Reply
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Chat Room (for Off-Topic Conversation)

Here's the place to post conversation not quite relevant to our novel at hand. 
 
Thanks!
 
~ConnieK
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapters 1-9 (No Spoilers, please)

There is indeed a lot of walking in Tess, and her travels form one of the key elements of the book. Which perhaps you will select for us here for the next time a Hardy book is due for discussion? :smileyhappy:

ConnieK wrote:

An interesting observation, Everyman. Each person's walk is distinctive, but it's hard to describe in writing. I think that would make a neat dissertation to examine the motif and technique in Hardy. There's lots of walking in Tess, too, as I recall.





Everyman wrote:
The opening scene of Michael and Susan walking along the road reminds me how often Hardy's characters travel on foot. Austen's characters walk only for pleasure (with rare exceptions such as Lizzie's walk in the rain to see the ill Jane); when they travel they do so by horse or carriage. Dickens's characters are often found traveling by chaise, post, or on horseback. But in book after book, Hardy's characters walk, even on trips of relatively long distances.

Hardy was expert at describing these walking characters. The description in Chapter 1 of Henshaw walking is delightful: "His measured,
springless walk was the walk of the skilled countryman as distinct from
the desultory shamble of the general labourer; while in the turn and
plant of each foot there was, further, a dogged and cynical indifference
personal to himself..."

If I had a PhD thesis to write, I could do worse than write it on "Walking journeys in thomas Hardy."








_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Chapters 1-9 (No Spoilers, please)

If I did the selecting, that might certainly be so, Everyman!  :smileywink:  Perhaps I can pass along the suggestion to those who do make the selections for us all.
 
~ConnieK

Everyman wrote:
There is indeed a lot of walking in Tess, and her travels form one of the key elements of the book. Which perhaps you will select for us here for the next time a Hardy book is due for discussion? :smileyhappy:

ConnieK wrote:

An interesting observation, Everyman. Each person's walk is distinctive, but it's hard to describe in writing. I think that would make a neat dissertation to examine the motif and technique in Hardy. There's lots of walking in Tess, too, as I recall.





Everyman wrote:
The opening scene of Michael and Susan walking along the road reminds me how often Hardy's characters travel on foot. Austen's characters walk only for pleasure (with rare exceptions such as Lizzie's walk in the rain to see the ill Jane); when they travel they do so by horse or carriage. Dickens's characters are often found traveling by chaise, post, or on horseback. But in book after book, Hardy's characters walk, even on trips of relatively long distances.

Hardy was expert at describing these walking characters. The description in Chapter 1 of Henshaw walking is delightful: "His measured,
springless walk was the walk of the skilled countryman as distinct from
the desultory shamble of the general labourer; while in the turn and
plant of each foot there was, further, a dogged and cynical indifference
personal to himself..."

If I had a PhD thesis to write, I could do worse than write it on "Walking journeys in thomas Hardy."

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapters 1-9 (No Spoilers, please)

Who does do the selecting?

There's been a discussion over on the Community board, which you may have seen, about making the book clubs stronger. Two suggestions may be relevant here: one, that participants be invited to have some input into books they would like to read and discuss, and two, that selections be posted sooner so that people have more time to get the books and fit them into their busy lives and reading schedules. It's June 9th, for example, and there has been no posting yet about the July book club selections.

Would it be helpful, or would it be unwelcome, or a waste of effort, for people here to suggest books they would like to see selected (or be given a list of books under consideration to indicate those they would be most interested in reading and discussing)? If that would be taken amiss, there's no point in roiling waters needlessly. But if there is some consideration that readers should have input into the selections, I'm sure there are people here with ideas to offer!

This Classics areas would seem to be a good place to start, since there's no issue of seeing what new books are coming down the pike, nor is there (unfortunately!) any issue of trying to schedule in an author appearance.


ConnieK wrote:

If I did the selecting, that might certainly be so, Everyman! :smileywink: Perhaps I can pass along the suggestion to those who do make the selections for us all.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Book Club Selections

Hi, Everyman--
 
I realized I hadn't opened an Off-Topic thread, so I've moved our conversation here. 
 
I'm not aware of the discussion by readers on the Community board, but I do know that B&N.com is currently working on some changes to the clubs.  I'd suggest PMing Maria if you have concerns or suggestions as a club member.  To my knowledge, bn.com staff selects the book titles for the clubs.  Sometimes others may have input or perhaps a choice among a few suggestions, but it's their final decision, of course, since they own and operate the playground.
 
That said, I think there are some book clubs here that are set up such that the members themselves choose a book to discuss by consensus.  Literature by Women, for example, may operate this way, but don't quote me on that one!
 
Hope that helps,
 
~ConnieK
 


Everyman wrote:
Who does do the selecting?

There's been a discussion over on the Community board, which you may have seen, about making the book clubs stronger. Two suggestions may be relevant here: one, that participants be invited to have some input into books they would like to read and discuss, and two, that selections be posted sooner so that people have more time to get the books and fit them into their busy lives and reading schedules. It's June 9th, for example, and there has been no posting yet about the July book club selections.

Would it be helpful, or would it be unwelcome, or a waste of effort, for people here to suggest books they would like to see selected (or be given a list of books under consideration to indicate those they would be most interested in reading and discussing)? If that would be taken amiss, there's no point in roiling waters needlessly. But if there is some consideration that readers should have input into the selections, I'm sure there are people here with ideas to offer!

This Classics areas would seem to be a good place to start, since there's no issue of seeing what new books are coming down the pike, nor is there (unfortunately!) any issue of trying to schedule in an author appearance.


ConnieK wrote:

If I did the selecting, that might certainly be so, Everyman! :smileywink: Perhaps I can pass along the suggestion to those who do make the selections for us all.



~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

How is everyone doing?

Hi, all!
 
How is everyone doing after the first week of Mayor?  Are you still reading?  Finding it difficult to find time on these warm days?  Let me know where you are in your progress with the book!
 
~ConnieK
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: How is everyone doing?

I'm on about chapter 12, Connie, and enjoying it immensely. Actually, I'm listening to it--a reading by Pamela Garelick. She is delightful with the Dorset and Scots accents. Did you know that Thomas Hardy just had a birthday (June 2)? They're starting the celebration tomorrow in Dorchester. If he had lived, he would be 168.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: How is everyone doing?

Thanks, Laurel!  Glad to hear you're moving along, and thanks for the info. on the audio version.  It's over 90 degrees here with high humidity, and I know if others are suffering with the same conditions, it may slow down people's reading progress a bit, especially since we're not quite at the time yet for beach vacations, etc.
 
Have a great weekend!
 
~ConnieK
 


Laurel wrote:
I'm on about chapter 12, Connie, and enjoying it immensely. Actually, I'm listening to it--a reading by Pamela Garelick. She is delightful with the Dorset and Scots accents. Did you know that Thomas Hardy just had a birthday (June 2)? They're starting the celebration tomorrow in Dorchester. If he had lived, he would be 168.


~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: How is everyone doing?

Hmmm. Closer to 50 degrees here--more like Hardy Country, I suppose. This is a book to read and reread and reflect upon rather than to talk about a lot, I think, at least so far. Too bad you can't just turn on a fan, lie down, and listen.



ConnieK wrote:

Thanks, Laurel! Glad to hear you're moving along, and thanks for the info. on the audio version. It's over 90 degrees here with high humidity, and I know if others are suffering with the same conditions, it may slow down people's reading progress a bit, especially since we're not quite at the time yet for beach vacations, etc.


Have a great weekend!


~ConnieK








Laurel wrote:
I'm on about chapter 12, Connie, and enjoying it immensely. Actually, I'm listening to it--a reading by Pamela Garelick. She is delightful with the Dorset and Scots accents. Did you know that Thomas Hardy just had a birthday (June 2)? They're starting the celebration tomorrow in Dorchester. If he had lived, he would be 168.








"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: How is everyone doing?

We're having the opposite -- a cold spell. Down to 47 outside last night, and since my wife likes to sleep with the window open we had to put back on the bed the heavy blanket we took off when he temperatures were in the 70s.

ConnieK wrote:

Thanks, Laurel! Glad to hear you're moving along, and thanks for the info. on the audio version. It's over 90 degrees here with high humidity, and I know if others are suffering with the same conditions, it may slow down people's reading progress a bit, especially since we're not quite at the time yet for beach vacations, etc.


Have a great weekend!


~ConnieK








Laurel wrote:
I'm on about chapter 12, Connie, and enjoying it immensely. Actually, I'm listening to it--a reading by Pamela Garelick. She is delightful with the Dorset and Scots accents. Did you know that Thomas Hardy just had a birthday (June 2)? They're starting the celebration tomorrow in Dorchester. If he had lived, he would be 168.








_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: How is everyone doing?

[ Edited ]
Laurel's and Everyman's cold spells make me wonder what part of the country (or what country) they live in.  Much of the Eastern US is plagued with scorching heat right now.  I'm in upstate New York.  Oh, and I understand what you mean, Laurel, about reading and thinking and not yet discussing.  Happens with some books and some times.
 
~ConnieK


Message Edited by ConnieK on 06-09-2008 01:55 PM
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: How is everyone doing?

We're both in northwestern Washington State, where the climate is very much like that of England. And no, we've never met in the real world.

ConnieK wrote:

Laurel's and Everyman's cold spells make me wonder what part of the country (or what country) they live in. Much of the Eastern US is plagued with scorching heat right now. I'm in upstate New York. Oh, and I understand what you mean, Laurel, about reading and thinking and not yet discussing. Happens with some books and some times.


~ConnieK


Message Edited by ConnieK on 06-09-2008 01:55 PM


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: How is everyone doing?

Oh, that's great, Laurel; thanks.  Washington State sounds so cool and calm right about now!  One doesn't normally think of upstate New York as the tropics, but boy we can sure get some nasty summers of late.  The humidity here, especially, can wring the water out of a rock.  I retrieved my newspaper from the box in mid-afternoon today (though it is delivered in early a.m.).  It feels and even crackles like parchment! 
 
~ConnieK 

Laurel wrote:
We're both in northwestern Washington State, where the climate is very much like that of England. And no, we've never met in the real world.

ConnieK wrote:

Laurel's and Everyman's cold spells make me wonder what part of the country (or what country) they live in. Much of the Eastern US is plagued with scorching heat right now. I'm in upstate New York. Oh, and I understand what you mean, Laurel, about reading and thinking and not yet discussing. Happens with some books and some times.


~ConnieK

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: How is everyone doing?

I worked in Florida for 30 years and moved back to Washington for retirement, partly because of the weather.



ConnieK wrote:

Oh, that's great, Laurel; thanks. Washington State sounds so cool and calm right about now! One doesn't normally think of upstate New York as the tropics, but boy we can sure get some nasty summers of late. The humidity here, especially, can wring the water out of a rock. I retrieved my newspaper from the box in mid-afternoon today (though it is delivered in early a.m.). It feels and even crackles like parchment!


~ConnieK





Laurel wrote:
We're both in northwestern Washington State, where the climate is very much like that of England. And no, we've never met in the real world.




ConnieK wrote:



Laurel's and Everyman's cold spells make me wonder what part of the country (or what country) they live in. Much of the Eastern US is plagued with scorching heat right now. I'm in upstate New York. Oh, and I understand what you mean, Laurel, about reading and thinking and not yet discussing. Happens with some books and some times.




~ConnieK




"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: How is everyone doing?

I remember some mighty hot summers in Philadelphia growing up. And one particularly hot summer in NYC in the 70s when I was commuting by the Staten Island Ferry to Wall Street every day and despite the "sea breezes" dripping with sweat by the time I got to the office.

ConnieK wrote:

Oh, that's great, Laurel; thanks. Washington State sounds so cool and calm right about now! One doesn't normally think of upstate New York as the tropics, but boy we can sure get some nasty summers of late. The humidity here, especially, can wring the water out of a rock. I retrieved my newspaper from the box in mid-afternoon today (though it is delivered in early a.m.). It feels and even crackles like parchment!


~ConnieK





Laurel wrote:
We're both in northwestern Washington State, where the climate is very much like that of England. And no, we've never met in the real world.




ConnieK wrote:



Laurel's and Everyman's cold spells make me wonder what part of the country (or what country) they live in. Much of the Eastern US is plagued with scorching heat right now. I'm in upstate New York. Oh, and I understand what you mean, Laurel, about reading and thinking and not yet discussing. Happens with some books and some times.




~ConnieK




_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
ELee
Posts: 418
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Hardy to music

Since we haven't one, I'm going to treat this thread like a community room.  The question I have for readers is this:
 
If you chose to listen to music while reading TMoC (or any Hardy novel), what would you listen to?
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Hardy to music

As I began to read your note I realized that "Auld Lang Syne" was humming through my mind.

ELee wrote:
Since we haven't one, I'm going to treat this thread like a community room. The question I have for readers is this:
If you chose to listen to music while reading TMoC (or any Hardy novel), what would you listen to?



"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Hardy to music

I can't listen to music while I read. I was a semi-professional musician in my younger days, and when I listen to music, I LISTEN to music -- can't concentrate on other things, too.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Book Club Selections

I was going to post in the Announcement thread but thought my post better belonged here and I moved over your thead as well, everyman.


ConnieK wrote:
Hi, Everyman--
I realized I hadn't opened an Off-Topic thread, so I've moved our conversation here.
I'm not aware of the discussion by readers on the Community board, but I do know that B&N.com is currently working on some changes to the clubs. I'd suggest PMing Maria if you have concerns or suggestions as a club member. To my knowledge, bn.com staff selects the book titles for the clubs. Sometimes others may have input or perhaps a choice among a few suggestions, but it's their final decision, of course, since they own and operate the playground.
That said, I think there are some book clubs here that are set up such that the members themselves choose a book to discuss by consensus. Literature by Women, for example, may operate this way, but don't quote me on that one!
Hope that helps,
~ConnieK


Everyman wrote:
Who does do the selecting?

There's been a discussion over on the Community board, which you may have seen, about making the book clubs stronger. Two suggestions may be relevant here: one, that participants be invited to have some input into books they would like to read and discuss, and two, that selections be posted sooner so that people have more time to get the books and fit them into their busy lives and reading schedules. It's June 9th, for example, and there has been no posting yet about the July book club selections.

Would it be helpful, or would it be unwelcome, or a waste of effort, for people here to suggest books they would like to see selected (or be given a list of books under consideration to indicate those they would be most interested in reading and discussing)? If that would be taken amiss, there's no point in roiling waters needlessly. But if there is some consideration that readers should have input into the selections, I'm sure there are people here with ideas to offer!

This Classics areas would seem to be a good place to start, since there's no issue of seeing what new books are coming down the pike, nor is there (unfortunately!) any issue of trying to schedule in an author appearance.


ConnieK wrote:

If I did the selecting, that might certainly be so, Everyman! :smileywink: Perhaps I can pass along the suggestion to those who do make the selections for us all.







From Announcement thread:

Everyman wrote:
Thanks for posting those early!

Secret Garden is certainly a wonderful book, though it will be interesting to see how deep a discussion it will engender. But I see you do have a B&N Classics edition of it, so presumably there's at least some introductory material, and perhaps some notes, that might add substance to the story. Plus, I see that there is an Annotated Secret Garden. What on earth is there worth annotating about it?? Well, looking further, I see that there's a whole book study on TSG by Phyllis Bixler, which contends that "Its rich characterization and mythic imagery and themes have allowed it to transcend its own era; it has been described as ahead of its time for the accuracy with which it reflects our contemporary understanding of child psychology." So we'll have to see.

And I'm astonished to find that there are more than 25 separate editions of TSG offered by the BN website. Egad!

Little Women -- well, yes, I know it's a classic, and I read it when I was young, but have you actually tried reading it as an adult? It was suggested for another club a while back and I took it down to read a few pages and it was so turgid and sappy that I simply couldn't read more than a page. I know it's beloved of girls, and maybe of women, but egad, it acts on the brain like bacon on the arteries. I was interested to read this excerpt from the introduction: "After determining that her inclusion of too many controversial ideas about marriage had hurt sales of Moods, Alcott decided to make her girls' book idea-free: 'My next book shall have no ideas in it, only facts, and the people shall be as ordinary as possible.'" No ideas, eh??

And particularly if you're planning to read the whole book, part 2 as well as part 1, it's a LONG book. Do you know whether the B&N Classics edition is both parts? The website isn't clear. Part 1, at least according to the Library of America edition, has 23 chapters ending with "Aunt March settles the Question." Part 2 has 24 chapters starting with "Gossip" and ending with "Harvest Time."



Yes, early posting of upcoming books is greatly appreciated. Hope the rest of the boards do so as well.

I agree with you, everyman. I think I might pass on these. Secret Garden maybe, Little Women not. I don't object to children's books. I would could have jumped in enthusiastically for something like in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (Barnes & Noble Classics Series), which, incidentally, I have never read! But I will be back. My dance card is a bit full anyway.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Book Club Selections

Connie, you might post your summer classic selections in the Teen Reads and Family Room clubs. One of the biggest problems we encountered in our Community Room discussions on the slim discussions in the groups is that many people simply don't know these things are happening on other boards. Like quite a few people didn't know you even had a Classic Club.
Users Online
Currently online:40 members 410 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: