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mercygrey
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
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New Book Club member, and new teacher

Hello. I am a special education teacher for middle and high school English. I am a "late bloomer", going into teaching at 40 - this is my first year. I've been having a great year so far (we've read works like Of Mice & Men, Sounder). But I've been wanting to fit in Shakespeare the last 9 weeks. My regular ed. teacher down the hall recommended Summer's Night, so this is a wonderful opportunity for me! I am extremely interested in any suggestions on teaching strategies for special education & Shakespeare - easier books (wording) for my lower students, CD's that use easier vocabulary. Don't misunderstand me, I want to keep as much of the shakespearian lanugage and structure, but sometimes I need to explain in more detail than a regular education class would.
Any suggestions would be appreciated. I am picking up my copy tomorrow, and look forward to participating in this forum. Thank you.

Tina
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LibbyLane
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: New Book Club member, and new teacher

Brave soul! Adapting Shakespeare for special education English is a major challenge. I've sat in on a few special education English classes at the high school level, and I've seen how well the kids can do with a teacher who's willing to push & challenge them. I'll ask the teacher I sat in with if he has any tips to pass on (he has a theatre background, too).

Best of luck,
Elizabeth
Melissa_W
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: New Book Club member, and new teacher

At our BN (I'm a bookseller), we usually recommend a "No-Fear" Shakespeare from Sparknotes if a customer thinks he/she needs a bit of a boost. Each play (Sonnets, too) is published in a 2 page format - the original on one side and the facing page has a modern English version, definitions, etc, and the print is larger than some editions. I hear good things about No-Fear from people who easily get tripped up by "Shakespeare English." :smileyhappy:



mercygrey wrote:
Hello. I am a special education teacher for middle and high school English. I am a "late bloomer", going into teaching at 40 - this is my first year. I've been having a great year so far (we've read works like Of Mice & Men, Sounder). But I've been wanting to fit in Shakespeare the last 9 weeks. My regular ed. teacher down the hall recommended Summer's Night, so this is a wonderful opportunity for me! I am extremely interested in any suggestions on teaching strategies for special education & Shakespeare - easier books (wording) for my lower students, CD's that use easier vocabulary. Don't misunderstand me, I want to keep as much of the shakespearian lanugage and structure, but sometimes I need to explain in more detail than a regular education class would.
Any suggestions would be appreciated. I am picking up my copy tomorrow, and look forward to participating in this forum. Thank you.

Tina


Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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