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Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Is Siddhartha arrogant? (Spoiler alert.)

I'm not quite sure how to deal with material that contains page citations. I would have put it into the chapter discussion but then I saw the question about time which also deals with later material I decided to give this its own thread.

Is Siddhartha arrogant?

On page 57 Kamaswami told Siddhartha that he had taught him everything he knew, to which Siddhartha replied: “Would you please stop trying to make fun of me with such jokes! From you I have learned the price of a basket of fish and how much interest one can demand when one lends money. This is your science. From you, dear Kamaswami, I have not learned how to think; you should rather learn that from me.”

Well, I think Siddhartha had the opportunity to learn about rice and fish and other goods. He accepted the merchant's hospitality. He stayed emotionally uninvolved with daily life. Seems to me that he could have made more of an effort to be appreciative.

Or….is it sloppy thinking on Hesse’s part? He has made Siddhartha aware of the capacity for love when it comes to the Child People. Shouldn’t he make Siddhartha dig a little deeper when it comes to the problems the average village person endures?

Can you avoid feeling the daily pains of ordinary citizens if you want to be all-knowing?
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kayaklloyd
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Is Siddhartha arrogant? (Spoiler alert.)

I think this is a great question. I think this is relative to the growth of Siddartha. As a child and a youth he sees himself as different from everyone else. Looking beyond the teacher for the absolute answer. As he transforms into the Ferryman he sees the people as a part of the unityu of the world. Quite a dramatic change from the younger dissatisfied seeker. His experience as a merchant is a failed attempt to be a part of what he sees as different form him in his youth. His most difficult struggle comes with love. Love wants to control and posess as with his son, but he realizes that he can't or at least should not posess love. Others will travel their own path, as he did.
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ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Is Siddhartha arrogant? (Spoiler alert.)

Do you think Siddhartha learns humility through his dealings with his son?

~ConnieK
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Is Siddhartha arrogant? (Spoiler alert.)


ConnieK wrote:
Do you think Siddhartha learns humility through his dealings with his son?

~ConnieK




Absolutely! Don't we all when we become parents? I remember my mother telling me, "wait until you have a child; you'll understand." I also remember looking at my daughter and thinking "wait 'til you're a mother; you'll understand."

I think it takes a certain amount of arrogance to accomplish goals in one's youth. Arrogance seems to fortify self-esteem in lieu of knowledge and thus contributes to fulfillment of performance related ambitions. As the knowledge base increases, arrogance can be fed by it, if the ego doesn't grow up. Taking on the responsibility of caring for a child seems to knock arrogance down in one big swoop. There's no faking it.

As I am getting older my relationship to control issues changes. I have friendly thoughts toward dandelions and spider webs and even smiled at my neighbor's cat when he snuck into my house and inspected the photographs on my kitchen table. I knew there had to be some kind of compensation for aging, other than cheaper movie and bus tickets.
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