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buddha_girl_17
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎07-09-2007
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Re: First-time Readers -- First Impressions?



ConnieK wrote:
Thanks for posting, buddha_girl_17. Do you have a page number (or chapter) for your first quote? I remember reading it, but I'd like to re-read the passage it comes

yeah, sure.

um, i'm not sure how many editions are out there, or which one you have, but in the book i have, it's on page 142, a few pages after a chapter entitled "Govinda".
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: First-time Readers -- First Impressions?

Thanks! In the B&N Classics edition, it is on page 111:

"Wisdom cannot be conveyed...One can convey knowledge but not wisdom. One can find wisdom, one can live it, one can be borne by it, one can work wonders with it, but one can neither speak it nor teach it."

~ConnieK



buddha_girl_17 wrote:


ConnieK wrote:
Thanks for posting, buddha_girl_17. Do you have a page number (or chapter) for your first quote? I remember reading it, but I'd like to re-read the passage it comes

yeah, sure.

um, i'm not sure how many editions are out there, or which one you have, but in the book i have, it's on page 142, a few pages after a chapter entitled "Govinda".



~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Reader
iciclesnot
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: First-time Readers -- First Impressions?



Sunltcloud wrote:

SAP19 wrote:
1. One of the group members thought that it was crazy.
2. One of the group members thought it was horrible, and also thought that it was fast-paced.
3. Another member thought Why am i reading this?
4. The book was boring and i really didn't see any point in reading it.



My questions to SAP19:
1. What was crazy about the book?
2. Horrible in what way?
3. Why did you read it?
4. Then what's the point in participating in this group?




Hello Suncloud! I assigned my students and class to subscribe to this as I wanted them to exprience the details they might have missed in Siddhartha. I new some did not like the book but was hoping they would get another impression of it...:smileyhappy: fingers crossed...

SAP Instructor
Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: First-time Readers -- First Impressions?

Hello Harry,
I often wonder: When is the right age for a particular book? And I haven't come up with an answer yet. It strikes when it strikes, I guess. I remember that I wasn't particularly interested when I read it the first time, probably when I was around 15. Consider the alien culture, the alien philosophical implications, oldfashioned writing, seemingly nonexistent action (by modern standards) and our changing mores and attitudes toward many happenings and emotions in this book.
It seems that the students read homosexuality into the relationship between Siddhartha and Govinda. I don't at this point. They see Siddhartha's "education" in love as a sexual relationship only. I don't. Some don't understand why Siddhartha gave up the "good life" for a life in the woods and by the river. Can you blame them?
I too tried to get them to take another look at the novel by asking them to give me a sentence they liked. Anything.
As I said before, even if they don't like the book now, some day they will remember having read it and they MIGHT come back to it. So many people have read it early in their education but don't remember much of it later on. They only remember that it was supposed to teach them something. Well, that's more than I can say about lots of books I've read in my lifetime. So, there is a chance that reading the book has accomplished its goal
Keep on trucking.
Gisela



iciclesnot wrote:


Sunltcloud wrote:

SAP19 wrote:
1. One of the group members thought that it was crazy.
2. One of the group members thought it was horrible, and also thought that it was fast-paced.
3. Another member thought Why am i reading this?
4. The book was boring and i really didn't see any point in reading it.



My questions to SAP19:
1. What was crazy about the book?
2. Horrible in what way?
3. Why did you read it?
4. Then what's the point in participating in this group?




Hello Suncloud! I assigned my students and class to subscribe to this as I wanted them to exprience the details they might have missed in Siddhartha. I new some did not like the book but was hoping they would get another impression of it...:smileyhappy: fingers crossed...

SAP Instructor

Distinguished Scribe
blkeyesuzi
Posts: 730
Registered: ‎01-26-2008
0 Kudos

Re: First-time Readers -- First Impressions?



Sunltcloud wrote:
Hello Harry,
I often wonder: When is the right age for a particular book? And I haven't come up with an answer yet. It strikes when it strikes, I guess. I remember that I wasn't particularly interested when I read it the first time, probably when I was around 15. Consider the alien culture, the alien philosophical implications, oldfashioned writing, seemingly nonexistent action (by modern standards) and our changing mores and attitudes toward many happenings and emotions in this book.
It seems that the students read homosexuality into the relationship between Siddhartha and Govinda. I don't at this point. They see Siddhartha's "education" in love as a sexual relationship only. I don't. Some don't understand why Siddhartha gave up the "good life" for a life in the woods and by the river. Can you blame them?
I too tried to get them to take another look at the novel by asking them to give me a sentence they liked. Anything.
As I said before, even if they don't like the book now, some day they will remember having read it and they MIGHT come back to it. So many people have read it early in their education but don't remember much of it later on. They only remember that it was supposed to teach them something. Well, that's more than I can say about lots of books I've read in my lifetime. So, there is a chance that reading the book has accomplished its goal
Keep on trucking.
Gisela



iciclesnot wrote:


Sunltcloud wrote:

SAP19 wrote:
1. One of the group members thought that it was crazy.
2. One of the group members thought it was horrible, and also thought that it was fast-paced.
3. Another member thought Why am i reading this?
4. The book was boring and i really didn't see any point in reading it.



My questions to SAP19:
1. What was crazy about the book?
2. Horrible in what way?
3. Why did you read it?
4. Then what's the point in participating in this group?




Hello Suncloud! I assigned my students and class to subscribe to this as I wanted them to exprience the details they might have missed in Siddhartha. I new some did not like the book but was hoping they would get another impression of it...:smileyhappy: fingers crossed...

SAP Instructor






I agree, it strikes when it strikes. For me, Siddartha struck a chord in my early twenties. I related to the search for self (still do). I'll never stop searching, I think. This little book is a giant of literature in my opinion because of its universal messages.

Many of these students will return to Siddartha as one will revisit an old friend; they'll become reacquainted and learn more with each visit. That's the beauty of good literature.

Suzi




"I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see. " --John Burroughs
Suzi

"I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see. " --John Burroughs
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