Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Siddhartha and Gender

I'll start off our discussion with a few questions posed in the B&N.com classics edition.

At least one critic, Bernard Landis, has spoken of Hesse's philosophy as inclusive of masculine and feminine worlds. Which does Siddhartha belong to, or does he vacillate between the two? Is Siddhartha androgynous?
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Siddhartha and Gender


ConnieK wrote:
I'll start off our discussion with a few questions posed in the B&N.com classics edition.

At least one critic, Bernard Landis, has spoken of Hesse's philosophy as inclusive of masculine and feminine worlds. Which does Siddhartha belong to, or does he vacillate between the two? Is Siddhartha androgynous?




Hesse’s female characters in Siddhartha seem to be underdeveloped which could be a sign of the times, a sign of Hesse’s preoccupation with male characters, a sign of German culture, but Siddhartha himself combines male and female, the Jungian male and female – animus and anima – especially in his dream.

“Then he embraced Govinda, wrapped his arms around him, and while he drew him to his breast and kissed him, it ceased to be Govinda, rather it was a woman, and from the woman’s gown emerged a full breast streaming with milk, at which Siddhartha lay and drank; sweet and strong tasted the milk of this breast. It had the taste of woman and man, sun and forest, beast and blossom, of every fruit, of every desire.”

To be successful in self-discovery one has to integrate the shadow parts of the self, which means man has to accept his anima part and woman her animus part. Likewise, in Buddhist teaching, yin and yang flow into each other. I think that enlightenment is androgynous, therefore Siddhartha must be androgynous.
Contributor
Jackjoy
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Siddhartha and Gender

After reading the pp's post I have to agree with him/her. This is the first time I have read this book and a book of "fiction" so deep and intense (I love it btw). I was truly wondering what was going on in Siddartha's mind regarding gender. I was wondering until he had the dream then met the female on the street and so on. Great book!
Contributor
SAT10
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎01-09-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Siddhartha and Gender

We think Siddhartha belongs to a masculine world. He does not have many feminine characteristics. He is a very strong and determined man.
Top Kudoed Authors
User Kudos Count
1
Users Online
Currently online: 4 members 589 guests
Recent signins:
Please welcome our newest community members: