Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

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We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Not too late at all -- we don't start the discussion officially until Tuesday, but the threads are already up, so it's fair game to start posting anytime.

 

Welcome to the discussion!

 


StevePerk1 wrote:

Hello all,

 

I hope it isn't too late to join the Macbeth discussion group.  I coincidentally happened to start reading it just last week and I know I would benefit greatly from people's thoughts and comments.  I love to read and have always loved Shakespeare.  It's always amazed me how something so presumably dusty and old can be so rich, vital and engaging with a little work invested on my part! 

 

As for me, I'm an electrical engineer living in the Los Angeles area.  My job, wife and two kids (4 and 2) don't leave me a whole lot of time to read (or probably post), but I'd sure love to hang around and participate as much as I can.

 

--Steve


 

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Read Shakespeare to your kids, Steve. That's what my father did for me when I was just a tyke. And welcome!

 


StevePerk1 wrote:

Hello all,

 

I hope it isn't too late to join the Macbeth discussion group.  I coincidentally happened to start reading it just last week and I know I would benefit greatly from people's thoughts and comments.  I love to read and have always loved Shakespeare.  It's always amazed me how something so presumably dusty and old can be so rich, vital and engaging with a little work invested on my part! 

 

As for me, I'm an electrical engineer living in the Los Angeles area.  My job, wife and two kids (4 and 2) don't leave me a whole lot of time to read (or probably post), but I'd sure love to hang around and participate as much as I can.

 

--Steve


 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Welcome, Steve! 

 

You're not late at all.  We're just starting Macbeth today!  Please feel free to join in any time you're able.

 

~ConnieK

 


StevePerk1 wrote:

Hello all,

 

I hope it isn't too late to join the Macbeth discussion group.  I coincidentally happened to start reading it just last week and I know I would benefit greatly from people's thoughts and comments.  I love to read and have always loved Shakespeare.  It's always amazed me how something so presumably dusty and old can be so rich, vital and engaging with a little work invested on my part! 

 

As for me, I'm an electrical engineer living in the Los Angeles area.  My job, wife and two kids (4 and 2) don't leave me a whole lot of time to read (or probably post), but I'd sure love to hang around and participate as much as I can.

 

--Steve


 

 
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi, I'm Denise.  This is the first play I'm reading with this group, but I've participated in other groups at B&N, even back in the old BNU days.  I'm a computer programmer and I live in MA with my two cats Romeo and Khan.

 

I haven't read any Shakespeare for years, but I've never read Macbeth before, and figured that I should.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

A hearty welcome to you, Denise!  We're thrilled to have you with us for Macbeth.  Jump right in any time!

 

~ConnieK

 

 


dulcinea3 wrote:

Hi, I'm Denise.  This is the first play I'm reading with this group, but I've participated in other groups at B&N, even back in the old BNU days.  I'm a computer programmer and I live in MA with my two cats Romeo and Khan.

 

I haven't read any Shakespeare for years, but I've never read Macbeth before, and figured that I should.


 

 

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Reader 2
Mosquito52
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎09-29-2008
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

I am Bernie Rhoades from the Nashville, Tennessee area.  I read Macbeth in high school some 40 yrs ago.  Really interested in seeing what I have learned and see what opens up since my first reading.
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Here's a warm welcome to you, Bernie!  It's always a treat to hear new impressions from rereaders of the plays.  That's what many of the members here are, but we have first-time readers, too.  Jump into the discussion at any time.  :smileyhappy:

 

~ConnieK

 


Mosquito52 wrote:
I am Bernie Rhoades from the Nashville, Tennessee area.  I read Macbeth in high school some 40 yrs ago.  Really interested in seeing what I have learned and see what opens up since my first reading.

 

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Frequent Contributor
mildone
Posts: 84
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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mildone

I was hospitalized for a long time and previous to this illness I was a long time participant of the Book Club. I am back but only as a reader of those wonderful comments made by those intellectual participants. It is difficult for me to type, spell, construct logical ideas but I am eager to learn. I have serious limitations as a contributor but I  am very happy just being healthy and happy again.

mildone

Melissa_W
Posts: 4,124
Topics: 516
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Blog Posts: 3
Ideas: 15
Solutions: 33
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Wecome back :)

It's good to have you back.  I hope your health continues to improve :smileyhappy:
Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: mildone

Health is certainly issue #1, mildone--I hope reading the clubs gives you some comfort and enjoyment while you continue to recover.  Take care of yourself, and feel free to type in a post whenever you can and wish to do so!

 

~ConnieK

 

 


mildone wrote:

I was hospitalized for a long time and previous to this illness I was a long time participant of the Book Club. I am back but only as a reader of those wonderful comments made by those intellectual participants. It is difficult for me to type, spell, construct logical ideas but I am eager to learn. I have serious limitations as a contributor but I  am very happy just being healthy and happy again.

mildone


 

 
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Distinguished Wordsmith
maxcat
Posts: 4,012
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi, I'm maxcat and I've never read "The Taming of the Shrew". It is interesting and I'm about halfway thru the book.
The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!


maxcat wrote:
Hi, I'm maxcat and I've never read "The Taming of the Shrew". It is interesting and I'm about halfway thru the book.

 

Terrific, maxcat!  Welcome!  It'll be great to hear your thoughts.

 

~ConnieK

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Frequent Contributor
emeraldisle
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎09-26-2008
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi. I'm Mary and always have loved Taming of the Shrew, so I'm excited to join this group. I've been in the First Look Book Club discussion lately and find this a nice contrast.
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!


emeraldisle wrote:
Hi. I'm Mary and always have loved Taming of the Shrew, so I'm excited to join this group. I've been in the First Look Book Club discussion lately and find this a nice contrast.

 

Welcome, Mary!  It will be great to hear more about why you like Shrew so well.  Jump into any of the threads at any time!

 

~ConnieK

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
New User
ohkimmykay
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎11-17-2008
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi!

i'm ohkimmykay. I'm a freshman in college pursuing a degree in english.

i'm an aspiring writer, and i love to read :smileyvery-happy:

i'm really excited about reading Shakespeare, he's a favorite of mine, and i hope to learn lots from the discussions :smileyhappy:

Frequent Contributor
GregBauder
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎11-16-2008
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Hi. I am a Shakespeare fan ever since I took a course in his plays during my BA in English many years ago. I have never joined a book club although I belong to a writers'group. I also love Milton and I remember my professor saying: "Shakespeare knew everything. Then, Milton was the last person to know everything.

Because he'd read everything." I was wondering if any of you had heard of Shakespeare's influence in the

King James version of The Bible? Our professor told us that Shakespeare was born in 1564. When the King James Bible was translated in 1610 there were about 60 scholars who translated it. Since Shakespeare was obviously the greatest and most admired writer they put in Psalm 46, 46 words from the beginning of it the word "shake"; then 46 words from the bottom of Psalm 46 the word "spear". Shakespeare was 46 in 1610. Many people have been astounded by this. I believe it was a deliberate tribute to Shakespeare. Milton, who said Shakespeare was "fancy's child" believed Shakespeare was the most imaginative of all poets and Milton had a photographic memory and knew every book by heart. It's

always a thrill for me to discuss Shakespeare.

Greg Bauder has a BA in English and has had five books published about schizophrenia, a disease he's had for 31 years.
Contributor
Conrad_Jalowski
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎11-16-2008
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Greetings, I am an eighteen (18) year old college student at Molloy College. My major is in Byzantine history and my minor is German philosophy. At heart, I am a Platonist (as opposed to Aristotelianism) and a Hegelian (the two philosophies to which I strongly adhere to). I am also passionate on Ciceronian, Machiavellian and Thucydidean studies as well as the philosophies of Hugo Grotius, Immanuel Wallenstein, Immanuel Kant, Schelling, Locke, Montesquieu, Hobbes and Fichte among many others. I am also passionate of the intellectual movement of Romanticism such as of Walter Savage Landor, William Blake, William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Friedrich von Schiller among many others. I am obsessed with the great collapse of the Roman Empire as one of unprecedented of falls (I study in my free time the theories of Edward Gibbon, Pirenne's Thesis, the Late Antiquity Theory as emendations on the dilapidation and ultimate collapse of Rome). I have read Polybius, Titus Livy, Sallustius Crispus, Ammianus Marcellinus, Procopius for latin literature, and I am currently reading Desiderius Erasmus' Ciceronianus or on The Ideal Latin Style of Cicero.

 

As for William Shakespeare, I admire two works above all else: The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and the Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra. The first representing the hubristic personage of one man who like Catiline tore asunder the Roman Republic for despotic means and voluptuous pleasure which is ineffable whilst the second comments on the despotic Triumvirate, the fall of Marcus Aemilius Lepidus and the histrionic character of Cleopatra VII and the effeminacy of Mark Antony. As for the poetry and sonnets of William Shakespeare, I prefer the Petrarchan sonnet and the Spenserian sonnet to his own.

 

I am honored to be a part of the Barns and Noble online book discussion forums. 

"A World-Historical individual is devoted to the One Aim, regardless of all else. It is even possible that such men may treat other great, even sacred interests inconsiderately; conduct which is indeed obnoxious to moral reprehension. But so mighty a form must trample down many an innocent flower or crush to pieces many an object in its path."

From G.W.F. Hegel, Philosophy of History in Jacob Loewenberg (ed.), Hegel: Selections (New York: C. Scribner's Sons, 1929), pp. 376-80.
Frequent Contributor
GregBauder
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎11-16-2008
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!

Wow, Conrad. For 18 you're well read. I love the Romantic poets you mentioned as well as Coleridge and Keats. It may interest you to know that Wordsworth ( who according to the great scholar Northrup Frye

cherished Milton as did every 18th century Romantic writer ) waited his entire life for the reincarnation of Milton. William Blake believed Milton was the reincarnation of Jesus Christ and wrote the poem "Milton"

believing he was the reincarnation of Milton.Wordsworth met the little known Blake and read his "Songs Of

Innocence and Experience" as well as "The Four Zoas", his prophecies about Europe and America and his masterpiece "Jerusalem". Wordsworth thought Blake was a madman but made more sense to him than his bitter rival Lord Byron. It wasn't until nearly a century later that scholars came across the obscure

Blake whose work became famous posthumously. But, Wordsworth should have known better. It is widely believed that John Keats who died at 26 would have been the greatest writer ever had he lived a lot longer.

He was a Romantic who wrote his five great odes and a book "On Milton" before he got sick and stopped writing at age 24. Milton aided Oliver Cromwell in bringing down King Charles I which caused a domino effect through Europe and Milton heavily influenced The U.S.Constitution especially with the greatest

prose piece and polemic ever written:" Aereopagitica". The U.S. intellectuals and politicians interpreted

Milton's supreme epic "Paradise Lost" as fuel to fight the British. Milton's 17th century ideas of free will, freedom of speech, the necessity to allow divorce, the need to always keep church and government

separate, the corruption of the clergy, the need for popular culture and banning hateful or pornographic material made him the world's greatest and most influential writer along with Shakespeare. He is the most

difficult writer to understand and his companion poems ( He was blind and relied on his memory for most

of his works ) "L'Allegro" and "Il Penseroso" were full of beautiful images and metaphors but simply went over every critic and scholar's head. Writer/Critics like S.T. Coleridge and T.S. Eliot could not "mine the

ore" of these poems. What I find strange is that the two greatest writers ever are shrouded in mystery.

Dr. Samuel Jonson was critical of Shakespeare and Milton because of this. As for The Roman Empire

there was a lot of religious dogma and corruption that laid the groundwork for The Roman Catholic Church

which was one of the most evil entities in history. I despised many Roman leaders like Nero, Caligula and even Constantine and instead admired the Greeks especially, Plato, Socrates, Euripides, Homer, Sappho,

Aristophanes, Aeschylus, Sophocles and other writer/philosophers. I did like Lucretius' "On The Nature Of

The Universe" and other Roman writers like Horace ( who Milton liked ), Pindar and Machiavelli's "The Prince" which was a philosophical treatise on the corruption of politicians.An idea he had in common with Shakespeare and Milton. I took philosophy and while some of the thinkers like Plato, DesCartes, Mills and

St. Thomas Acquinas were the few I related to and liked I despised empiricists like Locke, as well as

existentialists like Camus and Sartre. I hated Neitsczhe although I have to admit he was misrepresented by the Nazis. I have no respect for the nazi poet Ezra Pound, who can stuff his Cantos, original as they may be. As for female authors I like Margaret Atwood, Emily Dickinson, Jane Austen, Margaret Laurence

and Sylvia Plath. But I'll stop here as I've probably put some people to sleep.   -Greg B.

Greg Bauder has a BA in English and has had five books published about schizophrenia, a disease he's had for 31 years.
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!


ohkimmykay wrote:

Hi!

i'm ohkimmykay. I'm a freshman in college pursuing a degree in english.

i'm an aspiring writer, and i love to read :smileyvery-happy:

i'm really excited about reading Shakespeare, he's a favorite of mine, and i hope to learn lots from the discussions :smileyhappy:


 

Welcome, ohkimmykay!  We're glad to have you.  Jump in any time.  We are currently featuring a discussion on Taming of the Shrew.  Next month we will be talking about Love's Labor's Lost.  You're welcome to start or add to any other threads about the bard as well.

 

EnJOY!

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Introduce Yourself Here!


GregBauder wrote:

Hi. I am a Shakespeare fan ever since I took a course in his plays during my BA in English many years ago. I have never joined a book club although I belong to a writers'group. I also love Milton and I remember my professor saying: "Shakespeare knew everything. Then, Milton was the last person to know everything.

Because he'd read everything." I was wondering if any of you had heard of Shakespeare's influence in the

King James version of The Bible? Our professor told us that Shakespeare was born in 1564. When the King James Bible was translated in 1610 there were about 60 scholars who translated it. Since Shakespeare was obviously the greatest and most admired writer they put in Psalm 46, 46 words from the beginning of it the word "shake"; then 46 words from the bottom of Psalm 46 the word "spear". Shakespeare was 46 in 1610. Many people have been astounded by this. I believe it was a deliberate tribute to Shakespeare. Milton, who said Shakespeare was "fancy's child" believed Shakespeare was the most imaginative of all poets and Milton had a photographic memory and knew every book by heart. It's

always a thrill for me to discuss Shakespeare.


 

Welcome, Greg!  I never heard that story about Psalm 46 from the King James Bible and Shakespeare!  I wonder if anyone else here has.  I'm glad to see you jumping right into the discussion!

 

 

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
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