Last year, Marissa Meyer had a hit with her cyborg Cinderella novel, Cinder. Now shes back with book two of her Lunar Chronicles series: Scarlet. This time Meyer delves into the Little Red Riding Hood mythos, as a young girl searches for her mysteriously missing grandmother in a dangerous world.

 

Since Meyer is a fairy tale mash-up wizard, we asked her to name her Top 3 Pop Culture Mash-ups:

 

 

Here are my choices for best pop culture mash-ups:

 

 

 

 

 

1. Firefly

The Wild West meets Outer Space

 

I'm not sure if space westerns have been around long enough to constitute their own genre by now, but I still tend to think of shows like Joss Whedon’s Firefly as pop culture mash-ups combining the beloved tropes of science-fiction with the gritty storytelling and heroism of traditional westerns. From gunslinger duels to spaceship chases, train heists to advanced medical technology, jaded heroes to plenty of "thrilling heroics," this show about a spaceship crew of honorable smugglers encapsulates everything one could want from this popular mash-up.

 

 

2. Stormdancer: The Lotus War Book One by Jay Kristoff

Steampunk meets High Fantasy meets Japanese Mythology

 

Kristoff's debut novel and the first of a trilogy tells the story of Yukiko, the teenage daughter of a famed hunter who is given the impossible task of hunting down a mythical beast. Stormdancer combines three of my favorite things—complicated steampunk technology, an epic fantasy quest, and a vibrant alternate world that harks back to feudal Japan. The complex characters and lush descriptions paint such a vivid picture that I felt I was watching an anime rather than reading a book. A really good anime, like those by Hayao Miyazaki (Howl's Moving Castle, Princess Mononoke). In fact, has anyone contacted Mr. Miyazaki about film rights?

 

 

3. The Lizzie Bennet Diaries:

Pride and Prejudice meets the 21st-Century

 

Produced by vlog-superstar Hank Green, the Lizzie Bennet Diaries is a clever modern adaptation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. The majority of the story is told via video diaries on YouTube, but the producers have outdone themselves in their attempts to give the show an authentic vibe. All major characters have their own Twitter feeds or Tumblr pages, and there are even real web sites dedicated to the fictional companies discussed in the vlogs. Pemberley Digital, in particular, sounds like a lovely place to work

 


Tell Me: Whats your favorite pop culture mash-up?