a chance to look at the dark side ("Out damned spot, OUT I say!).  Also, there is the wonderful witches' brew.

 

You might enjoy the rolicking fun of the comedies.  In college, I had fun playing Mistress Quickly in the Merry Wives of Windsor, although MWoW is far from Shakespeare's best play.  Falstaff is a character you will want to get to know (also in Henry IV, as companion to Prince Hal, Henry V), partly because he is referred to so many other places in literature  Several of the comedies delight in mistaken entities, which was particularly appropriate when all the parts were acted by men, as they were at that time.  I find that makes them more delightful and less confusing to watch than read.  If a local theatre (it doesn't have to be an expensive one or an elaborate production) is performing a Shakespearean play, I do suggest trying to attend.  Some of the more obscure plays in Shakespeare's oeuvre were introduced to me in such a memorable evening -- even if the play was somewhat gruesome, like Titus Andronicus.  (A play makes an interesting date or different night out with friends.)  I enjoy modern adaptations as well as productions with the original lines.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Wolfgirl22
Posts: 180
Registered: ‎04-21-2009
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Peppermill -

 

Thank you for the many choices. I remember reading Julius Caeser in 10th grade and I thought that it was a really good play to act out. I liked reading from Brute because I got to be Caeser's best firend/enemy closer in the end.

 

I will definatly be looking up a lot of these so I can get a head start on reading them. Isn't there a play called A Midsummer's Night Dream or something? Do you know what that is about?

http://psykhe22.blogspot.com/
http://psykhe22-challenge.blogspot.com/

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

[ Edited ]

 


Wolfgirl22 wrote:

Peppermill -

 

Thank you for the many choices. I remember reading Julius Caeser in 10th grade and I thought that it was a really good play to act out. I liked reading from Brute because I got to be Caeser's best firend/enemy closer in the end.

 

I will definatly be looking up a lot of these so I can get a head start on reading them. Isn't there a play called A Midsummer's Night Dream or something? Do you know what that is about?


 

 

Wolfgirl -- I just lost my response to you, so this reconstruction will be shorter.  I should have known enough to have saved it first, since this had happened to me three previous times today!  Grr...rr!

 

A Midsummer's Night Dream is a lot of fun.  I saw a modern adaptation of it at a professional theater about a year ago.  It is one of those plays that I referred to as confusing to read because it has so many mistaken identities.  But, if it appeals, try it.  Thankfully, not all minds work alike.

 

For a synopsis of the plot, try this Wikipedia description.   If it seems too long or complicated, do a Google search on the name of the play.  There will be several choices available. Puck is one of the memorable characters that, like Falstaff, you will find many places once you get to know him.

 

For a list of all Shakespeare's plays, try his Wikipedia entry under Works. If you have a good library system, you can probably borrow DVDs or audio versions of those that you would like to explore.  (You don't have to listen to the whole thing if you discover you'd rather try something else instead.)

 

I'm glad you know and enjoyed Julius Caesar.  I think "playing" one of the roles is a fun way of getting closer to these plays.

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

[ Edited ]

Wolfgirl22 wrote:

Peppermill -

 

Thank you for the many choices. I remember reading Julius Caeser in 10th grade and I thought that it was a really good play to act out. I liked reading from Brute because I got to be Caeser's best firend/enemy closer in the end.

 

I will definatly be looking up a lot of these so I can get a head start on reading them. Isn't there a play called A Midsummer's Night Dream or something? Do you know what that is about?


 

Wolfgirl22--Thanks to Pepper for her suggestions to you.  I always recommend to readers asking for suggestions of books of any kind that they pick up titles they've heard of and want to know more about.  That's always a good place to start, I think.

 

If you've heard of MIDSUMMER, then that would be a good one.  It's a delightful play! 

 

I might also suggest that if the language keeps you from understanding the plot, to pick up a copy of the play that has a present-day kind of reading on one side and Shakespeare's lines on the other side.  It's very helpful the first time around when you're new to a play.

 

Here's one for MSND:

 

A Midsummer Night's Dream (Shakespeare Made Easy Series) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's not "cheating" to use these -- if you read both sides of the pages!

 

Another helpful tip for beginning reading more Shakespeare is to listen to audio book versions.  The actors' voices help you get the meaning.  For example, if an actor whispers a line or shouts it; sounds angry or playful; mocking, etc.  We get a lot of meaning from vocal expression.  This often helps with Shakespeare's "jokes."  Readers often miss them on the page, but our ears pick up on sarcasm, etc., so the actors' portrayals of the lines help us "hear" them.

 

Good luck with whatever you decide!

 

 

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
New User
Angellica
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎04-13-2010
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi, I'm known as V, though my penname says Angellica.

(It's inspired from Angellica Bianca, a "cameo" of Aphra Behn in The Rover)

I'm 21 years old, soon to be 22.

I study Creative Writing in Montreal.

No, I'm not communist.

 

I am on the verge of completing a 6 credit Shakespeare course.

I own the complete works of Shakespeare in the Norton Anthologies version.

My favorite plays to date are Measure for Measure (the play that destroys comedy), Coriolanus, and A Midsummer Night's Dream.

 

While studying for my Shakespeare exam,

I thought this place would be a productive part of my procrastination.

 

 

I love Harold Bloom.

 

Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Angellica wrote:

Hi, I'm known as V, though my penname says Angellica.

(It's inspired from Angellica Bianca, a "cameo" of Aphra Behn in The Rover)

I'm 21 years old, soon to be 22.

I study Creative Writing in Montreal.

No, I'm not communist.

 

I am on the verge of completing a 6 credit Shakespeare course.

I own the complete works of Shakespeare in the Norton Anthologies version.

My favorite plays to date are Measure for Measure (the play that destroys comedy), Coriolanus, and A Midsummer Night's Dream.

 

While studying for my Shakespeare exam,

I thought this place would be a productive part of my procrastination.

 

 

I love Harold Bloom.

 

 

Welcome, Angellica!  I like your thought - coming here as you procrastinate, but at least it being in the neighborhood as you study for your exam! 

 

We'd enjoy hearing anything you care to add to our discussions!  Hop right in!

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Correspondent
b00kwerm
Posts: 184
Registered: ‎11-29-2009
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi all!!

 

I love Shakespeare's works! I did several reports on his life for school. I have read Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Hamlet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Twelfth Night. I want to read Much Ado About Nothing and Julius Caesar. Occasionally, I get confused by the language, but then I just ask people for help. =]

Does anyone have any more recommendations for me?

Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

b00kwerm wrote:

Hi all!!

 

I love Shakespeare's works! I did several reports on his life for school. I have read Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Hamlet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Twelfth Night. I want to read Much Ado About Nothing and Julius Caesar. Occasionally, I get confused by the language, but then I just ask people for help. =]

Does anyone have any more recommendations for me?

 

Welcome, b00kwerm!  Boy - just about anything that interests you would be good to delve into - of the 2 you mention, I know Julius Caesar is often read in school, so it might be good to be acquainted with that one!

~ConnieAnnKirk




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