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Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: movies-mythology : Freedom to choose what to write...

Yes, we may write what we choose, but we may only legitimately choose what we know, and that is shaped almost entirely by our personality, our upbringing, our talents, and our social strata. In truth, we're a lot less free than we imagine.

So very true Brendan. Do you think that writers should try to disregard all that has gone before or all that is in their 'unconscious' in the hope of coming up with something 'original' or do you think that it will come out anyway? For instance, did the creators of Superman ever acknowledge their debt to Herakles et al or did they think they had invented him out of the blue? And if you acknowledge a debt to what has gone before is this more fruitful ground for the writer than striving for 'originality'? I am thinking of the classical writers whose texts are full of allusions to other classical texts - do their works endure because they are drawing upon these rich veins? Can a book which does not draw upon them have the same enduring appeal? Or do you think, like myself, that we are always subconsciously drawing upon them, to a greater or lesser degree?




Brendan_M_Burns wrote:
crAZRick,

Point well taken. And also agreed that currently, with the exception of Daniel, all of us on this board are free to do whatsoever we choose, with the explicit understanding that no studio/director/agent is tapping their foot impatiently, waiting for our latest masterpiece.

I just don't think you're giving enough credit or recognition to the forces that affect your 'inner muse.' Like you, I would rebel at the thought of my creative writing being driven by market research, but it's actually a lot more subtle than that.

Think about your dreams at night. I don't know anyone who consciously controls their dreams. Instead, more often than not, we wake up saying "What the @#$% was that?" But nothing comes out without going in first. At least for me, every dream can ultimately be traced back to an event, image, or idea that first entered my conscious mind before being parsed into a subconscious event.

Yes, we may write what we choose, but we may only legitimately choose what we know, and that is shaped almost entirely by our personality, our upbringing, our talents, and our social strata. In truth, we're a lot less free than we imagine.


Frequent Contributor
Brendan_M_Burns
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎02-26-2007
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Re: Freedom to choose what to write...


Choisya wrote:
Do you think that writers should try to disregard all that has gone before or all that is in their 'unconscious' in the hope of coming up with something 'original' or do you think that it will come out anyway?

Choisya,

I think it is the writer's responsibility to acknowledge that which has gone before and taken root in the collective unconscious.

Everyone on this planet (at least those who are not complete narcissists or hedonists) is engaged in the same lifelong quest -- to figure out who we are, why we're here, and where we're going. These 'big questions' are the only ones that matter; everything else is just a way to bide time. This is what we ponder when we're able to steal a moment away from the frenetic whirl of daily life; the doubts and fears that we share only with our closest friends.

The writer is unique, offering personal insights for public consumption. Doing so involves the considerable risk of being mocked, mischaracterized, and misunderstood. A true writer understands this, and is therefore careful to understand and abide by the cultural framework within which he writes. At times, this requires the writer to do things that might seem odious in theory, but which are entirely practical in helping the writer convey his message. Self-censorship? You bet -- happens all the time, so that the writer won't alienate his audience. (Or are you the sort of person who believes you *must* answer honestly when your spouse asks, "Does this make me look fat?")

Being cognizant of your audience and societal norms does not restrict you as a writer. Quite the opposite -- it actually frees you to convey your message in a way that will be more effective. My college writing instructor (a successful author himself) told us we could break all the rules we wanted to, provided that we knew the rules we were breaking. I heartily concur.
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Freedom to choose what to write...

[ Edited ]
I agree with every word you have written here Brendan.:smileyhappy: (I don't have a spouse but I think my cat looks at me as if I am fat.:smileysurprised:)




Brendan_M_Burns wrote:

Choisya wrote:
Do you think that writers should try to disregard all that has gone before or all that is in their 'unconscious' in the hope of coming up with something 'original' or do you think that it will come out anyway?

Choisya,

I think it is the writer's responsibility to acknowledge that which has gone before and taken root in the collective unconscious.

Everyone on this planet (at least those who are not complete narcissists or hedonists) is engaged in the same lifelong quest -- to figure out who we are, why we're here, and where we're going. These 'big questions' are the only ones that matter; everything else is just a way to bide time. This is what we ponder when we're able to steal a moment away from the frenetic whirl of daily life; the doubts and fears that we share only with our closest friends.

The writer is unique, offering personal insights for public consumption. Doing so involves the considerable risk of being mocked, mischaracterized, and misunderstood. A true writer understands this, and is therefore careful to understand and abide by the cultural framework within which he writes. At times, this requires the writer to do things that might seem odious in theory, but which are entirely practical in helping the writer convey his message. Self-censorship? You bet -- happens all the time, so that the writer won't alienate his audience. (Or are you the sort of person who believes you *must* answer honestly when your spouse asks, "Does this make me look fat?")

Being cognizant of your audience and societal norms does not restrict you as a writer. Quite the opposite -- it actually frees you to convey your message in a way that will be more effective. My college writing instructor (a successful author himself) told us we could break all the rules we wanted to, provided that we knew the rules we were breaking. I heartily concur.

Message Edited by Choisya on 03-15-200705:30 PM

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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Re: movies-mythology : Will the next Superman have three heads?

[ Edited ]

danielnoah wrote:
I guess I missed all that when I was nine.




Meaning?

-----

I wonder if I take the Inanna myth as an example (what we have of it today is just a fragment)...what (one) film would be able to substitute for that? (That is a question, not a rhetorical question).

I am not sure one can say modern and ancient myth because myth is timeless in its essence. That is one important criteria.

Is 'One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest' a myth?

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 03-16-200703:10 PM

Frequent Contributor
crAZRick
Posts: 489
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: movies-mythology : Will the next Superman have three heads?

LOL!

:smileyvery-happy:
I no longer regret that I have no quote, quip or anecdote to share with my countrymen... how about all y'all?
Frequent Contributor
danielnoah
Posts: 141
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: movies-mythology : Will the next Superman have three heads?

Hi, Ziki. The "when I was 9" comment referred to the movie Strange Brew containing references to Hamlet.

I'm not familiar with the myth of Inanna. What is that story?

Your choice of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's nest is a curious one. I'm not sure I would call it a "myth," per se, as, for me, it lacks what I consider to be mythic elements. Perhaps more importantly - why do you ask?
Frequent Contributor
crAZRick
Posts: 489
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: movies-mythology : Will the next Superman have three heads?

uh oh :smileyhappy:
I no longer regret that I have no quote, quip or anecdote to share with my countrymen... how about all y'all?
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: movies-mythology : Is The Saint a Noble Savage?

I came across this Marxist analysis on the mythology of The Saint by a Chinese guy and thought it might interest you folks:-

http://www.mediacircus.net/saint.html
Frequent Contributor
crAZRick
Posts: 489
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: movies-mythology : Is The Saint a Noble Savage?

LOL!

:smileyvery-happy:
I no longer regret that I have no quote, quip or anecdote to share with my countrymen... how about all y'all?
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