Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Happy Hauntings


StevePerk1 wrote:

Happy Halloween to all.  Hope all your fires burn and cauldrons bubble!  Say hello to Banquo for me if you see him.

 

:smileysurprised:

 

--Steve


 

Ha, Steve.  No Banquo showed up, thankfully, but we had some cute little chickens and Snow Whites!  I love the littlest ones the best.

 

Happy November!

 

~ConnieK

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: OT (Off-Topic) Chatroom: "The Boar's Head Tavern"

To our American members--

 

How were the lines at your voting place today?

 

~ConnieK

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: OT (Off-Topic) Chatroom: "The Boar's Head Tavern"

We are getting good coverage of your election on UK TV and I saw all the queues at your polling stations.  I hope that the weather keeps fine and that older folks got their postal votes set up.  I will be up all night biting my nails with y'all!

 

 

 


ConnieK wrote:

To our American members--

 

How were the lines at your voting place today?

 

~ConnieK


 

Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: OT (Off-Topic) Chatroom: "The Boar's Head Tavern"

I mailed my ballot in a couple of weeks ago.

 


ConnieK wrote:

To our American members--

 

How were the lines at your voting place today?

 

~ConnieK


 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: OT (Off-Topic) Chatroom: "The Boar's Head Tavern" -- U.S. Election

We live in a rural voting area at the edge of a small town in New York State.  I went to vote around 9 a.m., hoping to miss the peak times of 6-8; noon; and after 5.  The wait here at mid-morning was about 20 minutes--not bad.  The atmosphere was festive.  People were clearly ready, eager, and excited to cast their votes.  Good to see young voters there, too.  Wonderful to see a good turnout! 

 

Voting gives you a good feeling!

 

Don't forget to vote!!!

 

~ConnieK

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: OT (Off-Topic) Chatroom: "The Boar's Head Tavern" - U.S. Election

[ Edited ]

Choisya wrote:

We are getting good coverage of your election on UK TV and I saw all the queues at your polling stations.  I hope that the weather keeps fine and that older folks got their postal votes set up.  I will be up all night biting my nails with y'all!


Thanks for your support, Choisya!  This election cycle seems to have gone on forever here (almost 2 years of campaign news).  It feels good to finally have our say in it all (again, after the primaries).

 

~ConnieK

Message Edited by ConnieK on 11-04-2008 10:02 AM
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
0 Kudos

Re: OT (Off-Topic) Chatroom: "The Boar's Head Tavern" - U.S. Election

Well since the polls opened at 6 am we thought we'd go early and show up at 5:45. We had to wait a hour in the foggy rainy dark just to get in the building, the lines were that long. Only time in my life it ever took 2 hours to vote. This election might just set voting records.
Contributor
StevePerk1
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

World's Greatest Writers

Shakespeare was arguably the greatest writer in the English language.  (I say "arguably" only to be polite.  We all know it's not arguable...   :smileywink:)  Who would you say are the pinnacles of other languages?  Here are some of my suggestions, which, in this case, are extremely arguable!

 

French:  Victor Hugo

Russian:  Leo Tolstoy (I expect lots of critques on that one!)

Spanish:  Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra 

German:  Johann Wolfgang Göthe

What are your picks?  (And, yes, if you do want to argue with my Shakespeare assertion, I'd love to hear your alternative.)

 

--Steve

Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers

Are you rating them in the use of language or as tellers of stories Steve? 

 


StevePerk1 wrote:

Shakespeare was arguably the greatest writer in the English language.  (I say "arguably" only to be polite.  We all know it's not arguable...   :smileywink:)  Who would you say are the pinnacles of other languages?  Here are some of my suggestions, which, in this case, are extremely arguable!

 

French:  Victor Hugo

Russian:  Leo Tolstoy (I expect lots of critques on that one!)

Spanish:  Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra 

German:  Johann Wolfgang Göthe

What are your picks?  (And, yes, if you do want to argue with my Shakespeare assertion, I'd love to hear your alternative.)

 

--Steve


 

Contributor
StevePerk1
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers

I guess I didn't have any real criteria in mind, but I could see how you could get distinctly different answers depending on how you approached it.  I will rephrase it this way:  for Language X, it there a package deal - someone who exceeds all others in both beauty and artistry in the language itself, and who also manages to spin a fascinating story?  If there is no clear stand-out, I would opt for beauty of language, because a beautiful rendering of the language can salvage a banal story, but a great story suffers significantly from a lack of linguistic artistry.

 

How's that?

 


Choisya wrote:

 

Are you rating them in the use of language or as tellers of stories Steve? 

 


StevePerk1 wrote:

Shakespeare was arguably the greatest writer in the English language.  (I say "arguably" only to be polite.  We all know it's not arguable... )  Who would you say are the pinnacles of other languages?  Here are some of my suggestions, which, in this case, are extremely arguable!

 

French:  Victor Hugo

Russian:  Leo Tolstoy (I expect lots of critques on that one!)

Spanish:  Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra 

German:  Johann Wolfgang Göthe

What are your picks?  (And, yes, if you do want to argue with my Shakespeare assertion, I'd love to hear your alternative.)

 

--Steve


 


Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers

I agree with Cervantes for Spanish.  Don Quijote is probably one of the greatest novels ever written, and he also wrote wonderful short stories and plays.  Although I would also point to my favorite soliloquy in La Vida es Sueno by Calderon de la Barca, and my favorite poets are Gustavo Adolfo Becquer and Federico Garcia Lorca.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Frequent Contributor
Bolognaking
Posts: 182
Registered: ‎08-19-2008
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers


StevePerk1 wrote:

Shakespeare was arguably the greatest writer in the English language.  (I say "arguably" only to be polite.  We all know it's not arguable...   :smileywink:)  Who would you say are the pinnacles of other languages?  Here are some of my suggestions, which, in this case, are extremely arguable!

 

French:  Victor Hugo

Russian:  Leo Tolstoy (I expect lots of critques on that one!)

Spanish:  Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra 

German:  Johann Wolfgang Göthe

What are your picks?  (And, yes, if you do want to argue with my Shakespeare assertion, I'd love to hear your alternative.)

 

--Steve


Italian: Dante Alighieri?

"We're actors - we're the opposite of people" - Tom Stoppard
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers

Watch for him in 2009 at Epics, Etc.

 


Bolognaking wrote:


Italian: Dante Alighieri?


 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Frequent Contributor
GregBauder
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎11-16-2008
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers

Steve: I'm glad you said Shakespeare is arguably the greatest writer ever. Many critics and writers have felt that Milton is the greatest. Milton had a tremendous impact on the world even though he only wrote for "the fit though few." He aided Oliver Cromwell in deposing King Charles which brought about a domino effect in Europe's disempowerment of royalty. I mentioned on a different post I wrote about a professor I had saying;" Shakespeare knew everything. Milton was the last person to know everything. Because he'd read everything." Milton influenced every noted Romantic poet and William Blake, the great visionary, believed Milton was greater than Shakespeare. Blake believed that Milton was the reincarnation of Jesus Christ, as well. Certainly, Milton was the most educated man who ever lived and he had a total photographic memory. T.S. Eliot and other critics who disagreed with Milton's spiritual beliefs said he had a tremendous poetic ability. Milton brought poetic change with his introduction of the ode, elegy ( read

Lycidas, an elegy, and you'll become a Milton fan ) and the masque, for example from other languages.

Ooops! Forgot to mention Cromwell made Milton an Ambassador of foreign tongues in his new government because it is estimated that Milton could speak and write about 15 languages. Few people

realize that Milton was not only or arguably the greatest poet but he was the best and most influential prose writer. His polemics such as the towering "Aereopagitica" allowed him to usher in 17th century ideas like free will, freedom of speech, the option of divorce, the necessity for church and government to

ALWAYS be separate, the necessity for popular culture, the corruption of clergymen, objections to hatred

and pornography. He has influenced the U.S. Constitution and Jefferson and Adams admired Milton and

turned the evil in the supreme epic"Paradise Lost" at England. In the 18th century, almost all writers and readers saw Milton's Satan as a tragic, all-too-human character. In PL we see the plot and ideas of books

such as Moby Dick and 1984, for example, where the enemy is insurmountable. Byron said PL's "Satan

led a noble revolt against political tyranny." Milton's Satan is the most complex and widely discussed character amongst critics. He fights a foe who is much stronger showing courage, and when he meets his son and daughter at the gates of hell he does not sacrifice them but bonds with them. Furthermore,

in Pandemonium ( a Milton coinage ) there are four demons who express different views on how to wage war. In heaven, Milton's God does not tolerate free thinking but is dogmatic. Remember Blake's famous

line "Milton was a true poet and of the devil's party without knowing it." Milton knew that we have conflicting feelings of good and evil and he expressed every possible idea about them WHILE referring to every literary work that went before him in many languages. PL is 12 books and Milton had to remember quotes

from everywhere and make his references. He was old and totally blind when he dictated PL to his daughter. He had no books or library to look things up! PL is so strange such as Eve emerging as a much

stronger character than Adam at the end. But, there are references Milton makes about strange beings living on other worlds or planets ( I believe there were four ). Milton had travelled to Italy before and knew Gallileo and it is intriguing to know what they talked about. PL is still being sorted out by critics and many

perceptive readers skip Milton because they think he was religious. But, Milton has had a trendous impact

on the way Westerners think and feel. His influence can't be overestimated. So, he's my choice for the

greatest writer.    -Greg             Note: Every major English speaking university offers courses only about  Milton and other courses only about Shakespeare - that speaks volumes.

Greg Bauder has a BA in English and has had five books published about schizophrenia, a disease he's had for 31 years.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers

Thanks Greg for that great assessment of Milton. I certain agree that his political achievements had great impact.  You may like to look up the discussion that some folks here had earlier this year of Paradise Lost in the Epics Book Club, ably led by our well qualified Reader-Moderator, Laurel.

 


GregBauder wrote:

Steve: I'm glad you said Shakespeare is arguably the greatest writer ever. Many critics and writers have felt that Milton is the greatest. Milton had a tremendous impact on the world even though he only wrote for "the fit though few." He aided Oliver Cromwell in deposing King Charles which brought about a domino effect in Europe's disempowerment of royalty. I mentioned on a different post I wrote about a professor I had saying;" Shakespeare knew everything. Milton was the last person to know everything. Because he'd read everything." Milton influenced every noted Romantic poet and William Blake, the great visionary, believed Milton was greater than Shakespeare. Blake believed that Milton was the reincarnation of Jesus Christ, as well. Certainly, Milton was the most educated man who ever lived and he had a total photographic memory. T.S. Eliot and other critics who disagreed with Milton's spiritual beliefs said he had a tremendous poetic ability. Milton brought poetic change with his introduction of the ode, elegy ( read

Lycidas, an elegy, and you'll become a Milton fan ) and the masque, for example from other languages.

Ooops! Forgot to mention Cromwell made Milton an Ambassador of foreign tongues in his new government because it is estimated that Milton could speak and write about 15 languages. Few people

realize that Milton was not only or arguably the greatest poet but he was the best and most influential prose writer. His polemics such as the towering "Aereopagitica" allowed him to usher in 17th century ideas like free will, freedom of speech, the option of divorce, the necessity for church and government to

ALWAYS be separate, the necessity for popular culture, the corruption of clergymen, objections to hatred

and pornography. He has influenced the U.S. Constitution and Jefferson and Adams admired Milton and

turned the evil in the supreme epic"Paradise Lost" at England. In the 18th century, almost all writers and readers saw Milton's Satan as a tragic, all-too-human character. In PL we see the plot and ideas of books

such as Moby Dick and 1984, for example, where the enemy is insurmountable. Byron said PL's "Satan

led a noble revolt against political tyranny." Milton's Satan is the most complex and widely discussed character amongst critics. He fights a foe who is much stronger showing courage, and when he meets his son and daughter at the gates of hell he does not sacrifice them but bonds with them. Furthermore,

in Pandemonium ( a Milton coinage ) there are four demons who express different views on how to wage war. In heaven, Milton's God does not tolerate free thinking but is dogmatic. Remember Blake's famous

line "Milton was a true poet and of the devil's party without knowing it." Milton knew that we have conflicting feelings of good and evil and he expressed every possible idea about them WHILE referring to every literary work that went before him in many languages. PL is 12 books and Milton had to remember quotes

from everywhere and make his references. He was old and totally blind when he dictated PL to his daughter. He had no books or library to look things up! PL is so strange such as Eve emerging as a much

stronger character than Adam at the end. But, there are references Milton makes about strange beings living on other worlds or planets ( I believe there were four ). Milton had travelled to Italy before and knew Gallileo and it is intriguing to know what they talked about. PL is still being sorted out by critics and many

perceptive readers skip Milton because they think he was religious. But, Milton has had a trendous impact

on the way Westerners think and feel. His influence can't be overestimated. So, he's my choice for the

greatest writer.    -Greg             Note: Every major English speaking university offers courses only about  Milton and other courses only about Shakespeare - that speaks volumes.


 

Frequent Contributor
GregBauder
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎11-16-2008
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers

I just tried to post on the Epic Site about Milton's Paradise Lost. I couldn't post though but some critics' comments about Book 6 in PL made me angry. He said The War In Heaven had Milton treating us like morons. I disagree vehemently and I am hoping others here might respond to what I believe. First of all, he and others said the mountains were silly and could be dodged by the angels or devils. I believe there are several reasons for the tossing of mountains. First, The Bible says if you have faith as a mustard seed you can move mountains and it also says demons believe in God and tremble at the thought. So, from a

Biblical view this makes sense. As for the dodging it is completely understandable that Milton wouldn't think of this since he was old and blind. T.S. Eliot said, astutely, that the blind Milton relied more on sound than sight in the war in Heaven. Of course there is Milton's epic comparison with The Iliad where Athena

throws a boulder at Ares and knocks him down. But, the war in Heaven also has Satan inventing gunpowder and cannons "the deep-throated engines" showing his resourcefulness. He may have gained an upper hand early against God's angels but Milton obviously knew battles can often go back and forth.

Satan puts up a heroic fight although is a little hubristic when he jests about the injured angels. As for the

temporary injuries these beings receive they are not as ridiculous as one would think: consider Star Wars

or Superman or Harry Potter where some of the characters are very seriously hurt or wounded yet bounce right back. No one says these films and books treat us like morons. So these asinine critics need to get off Milton's back and accept the fact that most critics are humbled in "the presence of a great mind",

namely Milton's. I know I've been posting a lot here but I feel very strongly about this.   -Greg

Greg Bauder has a BA in English and has had five books published about schizophrenia, a disease he's had for 31 years.
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers

Try posting there now, Greg.

 


GregBauder wrote:

I just tried to post on the Epic Site about Milton's Paradise Lost. I couldn't post though but some critics' comments about Book 6 in PL made me angry.

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers

[ Edited ]

GregBauder wrote:

 

I just tried to post on the Epic Site about Milton's Paradise Lost.


Greg--Members of the clubs don't always read posts at other clubs, so you'd be better off trying to post there again than putting your response to an Epics post over here.  Let me know if you're unsuccessful, though, and I'll see if I can move your post over there for you.  I'd move it now, but I'm not sure in which thread you'd want it to appear.

 

 

Message Edited by ConnieK on 11-19-2008 09:06 PM
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers

Also, it isn't a current discussion on the Epics site - we did it earlier in the year.  It is now archived.  I thought Greg might like to read what was posted but there will not be any feedback.  Laurel, our Reader-Moderator and a D.Litt, was particularly helpful during this discussion and her comments and research might be useful too.  Perhaps you could give Greg a link to the archived site Connie? 

 

 

 


ConnieK wrote:

 


GregBauder wrote:

 

I just tried to post on the Epic Site about Milton's Paradise Lost.


Greg--Members of the clubs don't always read posts at other clubs, so you'd be better off trying to post there again than putting your response to an Epics post over here.  Let me know if you're unsuccessful, though, and I'll see if I can move your post over there for you.  I'd move it now, but I'm not sure in which thread you'd want it to appear.

 

 

Message Edited by ConnieK on 11-19-2008 09:06 PM

 

Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: World's Greatest Writers


Choisya wrote:

Also, it isn't a current discussion on the Epics site - we did it earlier in the year.  It is now archived.  I thought Greg might like to read what was posted but there will not be any feedback.  Laurel, our Reader-Moderator and a D.Litt, was particularly helpful during this discussion and her comments and research might be useful too.  Perhaps you could give Greg a link to the archived site Connie? 

 

 

 


ConnieK wrote:

 


GregBauder wrote:

 

I just tried to post on the Epic Site about Milton's Paradise Lost.


Greg--Members of the clubs don't always read posts at other clubs, so you'd be better off trying to post there again than putting your response to an Epics post over here.  Let me know if you're unsuccessful, though, and I'll see if I can move your post over there for you.  I'd move it now, but I'm not sure in which thread you'd want it to appear.

 

 

Message Edited by ConnieK on 11-19-2008 09:06 PM

 


 

But he's responding to a post he read over there, Choisya.  Can he or you point me to the thread/post where the post he made here should go?
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Top Kudoed Authors
Users Online
Currently online: 32 members 936 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: