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becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Short Stories

I was thinking about the books I used to enjoy in high school and jr. high/middle school, and it occurred to me that a lot of my favorites were short stories by "adult" authors. I might not have been able to handle a full adult book in middle school, but the short stories were perfect.

I read and loved all of Ray Bradbury's short stories (two I remember especially are a mystery that I think was called "The Ravine" and a bittersweet one called "I See You Never." De Maupassant's "A Piece of String" stayed with me forever, as did O'Henry's stories (Gift of the Magi, The Last Leaf, etc.).

I also loved Agatha Christie's mystery short stories (Miss Marple was my favorite)and short story collections edited by Alfred Hitchcock and Rod Serling (The Twilight Zone).
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MattW
Posts: 211
Registered: ‎05-07-2007
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Re: Short Stories


becke_davis wrote:
I was thinking about the books I used to enjoy in high school and jr. high/middle school, and it occurred to me that a lot of my favorites were short stories by "adult" authors. I might not have been able to handle a full adult book in middle school, but the short stories were perfect.

I read and loved all of Ray Bradbury's short stories (two I remember especially are a mystery that I think was called "The Ravine" and a bittersweet one called "I See You Never." De Maupassant's "A Piece of String" stayed with me forever, as did O'Henry's stories (Gift of the Magi, The Last Leaf, etc.).

I also loved Agatha Christie's mystery short stories (Miss Marple was my favorite)and short story collections edited by Alfred Hitchcock and Rod Serling (The Twilight Zone).



Thanks for this, Becke. I read much of Ray Bradbury's work when I was younger, and I recently re-read some of them; I was stunned again about how absorbing his work is. Have anybody in this Kid Lit community read short story books they can recommend?
Matt
Teens Editor, B&N.com
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agnijay
Posts: 1,987
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Short Stories

We're doing a unit on O'Henry now, and I really like his work... the irony is fantastic. Also, I love Twain's stories. (Who doesn't?)
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platinumpink
Posts: 405
Registered: ‎12-30-2007
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Re: Short Stories

Winesburg, Ohio is a short-story collection.
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iamwhoyouthinkiam
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Registered: ‎03-20-2008
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Re: Short Stories

Ooooooh, have you read any of Neil Gaiman's short stories? He has several collections of them and I seriously carry them around with me everywhere I go. His best collection is Fragile Things. There is even a short story in there that they had him write when The Matrix came out and they posted it on the movie's official site!
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