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cheryl_shell
Posts: 156
Registered: ‎12-08-2006
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Re: Comment on schedule for Cheryl


Everyman wrote:
There isn't a general schedule thread, and I don't like starting new threads, so I'll stick this here.

It may be premature, Cheryl, but looking ahead you might want to consider whether you really want to schedule each part of the Henry tetralogies at one full month each. We certainly need more than one month do do all three of, say, the Henry VI plays, since I expect that Choisya and I and others interested will have some vigorous discussions on the historical accuracy (or otherwise) of the plays, but to spend three months, a quarter of the year, on those three plays seems a bit extreme. So maybe you should think about scheduling, say, two months for each set of those plays?




Well, I'm not sure we'll be doing the tetralogies in order, or whether we will even do all the plays in those cycles. Since this club is just getting started, I think Barnes and Noble is seeing how things will go, not scheduling too many plays in advance.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Comment on schedule for Cheryl


cheryl_shell wrote:
Since this club is just getting started, I think Barnes and Noble is seeing how things will go, not scheduling too many plays in advance.


Gee, early on we were talking about doing all the plays, then the long poems, then the sonnets, then start on the plays all over again since people will always be coming in and going out ... I was looking forward to at least thirty years of perpetual Shakespeare discussions! [g]
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I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Comment on schedule for Cheryl

I think that B&N will now see that Shakespeare gets a good 'audience' here and will be well worth keeping on the schedule. It would be good, I think, to vary the plays twixt comedy, tragedy, history and romance, although I wonder how interested Americans other than yourself will be in the historical plays Everyman?

I also wonder whether the poems and sonnets should be included with the plays or should there be a British Poetry section rather like the one Fanuzzir seems to have established for American poetry?

Thirty years???? Are you anticipating having a computer in heaven Everyman???:smileysurprised: I believe folks who believe in The Rapture think that this will be so as they talk about their followers emailing after they go to heaven:-

http://www.raptureletters.com/

I guess our ideas of heaven will have to be updated. God may well have computers these days or even a cyber-cafe for folks like you to use.:smileyhappy:




Everyman wrote:

cheryl_shell wrote:
Since this club is just getting started, I think Barnes and Noble is seeing how things will go, not scheduling too many plays in advance.


Gee, early on we were talking about doing all the plays, then the long poems, then the sonnets, then start on the plays all over again since people will always be coming in and going out ... I was looking forward to at least thirty years of perpetual Shakespeare discussions! [g]


Frequent Contributor
stratford
Posts: 85
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Comment on schedule for Cheryl

I, for one, sincerely hope that B&N feels we are "well worth keeping on the schedule." Varying the plays is a good idea. Speaking as one American, I am interested in the history plays. I especially like Richard III, Richard II, Henry IV Part One, and Henry V, but hopefully we will have the chance to work with all of them in due time.



Choisya wrote:
I think that B&N will now see that Shakespeare gets a good 'audience' here and will be well worth keeping on the schedule. It would be good, I think, to vary the plays twixt comedy, tragedy, history and romance, although I wonder how interested Americans other than yourself will be in the historical plays Everyman?

br>



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zandyr83
Posts: 64
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions Crazy Man here

I am not sure if this was mentioned, but here goes:

After MB and Ban have spoken to the witches, MB and Ban talks with Ross and Angus. MB has an aside. Banquo, who has been talking to the latter, then turns back to Mb.
Banquo: Look how our partner's rapt.
Is this the first time we see that MB is crazy? Is he crazy? Now I am no expert on Shakespeare, but I think MB is crazy. I believe that he is "shell-shocked". He has fought all day. He has seen the death of thousands of men and has been the hand that has slain many more. At the very least, he has to be at least a little weary. The witches only mention that he was to be king. They never said anything about Mb having to kill the king. Yet, MB instantly thinks that what the witched say cannot be good or bad. What they said was true and that he feels ill at the thought of having to kill the king. I think he is on a "killing spree" mentally and this is the way he now believes he can achieve things. (I do not mean a literal killing spree!!)

Any thoughts?
Zandyr
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Questions Crazy Man here

Hi Zandy! There have been some long discussions about madness on other threads Zandyr83 In Act III This Bloody Business for instance and in The Weird Sisters.




zandyr83 wrote:
I am not sure if this was mentioned, but here goes:

After MB and Ban have spoken to the witches, MB and Ban talks with Ross and Angus. MB has an aside. Banquo, who has been talking to the latter, then turns back to Mb.
Banquo: Look how our partner's rapt.
Is this the first time we see that MB is crazy? Is he crazy? Now I am no expert on Shakespeare, but I think MB is crazy. I believe that he is "shell-shocked". He has fought all day. He has seen the death of thousands of men and has been the hand that has slain many more. At the very least, he has to be at least a little weary. The witches only mention that he was to be king. They never said anything about Mb having to kill the king. Yet, MB instantly thinks that what the witched say cannot be good or bad. What they said was true and that he feels ill at the thought of having to kill the king. I think he is on a "killing spree" mentally and this is the way he now believes he can achieve things. (I do not mean a literal killing spree!!)

Any thoughts?


Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions Crazy Man here

Was he crazy? I don't see that, personally. Even disregarding the historical Macbeth, who ruled for more than 15 years after the death of Duncan and was apparently a reasonably decent ruler, I don't see that Shakespeare suggests that he is crazy. He certainly has episodes, such as when he sees Banquo's ghost, but at other times he is perfectly sane and able to organize the defense of his castle.

S's audience probably believed in ghosts, and so would not have to created any mental explanation for his hallucinations. We today tend not to believe in ghosts, so have to find some other explanation for his seeing Banquo's ghost, and PTSD is a likely candidate.

But constant warfare had been pretty much his life, as it was the life of many in his day, and there's no evidence from S to think that he was any more affected by it than anybody else who had also been in the wars, was there?

The more interesting, to me, question is what Shakespeare wants us to think about his temporary mental state during the specific events of the murder, the hallucination about the dagger, etc., rather than general craziness. But that's just my view.


zandyr83 wrote:
I am not sure if this was mentioned, but here goes:

After MB and Ban have spoken to the witches, MB and Ban talks with Ross and Angus. MB has an aside. Banquo, who has been talking to the latter, then turns back to Mb.
Banquo: Look how our partner's rapt.
Is this the first time we see that MB is crazy? Is he crazy? Now I am no expert on Shakespeare, but I think MB is crazy. I believe that he is "shell-shocked". He has fought all day. He has seen the death of thousands of men and has been the hand that has slain many more. At the very least, he has to be at least a little weary. The witches only mention that he was to be king. They never said anything about Mb having to kill the king. Yet, MB instantly thinks that what the witched say cannot be good or bad. What they said was true and that he feels ill at the thought of having to kill the king. I think he is on a "killing spree" mentally and this is the way he now believes he can achieve things. (I do not mean a literal killing spree!!)

Any thoughts?


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I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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