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ConnieAnnKirk
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Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

Which character from Shakespeare's various plays is your favorite?

 

Mine's Hamlet, hands down.  Love the brooding, deep-thinking, conflicted types of male leads!  Ha!  :smileyvery-happy:

~ConnieAnnKirk




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Nay_the_Teacher
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

Mine is Puck from A Midsummer Nights Dream. He is so funny and mischievious. His lines are the wittiest in the whole show!
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dulcinea3
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

I'm partial to Portia.

 

(or at least I thought it would be fun to 'say' that!)

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ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?


dulcinea3 wrote:

I'm partial to Portia.

 

(or at least I thought it would be fun to 'say' that!)


 

 

 

Alliterative fun!  :smileywink:

~ConnieAnnKirk




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ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?


Nay_the_Teacher wrote:
Mine is Puck from A Midsummer Nights Dream. He is so funny and mischievious. His lines are the wittiest in the whole show!

 

 

 

Ooh, that's a good one, too!  Welcome, Nay!

~ConnieAnnKirk




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Everyman
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

King Lear.  A man who suffers deeply but exuberantly, is never less than a king even in madness, and comes before he dies to the deepest wisdom that is achievable by man.
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ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?


Everyman wrote:
King Lear.  A man who suffers deeply but exuberantly, is never less than a king even in madness, and comes before he dies to the deepest wisdom that is achievable by man.

 

 

Another good choice!  :smileywink:

~ConnieAnnKirk




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Conrad_Jalowski
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

Greetings again! My favorite Shakespearean character must be Mark Antony, as featured in the Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra. Within the phantasmagorical division of this tragedy, there is a dichotomy present: austere Rome, and sensual and voluptuous Egypt. Cleopatra VII is portayed as histrionic and Mark Antony as effeminate. Mark Antony has fallen to hubristic passions from a Roman hero to one obsequious to lascivious temptations. At first, a moral reprehension occurs as both figures are found to be heavily flawed and repulsive to the taste, yet William Shakespeare has instilled Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII  with tragic grandeur, with a hopeless love to the relentless onslaught of Rome's puissant arms. Mark Antony can be construed as multitudinous figures- an Aristotelian tragic hero, a Byronic hero or a proponent of a differentiating and more vibrant figure. Aristotelian theory consists of "hubris" as "hamartia" or the tragic flaw. Next comes "peripeteia" or a reversal of fortune, "anagnorisis" or the realization of the flaw , "catharsis" or an emotional purgation and an "epiphany" or a self-revelation. Furthermore, according to the Aristotelian Three Unities of the Unity of Time, Unity of Space and Unity of Action, Shakespeare's Antony is not one of an Aristotelian mold as the play does not take place within a twenty-four hour period, or within a twelve hour period as argued by Lodovico Castelvetro during Renaissance theory. John Dryden, Corneille, Racine, Moliere and Gotthold Ephraim Lessing all took the Aristotelian concept to heart. A byronic hero is one of magnificence of intellect and isolation filled with boundless turmoil and anguish of the mind that is self-inflicted to a contumelious and hubristic demeanour. Thus, Mark Antony though combining elements from Aristotle and Lord Byron, is a unique invention of William Shakespeare who like Joachim du Bellay, Dante and Desiderius Erasmus wrote in the vernacular and tried to illuminate the world through a whole new outlook. Overall, a character of vacillation and of contradictory values-lurking within the recesses of the human character.
"A World-Historical individual is devoted to the One Aim, regardless of all else. It is even possible that such men may treat other great, even sacred interests inconsiderately; conduct which is indeed obnoxious to moral reprehension. But so mighty a form must trample down many an innocent flower or crush to pieces many an object in its path."

From G.W.F. Hegel, Philosophy of History in Jacob Loewenberg (ed.), Hegel: Selections (New York: C. Scribner's Sons, 1929), pp. 376-80.
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EnderzLove
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

Rosalind from As You Like It is my favorite hands down. Out of all Shakespeares heroines she is the most bold and well-developed. When she meets and falls in love with Orlando she doesn't wait around crying or complaining she makes her move and gives him her necklace. You have to love that she takes things into her own hands instead of waiting around for the man like all of Shakespeares other heroines.
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ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?


EnderzLove wrote:
Rosalind from As You Like It is my favorite hands down. Out of all Shakespeares heroines she is the most bold and well-developed. When she meets and falls in love with Orlando she doesn't wait around crying or complaining she makes her move and gives him her necklace. You have to love that she takes things into her own hands instead of waiting around for the man like all of Shakespeares other heroines.

 

Welcome, EnderzLove!  Interesting choice--thanks for your perspective.  Would Kate in Taming of the Shrew be your least favorite in that case?
~ConnieAnnKirk




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Benedict1
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

My favorite, well it could be any of these:  Hamlet, Brutus, Gonzargo(Tempest), or Benedict.  What one is my favorite?  Each one has qualities that I admire; but if I had to choose... I choose... can't do it, I like the combination of qualities, none more than any other.
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Timbuktu2
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?


Everyman wrote:
King Lear.  A man who suffers deeply but exuberantly, is never less than a king even in madness, and comes before he dies to the deepest wisdom that is achievable by man.
So beautifully put Everyman.  Yes, I think no one can compare to Lear.

 

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inferno67
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

My favorite character? Hamlet, of course. Even today people can learn from the morbid Prince. No matter where it leads us, we should always question the world around us and especially our selves. Unfortunately for Denmark's favorite son, he had little time to put his now found knowledge about himself to good use. But what is most important, the answers we get or the new questions that those answers lead us to?
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ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?


inferno67 wrote:
My favorite character? Hamlet, of course. Even today people can learn from the morbid Prince. No matter where it leads us, we should always question the world around us and especially our selves. Unfortunately for Denmark's favorite son, he had little time to put his now found knowledge about himself to good use. But what is most important, the answers we get or the new questions that those answers lead us to?

 

Lovely!  Contrary to what I thought would happen in life, the older I get the more I find I have more questions than answers, but my questions are getting better. 
~ConnieAnnKirk




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Melissa_W
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

Hmmmm....I had to think about this for a while.

 

I think my favorite character would have to be Beatrice from Much Ado About Nothing; nobody ripostes like Beatrice, equalled only (occasionally) by Benedict, and she gets her man in the end (and she's not nearly so wimpy like Hero, what a baby).

 

My runners-up were King Henry V (who wouldn't go to war with him after the St. Crispin's Day speech), Mercutio (I've always been partial to the naughty boy with puns), and Viola (takes guts to pretend to be a man, wooing another woman for the man you love, and still win him over in the end).

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Laurel
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

Beatrice and Benedick are the characters who always seem to come to my mind first when I think Shakespeare, so perhaps they are my favorites. But then there are the Henrys ... and Bottom ... and that bear. Oh, I don't know!

 


pedsphleb wrote:

Hmmmm....I had to think about this for a while.

 

I think my favorite character would have to be Beatrice from Much Ado About Nothing; nobody ripostes like Beatrice, equalled only (occasionally) by Benedict, and she gets her man in the end (and she's not nearly so wimpy like Hero, what a baby).

 

My runners-up were King Henry V (who wouldn't go to war with him after the St. Crispin's Day speech), Mercutio (I've always been partial to the naughty boy with puns), and Viola (takes guts to pretend to be a man, wooing another woman for the man you love, and still win him over in the end).


 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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friery
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

For me, it's a toss-up between Richard III and Lady Macbeth.

 

Here's Richard, as he seduces the wife of the late king, over her husband's corpse.  (And guess who killed her husband?)

 

"Was ever woman in this humour woo'd?
Was ever woman in this humour won?"

King Richard III (I, ii, 227-228)

 

And dear Lady Macbeth, who shines in this exchange:

 

Lady Macbeth:
Why did you bring these daggers from the place?
They must lie there. Go carry them, and smear
The sleepy grooms with blood.

Macbeth:
I'll go no more.
I am afraid to think what I have done;
Look on't again I dare not.

Lady Macbeth:
Infirm of purpose!
Give me the daggers. The sleeping and the dead
Are but as pictures; 'tis the eye of childhood
That fears a painted devil.

Macbeth Act 2, scene 2, 45–52  

 

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EnderzLove
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

[ Edited ]

                         Welcome, EnderzLove!  Interesting choice--thanks for     

             your perspective.  Would Kate in Taming of the Shrew be your least

             favorite in that case?
 

                       ~ConnieK

 

 

No, Kate from Taming of the Shrew is not my least favorite character. She is a strong woman who finally meets her perfect match. Love will do that to you. As for all the submissive talk that is the language of the times and I believe that in order for a marriage to really work both husband and wife do have to submit to each other.

 

I think my least favorite character is Hero from Much Ado About Nothing. All these blatant lies are being told about her and she locks herself away and cries instead of defending herself.

Message Edited by EnderzLove on 12-31-2008 02:52 PM
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Marsboy
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?

I'll have to agree with Connie with Hamlet, but for different reasons. To me, Hamlet's story represents almost the ultimate true-manhood, coming-of-age story. Prince Hamlet, the boy who cannot act to kill his uncle even with promptings by ghosts,  his uncle's psychology and Cladius's actions against him, until he is validated by his father and by himself after looking at his homeland torn apart by war. Hamlet represents most people's struggle with their own insecurities and learns to feel and deal.
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Re: Who's Your Favorite Shakespearean Character?


Marsboy wrote:
I'll have to agree with Connie with Hamlet, but for different reasons. To me, Hamlet's story represents almost the ultimate true-manhood, coming-of-age story. Prince Hamlet, the boy who cannot act to kill his uncle even with promptings by ghosts,  his uncle's psychology and Cladius's actions against him, until he is validated by his father and by himself after looking at his homeland torn apart by war. Hamlet represents most people's struggle with their own insecurities and learns to feel and deal.

 

I've never really thought of Hamlet as a coming-of-age story, Marsboy, but I can see where you're coming from, and it makes sense.  I love the internal struggle of this conflicted protagonist and its external consequences.  I have lots to say on this play whenever we get to it!  :smileywink: 
~ConnieAnnKirk




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