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BN Editor
Bill_T
Posts: 366
Registered: ‎03-20-2007
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About the Book, Author, and Editor

About the Book

Book Cover Image: Title: Annotated Pride and Prejudice, Author: David M. Shapard Buy It The Annotated Pride and Prejudice
This first-ever fully annotated edition of one of the most beloved novels in the world is a sheer delight for Jane Austen fans. Here is the complete text of Pride and Prejudice with more than 2,300 annotations on facing pages, including:

Explanations of historical context
Rules of etiquette, class differences, the position of women, legal and economic realities, leisure activities, and more.

Citations from Austen's life, letters, and other writings
Parallels between the novel and Austen's experience are revealed, along with writings that illuminate her beliefs and opinions.

Definitions and clarifications
Archaic words, words still in use whose meanings have changed, and obscure passages are explained.

Literary comments and analyses
Insightful notes highlight Austen's artistry and point out the subtle ways she develops her characters and themes.

Maps and illustrations
Of places and objects mentioned in the novel.

An introduction, a bibliography, and a detailed chronology of events

Of course, one can enjoy the novel without knowing the precise definition of a gentleman, or what it signifies that a character drives a coach rather than a hack chaise, or the rules governing social interaction at a ball, but readers of The Annotated Pride and Prejudice will find that these kinds of details add immeasurably to understanding and enjoying the intricate psychological interplay of Austen's immortal characters.

About Jane Austen

Author Photo: Jane Austen Jane Austen was born in 1775 and died in 1817. The daughter of a Hampshire clergyman, she never married. On her father's retirement in 1801, the family moved to Bath for several years and then to Southampton, settling finally at Chawton Cottage, near Alton, Hampshire, which was Jane's home for the rest of her life. The novels published in Austen's lifetime were Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1816). Persuasion was issued in 1818 with Northanger Abbey. Her minor works include her juvenilia, the novella Lady Susan, and the fragments The Watsons and Sanditon.

An Autobiographical Note from David M. Shapard

Author Photo: David M. Shapard I grew up in Poughkeepsie, NY, and early on decided I wished to be a scholar, and to study history. I went to Amherst College as an undergraduate, and then to UC Berkeley to earn my doctorate in European history. My dissertation was on the 18th century French writer Denis Diderot. While in graduate school I also developed an increasing interest in literature, including Jane Austen.

Afterwards I taught history at several colleges, though without ever securing a permanent position. During this time I thought more and more about becoming a writer, especially since producing books had always been central to my wish to pursue an academic career. Eventually, with the end of one teaching job, I determined to take the plunge. I had already written one novel, but it didn't sell to a publisher and I decided that it needed further revision. Maybe I would do that or perhaps I would begin a new project. After some deliberations, the idea came to me of writing an annotated version of Pride and Prejudice. Unfortunately, I was also unable to sell it, but, knowing of the great interest in Jane Austen, I decided to publish it myself. It attained moderate success, and ultimately attracted the notice of someone at Random House, which has led to the current edition. My extensive work with Jane Austen also gave me the idea for a novel related to her, which I am currently completing.

Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: About the Book, Author, and Editor

Are you still discussing the Annotated P&P? I haven't bought the book but was looking forward to seeing the author's and folks' comments on the chapter headings given below.




Bill_T wrote:

About the Book















The Annotated Pride and Prejudice


This first-ever fully annotated edition of one of the most beloved novels in the world is a sheer delight for Jane Austen fans. Here is the complete text of Pride and Prejudice with more than 2,300 annotations on facing pages, including:

Explanations of historical context

Rules of etiquette, class differences, the position of women, legal and economic realities, leisure activities, and more.

Citations from Austen's life, letters, and other writings

Parallels between the novel and Austen's experience are revealed, along with writings that illuminate her beliefs and opinions.

Definitions and clarifications

Archaic words, words still in use whose meanings have changed, and obscure passages are explained.

Literary comments and analyses

Insightful notes highlight Austen's artistry and point out the subtle ways she develops her characters and themes.

Maps and illustrations

Of places and objects mentioned in the novel.

An introduction, a bibliography, and a detailed chronology of events

Of course, one can enjoy the novel without knowing the precise definition of a gentleman, or what it signifies that a character drives a coach rather than a hack chaise, or the rules governing social interaction at a ball, but readers of The Annotated Pride and Prejudice will find that these kinds of details add immeasurably to understanding and enjoying the intricate psychological interplay of Austen's immortal characters.






About Jane Austen











Jane Austen was born in 1775 and died in 1817. The daughter of a Hampshire clergyman, she never married. On her father's retirement in 1801, the family moved to Bath for several years and then to Southampton, settling finally at Chawton Cottage, near Alton, Hampshire, which was Jane's home for the rest of her life. The novels published in Austen's lifetime were Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1816). Persuasion was issued in 1818 with Northanger Abbey. Her minor works include her juvenilia, the novella Lady Susan, and the fragments The Watsons and Sanditon.










An Autobiographical Note from David M. Shapard











I grew up in Poughkeepsie, NY, and early on decided I wished to be a scholar, and to study history. I went to Amherst College as an undergraduate, and then to UC Berkeley to earn my doctorate in European history. My dissertation was on the 18th century French writer Denis Diderot. While in graduate school I also developed an increasing interest in literature, including Jane Austen.

Afterwards I taught history at several colleges, though without ever securing a permanent position. During this time I thought more and more about becoming a writer, especially since producing books had always been central to my wish to pursue an academic career. Eventually, with the end of one teaching job, I determined to take the plunge. I had already written one novel, but it didn't sell to a publisher and I decided that it needed further revision. Maybe I would do that or perhaps I would begin a new project. After some deliberations, the idea came to me of writing an annotated version of Pride and Prejudice. Unfortunately, I was also unable to sell it, but, knowing of the great interest in Jane Austen, I decided to publish it myself. It attained moderate success, and ultimately attracted the notice of someone at Random House, which has led to the current edition. My extensive work with Jane Austen also gave me the idea for a novel related to her, which I am currently completing.








Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: About the Book, Author, and Editor

Got my copy today.

Watch out world; I'm now armed and dangerous! :smileyhappy:
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
Redcatlady
Posts: 260
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: About the Book, Author, and Editor

In the future, will you be doing any annotated versions of Austen's other books, such as Persuasion or Mansfield Park?

Melissa/Redcatlady

Bill T. said:

Afterwards I taught history at several colleges, though without ever securing a permanent position. During this time I thought more and more about becoming a writer, especially since producing books had always been central to my wish to pursue an academic career. Eventually, with the end of one teaching job, I determined to take the plunge. I had already written one novel, but it didn't sell to a publisher and I decided that it needed further revision. Maybe I would do that or perhaps I would begin a new project. After some deliberations, the idea came to me of writing an annotated version of Pride and Prejudice. Unfortunately, I was also unable to sell it, but, knowing of the great interest in Jane Austen, I decided to publish it myself. It attained moderate success, and ultimately attracted the notice of someone at Random House, which has led to the current edition. My extensive work with Jane Austen also gave me the idea for a novel related to her, which I am currently completing.








Author
DavidShapard
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎05-24-2007
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Re: About the Book, Author, and Editor


Redcatlady wrote:
In the future, will you be doing any annotated versions of Austen's other books, such as Persuasion or Mansfield Park?

Melissa/Redcatlady







I have definitely considered doing other novels, but have not made a decision yet. Whether I do will depend on the success of this one (which will influence both me and any publishers who might be interested) and on how much other writing projects absorb my time. I certainly apprectiate your interest.
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