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ConnieAnnKirk
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Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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A Garden vs. "Untouched" Nature (Warning: Spoilers OK)

[ Edited ]

I haven't posted any of the B&N Classics edition discussion questions yet, so I'll start putting one up once in awhile from here on.

 

Here's our first one:

 

"A garden is not just nature untouched.  What's allowed to grow in a garden is selected and planted by humans; it is watered, weeded, and arranged by humans for human needs and tastes, and for a human aesthetic sense.  Indeed, it is hardly 'natural' at all.  How does the 'cultivated' or human or artificial or even unnatural component of a garden affect your understanding of The Secret Garden?" (p. 235).

 

What do you think?

 

~ConnieK

 

 

Message Edited by ConnieK on 07-18-2008 02:28 PM
~ConnieAnnKirk




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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
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Re: A Garden vs. "Untouched" Nature (Warning: Spoilers OK)

One thing I think is that the success of the garden was completely unrealistic.  This is fine for children reading the story, but as adults we know that a successful garden requires a lot more than weeding.  Where's the fertilizing?  Where's the pest control? 
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Choisya
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Re: A Garden vs. "Untouched" Nature (Warning: Spoilers OK)

It may be that we have fewer pests, especially large ones, in the UK but pest control isn't necessary if good hygeine is used. There are also commonly used plants, such as marigolds, geraniums and antirrhinums, which deter pests like aphids and slugs and snails.  Fertilizing is unnecessary if you make compost out of debris, leaves etc, or even if leaves are allowed to overwinter and rot on the ground, as perhaps happened in the children's garden. Wood ash from bonfires is also a fertiliser and deters slugs.  I know of many gardens here that thrive and look pretty with very little attention - it is one of the beauties of a typical English country garden such as the one described in the novel or seen here.   I have a mature English garden and do very little in it other than mow the lawn and prune, nor do I use pesticides or chemical fertilisers.

 

However, The Secret Garden is an idealisation of a garden, an Eden, so perhaps we shouldn't expect the children to deal with such prosaic matters:smileyhappy:

 

 


Everyman wrote:
One thing I think is that the success of the garden was completely unrealistic.  This is fine for children reading the story, but as adults we know that a successful garden requires a lot more than weeding.  Where's the fertilizing?  Where's the pest control? 

 

Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: A Garden vs. "Untouched" Nature (Warning: Spoilers OK)


Everyman wrote:
One thing I think is that the success of the garden was completely unrealistic.  This is fine for children reading the story, but as adults we know that a successful garden requires a lot more than weeding.  Where's the fertilizing?  Where's the pest control? 

 

Isn't there a 'magical' quality of some sort to this garden?  I'm not sure we're supposed to read it too realistically?

 

~ConnieK

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: A Garden vs. "Untouched" Nature (Warning: Spoilers OK)


ConnieK wrote:

Everyman wrote:
One thing I think is that the success of the garden was completely unrealistic.  This is fine for children reading the story, but as adults we know that a successful garden requires a lot more than weeding.  Where's the fertilizing?  Where's the pest control? 

 

Isn't there a 'magical' quality of some sort to this garden?  I'm not sure we're supposed to read it too realistically?

 

~ConnieK


 

I've started a new thread for this. 

 

~ConnieK

~ConnieAnnKirk




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