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movies-mythology

[ Edited ]
"Movies are the contemporary mythology. They turn our past, present, and future into lore, giving us the stories to live by." (page 1)

Is this really true? I think not. If so do you have an example?

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 03-07-200706:13 PM

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crAZRick
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Re: movies-mythology



ziki wrote:
"Movies are the contemporary mythology. They turn our past, present, and future into lore, giving us the stories to live by." (page 1)

Is this really true? I think not. If so do you have an example?

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 03-07-200706:13 PM






when you think of Moses (from the Bible, if you know the stories of the Bible) what or who do you think of?



Charleton Heston, probably...

because of the movie version of the story, The Ten Commandments, not because Moses in the Bible just reads so much like like Charelton Heston.

does your Minds Eye version of Abraham Lincoln get bug-eyed and shout BE EXCELLENT TO EACH OTHER! and PARTY ON DUDE! ?? Napoleon loves ice cream and water slides?

mine does sometimes, thanks to 2 most excellent time-travelling dudes, Bill S Preston, Esq and 'Ted' Theodore Logan.


make a list of 20 Underdog Athletes or Sports Teams you can think of, who would you put on that list?

sure, a few real-life local, regional or national or international sports figures or teams, but most surely also:

Rocky Balboa
The Bad News Bears
Karate Kid, among others



do you ever dream of being a poor American stuck in Europe until you win yourself a ticket on the greatest grandest luxury liner ever to sail the seas, where you fall in love with a spoiled debutante with their own money troubles and a wealthy and jealous fiancee in tow, until the Titanic hits the iceberg, and life as you know it changes again... ??




name any 3 planets in any galaxy far far away.
Did you mention Tattooine? Coruscant? Dagobah? Alderaan?? Klingon? Vulcan? Bajor?
Sha'ka ri?

this is what I think is meant by those few lines. Because of these movies, those who have watched and wondered about things represented in the movies have another, albeit fictional, archive of 'contemporary mythology' and modern-day lore to base our dreams upon.

I'm interested to know how or why you think it False??
I no longer regret that I have no quote, quip or anecdote to share with my countrymen... how about all y'all?
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danielnoah
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Re: movies-mythology

Movies are metaphors that reflect our collective reality. Reality, in turn, is influenced by the stories those metaphors produce. I agree with crAZRick, who points out various cultural touchstones movies have provided us through the years.

Think about it. Once there was Zeus. Now there's Superman. What do they have in common? They're stories! Stories of powerful yet vulnerable people who strive and rise and fall and feel. These stories are projected onto screens for us, and we in turn project our lives onto those stories.

That's contemporary mythology.
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Re: movies-mythology



danielnoah wrote:
Movies are metaphors that reflect our collective reality. Reality, in turn, is influenced by the stories those metaphors produce. I agree with crAZRick, who points out various cultural touchstones movies have provided us through the years.

Think about it. Once there was Zeus. Now there's Superman. What do they have in common? They're stories! Stories of powerful yet vulnerable people who strive and rise and fall and feel. These stories are projected onto screens for us, and we in turn project our lives onto those stories.

That's contemporary mythology.




Myths are stories larger than life that served as a reference ground for civilizations. We lost that conections and there's a need to substitute for that. I argue that films cannot dress that wound succesfully.

That films are myths is a Hollywood myth.

ziki
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Re: movies-mythology

[ Edited ]

danielnoah wrote:Think about it. Once there was Zeus. Now there's Superman.




That would make my life into a very shallow pond. The American culture suffers from that disease.

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 03-10-200703:04 AM

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Re: movies-mythology

seems like you're swimming in the shallow end any way, ziki, contributing to another American legend: the one about folks who make lawsuits and arguments behind something completely trivial and pointless....

what is your side? I don't see your reason for arguing this point about movies making up a contemporary mythology, that becomes incorporated in the lore of people's lives.

you're not one of those folks who joins a message board expressly to spread dissent, are you ziki?

shallow pond, indeed, dude!

NO DIVING! NO LIFEGUARD ON DUTY!!

:smileyvery-happy:
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Re: movies-mythology


ziki wrote:Myths are stories larger than life that served as a reference ground for civilizations. We lost that conections and there's a need to substitute for that. I argue that films cannot dress that wound succesfully.

That films are myths is a Hollywood myth.

ziki





Ziki, I see what you're saying, but I disagree. To continue with the Superman example (which, to be fair, is really a comic book character that I'm associatiing with the movies), if you were to do a house to house survey identifying each and every family who possessed a working knowledge of the Superman story, my guess is that you'd be hard pressed to produce evidence of true ignorance of Superman totalling .00000000001%. (And that sample would consist primarily of people with severe cognitive disorders.) The evidence of Superman's cultural importance is irrefutably overwhelming.

Now, if you personally find the Superman myth to be shallow as compared to the myths of old, that's another issue entirely. I hold your opinion in the highest respect. But the fact is that the mode by which stories (myths) are passed through society has changed. Once it was verbal - people telling each other stories. Then it was print. Now, it's movies (and, to an extent, television).

So I put it back to you. Assuming that we agree civilization cannot function without myth, if you don't feel that modern myth is to be found in movies, where do you feel it's to be found?
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Re: movies-mythology

[ Edited ]
King, there's no side to a globe. I have no folks placed in categories so I might not be 'one of those'. Why can't you just settle with a knowing we might see different sides. Your view is not the only one available, it all depends on where you stand.

Dude yourself. I would appreciate if you refrain from personal attacks; it's very unappealing and it doesn't allow for a very constructive discussion.

Thanks for your POVs. Cut.

ziki in next setting

Message Edited by ziki on 03-10-200710:58 AM

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Re: movies-mythology

I asked a question of you, same as you asked a question of Daniel, dude.
No personal attack implied or intended, dude.

btw, Rick King is a character I invented, not my real name. Call me Your Highness, if you wish to worship me, but don't call me 'King' to avoid this exact confusion...

call me crAZ, call me Rick, but don't call me late for dinner!
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Re: movies-mythology

Hey, you two. Let's cool it. This is supposed to be fun. It works best when we respect each other. If you don't agree with someone, simply say so, or argue your own point of view. That way, we learn from each other. When it gets personal, it ceases to be a learning experience.

Personal attacks are not tolerated on this site. I expect that there will not be another.
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Re: movies-mythology

I'm still unaware of personal attacks being leveled, except that my usage of the term 'dude' appears to have come under fire...

Movies are the contemporary mythology. They turn our past, present, and future into lore, giving us stories to live by.


these statements are meant to be considered globally; individual mileage may vary.
In simpler terms, the depths to which an individual subscribes to or dissents against the idea that movies are the contemporary mythology takes nothing away from the concept that movies are, in fact, the contemporary mythology

here's a question:

There are no sides to a globe.



BUT... (at the same time)


Why can't you just settle with a knowing we might see different sides.


if there are no sides, how can we see different sides?
if you, as an individual disagree with and argue against a global statement, and yet at the same time, you believe there are no sides to a globe, can you not see the paradoxical hypocrisy you have jumped into?

no sides to a globe=global=universal=universal truth=a global statement is universally accepted as truth=you are arguing on the side of something to which there are not 2 sides=paradoxical hypocrisy

cut. print. that's a wrap!
end of line

ps: when I have used the word 'you' in this and any other example, I mean the global form of 'you' as in anyone and everyone who is not Me, so as to avoid any further implication that this is some how directed as a personal attack against any particular individual.
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Re: movies-mythology

[ Edited ]
Are you saying that the Superman film mythology is as strong as the mythologies about gods (like Zeus) of yesteryear? The Superman story has its roots in an historical god, that of the greek god Hercules/Heracles, son of Zeus, and to that end it is timeless but not original. The writers of books and producers of films about super-heroes are drawing upon this age-old mythology, whether they realise it or not. And it is in our own psyche, whether we realise it or not, a la Jung's Collective Unconscious.

http://ancienthistory.suite101.com/article.cfm/heracles

http://www.kheper.net/topics/Jung/collective_unconscious.html

Although it is true that a house to house survey in America would produce a very large sample of those who had knowledge of the comic-book/film Superman and would not produce the same result for Hercules (unless they had also seen the Disney film maybe, or lived in Greece), I doubt whether the same sense of awe and worship is given to a film hero as was given to the stories of the ancient Greco-Roman-Norse gods or as is given to the God/Allah/Yahweh/Jesus/Vishnu/Buddha/Mohammed pantheon today.

I see this belief and worship of some form of 'divinity' based on extraordinary events as creating myths, not films or even books, except perhaps 'sacred' books. Films are also much more transitory and the film version of Superman, for instance, is likely to be forgotten by my great-grandchildren whereas they will still know of Hercules, Vishnu, Jesus and Mohammed etc.

Additionally, myths are the product of a worldwide phenomenon and although the majority of American (and Western) children see films about Superman, this is not true of the vastly poorer parts of the world where the majority of children live. The stories of the feats of Hercules, Vishnu, Jesus and Mohammed et al 'caught on' because they were passed down to young children by word of mouth, usually before they could read. Even today young children are told traditional stories at their mothers' knees, and not the stories from films like Superman. It is these stories that pass into the 'collective unconscious' long before we attend a cinema or see a DVD. As the Jesuits are reported to say 'Give me a child for seven years....'.

So my answer to if you don't feel that modern myth is to be found in movies, where do you feel it's to be found? is that myths will still arise from word of mouth backed up by the written word because they are the more enduring. Ghandi, for instance, is already 'mythologised' in Hindu India and IMO will eventually achieve the status of a god. Nelson Mandela may do the same in Africa. Martin Luther King may eventually be canonised and will then achieve the same status to Christians. (That too is my answer to Ziki's comment that we 'have lost that connection' for making myths.) Mythological heroes have always had their stories rooted in some sort of reality, not in celluloid.



Ziki, I see what you're saying, but I disagree. To continue with the Superman example (which, to be fair, is really a comic book character that I'm associatiing with the movies), if you were to do a house to house survey identifying each and every family who possessed a working knowledge of the Superman story, my guess is that you'd be hard pressed to produce evidence of true ignorance of Superman totalling .00000000001%. (And that sample would consist primarily of people with severe cognitive disorders.) The evidence of Superman's cultural importance is irrefutably overwhelming.

Now, if you personally find the Superman myth to be shallow as compared to the myths of old, that's another issue entirely. I hold your opinion in the highest respect. But the fact is that the mode by which stories (myths) are passed through society has changed. Once it was verbal - people telling each other stories. Then it was print. Now, it's movies (and, to an extent, television).

So I put it back to you. Assuming that we agree civilization cannot function without myth, if you don't feel that modern myth is to be found in movies, where do you feel it's to be found?






danielnoah wrote:

ziki wrote:Myths are stories larger than life that served as a reference ground for civilizations. We lost that conections and there's a need to substitute for that. I argue that films cannot dress that wound succesfully.

That films are myths is a Hollywood myth.

Message Edited by Choisya on 03-11-200702:03 PM

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Re: movies-mythology

[ Edited ]
To someone from Over the Pond, this seems a peculiarly American perspective and even then I rather suspect that millions of Christians in the US don't see Moses as Charlton Heston at all but as the figure illustrated in their Bibles or in their religious mind's eye. I don't understand your reference to Napoleon but coming from a nation which fought him for 15 years, I see him as a small man in a tricorn hat with his hand in his waistcoat looking over the English Channel. Abraham Lincoln has a beard and I see the statue in front of the White House, and I forever see George Washington as chopping down a cherry tree in the story I read when I was 8 or so. (I do not recognise any of the other references except Klingon so there are no 'myths' for me there. No film will ever supplant what I was told by my mother or father, or read as a young child, long before I was taken to the cinema. That is where myths are created and passed on IMO, not at the local Multiplex.

Myths, according to the OED, 'embody popular ideas on natural or social phenonema' and are not constructed out of celluloid. We go to see a film on Moses or the Emperor Napoleon because the myths have already been passed down to us, not because Hollywood or Charlton Heston created them. Their images and many more existed long before 'celluloid' and will remain long after 'celluloid' has disintegrated, metaphorically and/or literally.






crAZRick wrote:


ziki wrote:
"Movies are the contemporary mythology. They turn our past, present, and future into lore, giving us the stories to live by." (page 1)

Is this really true? I think not. If so do you have an example?

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 03-07-200706:13 PM






when you think of Moses (from the Bible, if you know the stories of the Bible) what or who do you think of?



Charleton Heston, probably...

because of the movie version of the story, The Ten Commandments, not because Moses in the Bible just reads so much like like Charelton Heston.

does your Minds Eye version of Abraham Lincoln get bug-eyed and shout BE EXCELLENT TO EACH OTHER! and PARTY ON DUDE! ?? Napoleon loves ice cream and water slides?

mine does sometimes, thanks to 2 most excellent time-travelling dudes, Bill S Preston, Esq and 'Ted' Theodore Logan.


make a list of 20 Underdog Athletes or Sports Teams you can think of, who would you put on that list?

sure, a few real-life local, regional or national or international sports figures or teams, but most surely also:

Rocky Balboa
The Bad News Bears
Karate Kid, among others



do you ever dream of being a poor American stuck in Europe until you win yourself a ticket on the greatest grandest luxury liner ever to sail the seas, where you fall in love with a spoiled debutante with their own money troubles and a wealthy and jealous fiancee in tow, until the Titanic hits the iceberg, and life as you know it changes again... ??




name any 3 planets in any galaxy far far away.
Did you mention Tattooine? Coruscant? Dagobah? Alderaan?? Klingon? Vulcan? Bajor?
Sha'ka ri?

this is what I think is meant by those few lines. Because of these movies, those who have watched and wondered about things represented in the movies have another, albeit fictional, archive of 'contemporary mythology' and modern-day lore to base our dreams upon.

I'm interested to know how or why you think it False??

Message Edited by Choisya on 03-11-200710:56 AM

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Choisya
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Re: movies-mythology

As an Englishwoman, I am interested to know which meaning of 'dude' was intended:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dude

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dude





crAZRick wrote:
I asked a question of you, same as you asked a question of Daniel, dude.
No personal attack implied or intended, dude.
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Re: movies-mythology

[ Edited ]
Welcome to the discussion, Choisya. I'm excited by your thoughtful and informed posts! There is great wisdom in everything you've written. It's true that historically the most lasting myths are those passed down from parent to child on the knee. It is also true that the relationship one has to Superman, who is a known fiction, is very different from the relationship one has to a god. All excellent points.

I think where you and I differ on this subject is in our respective definitions of "myth." If I'm understanding you correctly, you're suggesting that the true measure of a myth's power is its shelf life, and on that score, I concede that a character from pop culture can probably never have the staying power of a deity at the center of a major religion, when looking at the way things develop over centuries.

Then again, maybe it can. Though neither of us will be around to test your hypothesis that your great grandchildren will not know Superman, I beg to differ. Superman was created in the year 1932, and never has he been more popular than he is today. (A Google search of the word "Superman" produced 32,000,000 results, while the word "Zeus" produced only 17,000,000, and "Vishnu" a mere 3,600,00.) So while I'm not going to argue that the power of a deity is threatened by the power of a comic book character ("Jesus" turns up an impressive 151,000,000 results), I am going to argue that the parameters of myth in contemporary times are widening.

Your vision of the loving and knowledgeable parent passing the stories of old to the child on the knee is timeless. However, your assertion that today it’s these stories that are fortified in children before they’re exposed to media is, sadly, not universally true. Certainly it is true in poorer cultures, as you say, and probably in more traditional Western households, as well. But here in America at least, it’s a well known fact that a majority of parents use the television as the babysitter. Kids are exposed to characters from movies and TV very early. Family-designed vehicles now come equipped with TV screens and DVD players in the back seat; driving on the freeway in LA you are bound to spot kids in minivans taking in The Matrix while en route to Grandma’s house.

And by the way, even in the poorer cultures that we agree emphasize more traditional myths, it’s well known that there is a profound hunger for “American” culture. And by that, of course, we mean Pop Culture. A young Muslim child raised by strictly religious parents in Pakistan is just as likely to clamor for a Superman doll as he is to clamor to the mosque to pray to Allah. Perhaps even more so.

Finally, this. A myth, by definition, need not evoke belief. Only the power of inspiration. Superman’s power to inspire – to reflect the human experience, to better it – is in no way limited by our knowledge that he is not real. The awe a child experiences upon seeing Clark Kent shed his everyday clothing to reveal the “superhero” that is truly inside can be just as powerful as the awe he experiences from hearing the story of Jesus’ resurrection in Church, or even the story of his great grandmother’s courage in the face of adversity as she, say, smuggled her family out of Germany during World War 2, or marched with Martin Luther King. In fact, the spectacular presentation of Superman – vivid colors, affecting music, enveloping images of flight – probably carries exponentially more power to a child than those “stories of old.”

Is it right? Is it fair? Is it healthy? That’s another discussion entirely. But it’s true. At least, as far as I can see.

Message Edited by danielnoah on 03-11-200703:05 PM

Message Edited by danielnoah on 03-11-200707:25 PM

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Re: movies-mythology

[ Edited ]
Thankyou for your kind words. However, I do not find a Google search of the internet as evidence of myth Daniel. The number of entries also reflect the preponderance of computers in the Western world. They are merely evidence of the money being spent to create the myth and I fear you are being dragged into the film-image-maker's own publicity machine:smileysurprised::- The children who are told stories by their admittedly middle-class parents will be the movers and shakers of the next generation. The Muslim child in Pakistan will clamour for a Superman doll but not get one because it is associated with magic and is 'haram' (likewise HP or Narnia books), therefore Mohammed will stay enshrined in its memory. The surprise of a child seeing Superman revealed is not 'awe' IMO and cannot supercede the personal experiences and beliefs of its family and its 'collective unconscious', which are imprinted on its psyche before and immediately following birth. (Do you really think that a Jewish child today will not be reciting 'the story of his great grandmother’s courage in the face of adversity' to its own children, in preference to Superman?)

The awe a child experiences upon seeing Clark Kent shed his everyday clothing to reveal the “superhero” that is truly is inside can be just as powerful as the awe he experiences from hearing the story of Jesus’ resurrection in Church.

I am an atheist who has never seen a Superman film so have no experience of this kind of awe and I would welcome the opinion of a committed Christian on this point. I suspect that a psychologist would say that they are entirely different experiences. Certainly one feeling seems to endure into adulthood, and the other doesn't and that must say something in itself.

If I'm understanding you correctly, you're suggesting that the true measure of a myth's power is its shelf life

Yes but not necessarily because of 'deities'. 1932 is only a smidgin of history away (I was born in 1933!) and cannot possibly compete with the 4000 year old tales from the Epic of Gilgamesh which underpin Greek, Roman and Biblical stories. Who will the next 'rave' character be and how much money will another mogul pour into it to destroy then Superman empire? The heroes of old have survived without great publicity machines or great amounts of money and IMO will continue to do so because they are imprinted on our consciousness. The very fact that Superman was created out of one of the oldest myths is proof of that.

In fact, the spectacular presentation of Superman – vivid colors, affecting music, enveloping images of flight – probably carries exponentially more power to a child than those “stories of old.” Is it right? Is it fair? Is it healthy? That’s another discussion entirely. But it’s true. At least, as far as I can see.

An opinion Daniel and no doubt one held by a lot of Americans, imbued as they are with film culture and the power of the publicity dollar, but yet to be proved 'true' over a substantial period of time. Also, at this period of our history the Western powers are in decline and the Eastern powers, viz: China and India (now referred to as Chindia!) are on the rise and it may well be their myths which our grandchildren will be adding to their lexicon, not those of America. (Incidentally, from what I see around me Batman is bigger than Superman over here, although I have no statistics.)

I think what I am saying is don't get carried away by a temporary media phenomenon and publicity engendered cult.:smileyhappy:

However, I was just passing through because I saw my pal Ziki was here. I know nothing whatsoever about screenwriting and do not want to learn how to do it, so I had better bow out again before I upset anyone.!:smileysurprised:




danielnoah wrote:
Welcome to the discussion, Choisya. I'm excited by your thoughtful and informed posts! There is great wisdom in everything you've written. It's true that historically the most lasting myths are those passed down from parent to child on the knee. It is also true that the relationship one has to Superman, who is a known fiction, is very different from the relationship one has to a god. All excellent points.

I think where you and I differ on this subject is in our respective definitions of "myth." If I'm understanding you correctly, you're suggesting that the true measure of a myth's power is its shelf life, and on that score, I concede that a character from pop culture can probably never have the staying power of a deity at the center of a major religion, when looking at the way things develop over centuries.

Then again, maybe it can. Though neither of us will be around to test your hypothesis that your great grandchildren will not know Superman, I beg to differ. Superman was created in the year 1932, and never has he been more popular than he is today. (A Google search of the word "Superman" produced 32,000,000 results, while the word "Zeus" produced only 17,000,000, and "Vishnu" a mere 3,600,00.) So while I'm not going to argue that the power of a deity is threatened by the power of a comic book character ("Jesus" turns up an impressive 151,000,000 results), I am going to argue that the parameters of myth in contemporary times are widening.

Your vision of the loving and knowledgeable parent passing the stories of old to the child on the knee is timeless. However, your assertion that today it’s these stories that are fortified in children before they’re exposed to media is, sadly, not universally true. Certainly it is true in poorer cultures, as you say, and probably in more traditional Western households, as well. But here in America at least, it’s a well known fact that a majority of parents use the television as the babysitter. Kids are exposed to characters from movies and TV very early. Family-designed vehicles now come equipped with TV screens and DVD players in the back seat; driving on the freeway in LA you are bound to spot kids in minivans taking in The Matrix while en route to Grandma’s house.

And by the way, even in the poorer cultures that we agree emphasize more traditional myths, it’s well known that there is a profound hunger for “American” culture. And by that, of course, we mean Pop Culture. A young Muslim child raised by strictly religious parents in Pakistan is just as likely to clamor for a Superman doll as he is to clamor to the mosque to pray to Allah. Perhaps even more so.

Finally, this. A myth, by definition, need not evoke belief. Only the power of inspiration. Superman’s power to inspire – to reflect the human experience, to better it – is in no way limited by our knowledge that he is not real. The awe a child experiences upon seeing Clark Kent shed his everyday clothing to reveal the “superhero” that is truly is inside can be just as powerful as the awe he experiences from hearing the story of Jesus’ resurrection in Church, or even the story of his great grandmother’s courage in the face of adversity as she, say, smuggled her family out of Germany during World War 2, or marched with Martin Luther King. In fact, the spectacular presentation of Superman – vivid colors, affecting music, enveloping images of flight – probably carries exponentially more power to a child than those “stories of old.”

Is it right? Is it fair? Is it healthy? That’s another discussion entirely. But it’s true. At least, as far as I can see.

Message Edited by Choisya on 03-11-200708:15 PM

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Re: movies-mythology

Is there anything as 'modern myth'? That would be my first question and the second one would be my suggestion to agree upon a definition of what myth is before we move on any further so that we can be sure we discuss aproximatelly the same view.

http://www.google.se/search?hl=en&defl=en&q=define:myth&sa=X&oi=glossary_definition&ct=title
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fun?



danielnoah wrote: This is supposed to be fun..




yes it is, but I am afraid it isn't.
ziki
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Re: fun?

yes it is
I no longer regret that I have no quote, quip or anecdote to share with my countrymen... how about all y'all?
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Re: movies-mythology

[ Edited ]
my personal beliefs as to the answers to ziki's questions:

#1.Yes and No and at the same time, it may not be relevent.

#2. the definition of myth:

myth= (noun) a usually legendary narrative that presents part of the beliefs of a people or explains a practice or natural phenomenon; an imaginary or unverifiable person or thing

mythology= (noun) a body of myths, especially those dealing with gods and heroes of a people

OR, in other words

mythology= a body of usually legendary narratives that present part of the beliefs of a people or explains a practice or natural phenomenon, especially those dealing with gods and heroes of a people

but we cannot leave 'contemporary' out of the equation, as that is the adjective used in the book to describe the mythology in question

contemporary=(adj) occurring or existing in the same time; marked by characteristics of the present time

so, it follows that 'movies are the contemporary mythology' is a simpler way of saying 'movies are the body of usually legendary narratives that present part of the beliefs of a people or explains a practice or natural phenomenon, especially those dealing with gods and heroes of a people that exist in and/or are marked by characteristics of the present time'

that's all it states; it doesn't say that Superman can beat up Zeus or God, or that Steven Segall and Bruce Willis could break Ghandi in two without breaking a sweat, or that America rules the rest of the world drools. It simply states that movies are the modern-day equivalent of the Storytellers of Yesteryear (whenever that may have been, however they may have shared their stories)

it doesn't say that since there are movies, humanity as a whole, can should and must stop sharing their stories verbally or in writing, passing on myths and legends as they know them the old fashioned way; it just says movies do the same thing, in these modern times, in a modern way... contemporary.. and, yes, it doesn't take Mirriam-Webster to see that a HUGE part of 'contemporary' is TEMPORARY, and all that's left after that is the 'CON'...

so, I suppose, such staunch opposition to the written-word idea that 'movies are the contemporary mythology' is all well and good, because who wants to fall for a 'con' that is only 'temporary', when instead, we can talk ourselves blue or write until our fingers fall off and hope that our words are heard or read and taken to heart, passed on for future generations, without being taken personally...

Message Edited by crAZRick on 03-11-200710:23 PM

I no longer regret that I have no quote, quip or anecdote to share with my countrymen... how about all y'all?
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