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mgirin
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Hemingway and Cuba

I am new to Hemingway but heard and seen different places where he lived. For example, I saw a cafe where Hemingway used to write his stories when he lived in/near Soho, New York City. I know one of the bloggers talks about his description of Spain, but was wondering if there are stories / novels where Hemingway descibes Cuba when he lived there. I am curios since would like to visit Cuba one day before Fidel's death to see it and compare it with what Hemingway saw (poverty, common people, etc.) Any suggestions about what stories to look for?
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fanuzzir
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Re: Hemingway and Cuba

That is a very intriguing question. I will be hunting for them.
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bob goes...



fanuzzir wrote:
That is a very intriguing question. I will be hunting for them.




What a Hemingway inspired answer!

ziki
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fanuzzir
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Re: bob goes...



ziki wrote:


fanuzzir wrote:
That is a very intriguing question. I will be hunting for them.




What a Hemingway inspired answer!

ziki


He put down his drink. It was good. He turned to the computer screen. A dull blue. Like his mood. He pecked at the keyboard, tentatively at first, and then with more force. That was good too.
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and...

[ Edited ]
LOL, you made my day, I love you for it.
I continue to paint my nails pink but I can't stop laughing so it gets a bit messy.

ziki
:-)

Message Edited by ziki on 02-13-200709:07 AM

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Re: Hemingway and Cuba

[ Edited ]
here is a link provided mostly for the pictures...i.e. the boat...wonder if EH got his idea for 'old man' on that boat... the living room we've seen from another angle...I am happy for key boards when I see his typewriter!

http://www.lostgeneration.com/article5.htm

also a boat:

http://www.pbs.org/hemingwayadventure/cuba.html

Mrs Hemingway #3 and #4 were both journalists...hmmm, how come?

Message Edited by ziki on 02-13-200707:08 AM

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Hemingway and Cuba sites

[ Edited ]
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bentley
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Re: Hemingway and Cuba



ziki wrote:
here is a link provided mostly for the pictures...i.e. the boat...wonder if EH got his idea for 'old man' on that boat... the living room we've seen from another angle...I am happy for key boards when I see his typewriter!

http://www.lostgeneration.com/article5.htm

also a boat:

http://www.pbs.org/hemingwayadventure/cuba.html

Mrs Hemingway #3 and #4 were both journalists...hmmm, how come?

Message Edited by ziki on 02-13-200707:08 AM






I thought this was interesting and was an extract from one of the essays on the Hemingway url that ziki posted (from the Michael Palin Hemingway PBS production):

"Much of Hemingway's time in Cuba was spent writing thousands of letters, for which he kept a second desk. In 1944, Martha convinced him to leave scribbling behind and join her in covering World War II in Europe. In London, he met Mary Welsh, the petite Minnesota journalist who was to become his fourth and final wife. After Hemingway's 1946 divorce from Martha, the pair returned to Cuba, exchanged vows, and shared their home with some 57 cats."

How wierd living with 57 cats but I also found out that his fourth wife was from Minnesota while the first three were born in St. Louis (so he had all American wives). Not sure how anybody can cope with 57 of anything.

I think the Michael Palin documentary on Hemingway looked like it was well done even though it is an older production. Is anyone familiar with it and is it worth getting?
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none

[ Edited ]
message moved

Message Edited by ziki on 02-15-200707:47 AM

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bentley
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The Finca Vigia (Cuban Home)

"Political Football" at Hemingway's Finca Vigía
December 17, 2006 - 5:46 by Timeless Hemingway

The deteriorating condition of Hemingway's former home in Cuba has received a lot of press attention over the past few years. In 2005, the National Trust for Historic Preservation even went as far as to label the Finca Vigía one of the eleven most endangered historic places. While both Cuban and American preservation experts are working together to reverse the effects of time on the Finca Vigía, a significant political obstacle stands in their way.

Money is desperately needed for the repair of the Finca Vigía and for Hemingway's boat, the Pilar. Due to the U.S. trade embargo against Cuba, Americans are not permitted to contribute financially to these projects. Without American financial assistance, Cuban restoration workers doubt that they can restore the house properly. Thus Hemingway's beloved Finca Vigía has become embroiled in a game of "political football," as some have called it.

Others believe that the fight to preserve the Finca Vigía has nothing to do with politics. Gladys Rodriguez, a former curator for the Finca Vigía, told NBC News recently: "Hemingway is a cultural bridge between both our people. It's not political, no I never think in that way. It's a cultural thing only." I agree that the fight to preserve the Finca Vigía has little to do with politics, but the ultimate fate of this literary treasure will likely have everything to do with politics.

To learn more about the Finca Vigía preservation efforts, visit the web site of the Hemingway Preservation Foundation.
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fanuzzir
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Re: The Finca Vigia (Cuban Home)



bentley wrote:
"Political Football" at Hemingway's Finca Vigía
December 17, 2006 - 5:46 by Timeless Hemingway

The deteriorating condition of Hemingway's former home in Cuba has received a lot of press attention over the past few years. In 2005, the National Trust for Historic Preservation even went as far as to label the Finca Vigía one of the eleven most endangered historic places. While both Cuban and American preservation experts are working together to reverse the effects of time on the Finca Vigía, a significant political obstacle stands in their way.

Money is desperately needed for the repair of the Finca Vigía and for Hemingway's boat, the Pilar. Due to the U.S. trade embargo against Cuba, Americans are not permitted to contribute financially to these projects. Without American financial assistance, Cuban restoration workers doubt that they can restore the house properly. Thus Hemingway's beloved Finca Vigía has become embroiled in a game of "political football," as some have called it.

Others believe that the fight to preserve the Finca Vigía has nothing to do with politics. Gladys Rodriguez, a former curator for the Finca Vigía, told NBC News recently: "Hemingway is a cultural bridge between both our people. It's not political, no I never think in that way. It's a cultural thing only." I agree that the fight to preserve the Finca Vigía has little to do with politics, but the ultimate fate of this literary treasure will likely have everything to do with politics.

To learn more about the Finca Vigía preservation efforts, visit the web site of the Hemingway Preservation Foundation.


I am very thankful for this reference. I had heard this controversy before and never realized we were reading the book at the center of it. It makes me think of Hemingway's sense of nationality and his love of foreign places. I wonder what he would have said about this dispute?
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bentley
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Re: The Finca Vigia (Cuban Home)


fanuzzir wrote:


bentley wrote:
"Political Football" at Hemingway's Finca Vigía
December 17, 2006 - 5:46 by Timeless Hemingway

The deteriorating condition of Hemingway's former home in Cuba has received a lot of press attention over the past few years. In 2005, the National Trust for Historic Preservation even went as far as to label the Finca Vigía one of the eleven most endangered historic places. While both Cuban and American preservation experts are working together to reverse the effects of time on the Finca Vigía, a significant political obstacle stands in their way.

Money is desperately needed for the repair of the Finca Vigía and for Hemingway's boat, the Pilar. Due to the U.S. trade embargo against Cuba, Americans are not permitted to contribute financially to these projects. Without American financial assistance, Cuban restoration workers doubt that they can restore the house properly. Thus Hemingway's beloved Finca Vigía has become embroiled in a game of "political football," as some have called it.

Others believe that the fight to preserve the Finca Vigía has nothing to do with politics. Gladys Rodriguez, a former curator for the Finca Vigía, told NBC News recently: "Hemingway is a cultural bridge between both our people. It's not political, no I never think in that way. It's a cultural thing only." I agree that the fight to preserve the Finca Vigía has little to do with politics, but the ultimate fate of this literary treasure will likely have everything to do with politics.

To learn more about the Finca Vigía preservation efforts, visit the web site of the Hemingway Preservation Foundation.


I am very thankful for this reference. I had heard this controversy before and never realized we were reading the book at the center of it. It makes me think of Hemingway's sense of nationality and his love of foreign places. I wonder what he would have said about this dispute?




It is a shame isn't it. Gregory had mentioned that they had gone back to the house (just before he died) and the contents of the house were exactly the same (nothing had changed and nothing had been removed). All of his books were exactly as they were the last time he had lived there (I guess as a child). I thought that was striking when you think that the structure of the house itself is crumbling right around all of those personal treasures and belongings of this literary icon and his family. I was trying to figure out when the embargo started with Cuba (was it during the Kennedy administration or later?) It would have been odd if it had been during the Kennedy administration because Kennedy was such a fan of Hemingway (a room dedicated to Hemingway in his library) It would have been odder for him to see the effects of this embargo on the man's house who he so much admired. He had wanted him to read at his inauguration but Hemingway had said that he was not well enough to go (yet he liked/admired Kennedy very much). I don't think Kennedy would have been happy with the outcome either and may have worked to reach some sort of accord in regards to the house specifically. Hemingway would have been very sad and might have written a political article no less.
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bentley
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Re: Hemingway and Cuba


mgirin wrote:
I am new to Hemingway but heard and seen different places where he lived. For example, I saw a cafe where Hemingway used to write his stories when he lived in/near Soho, New York City. I know one of the bloggers talks about his description of Spain, but was wondering if there are stories / novels where Hemingway descibes Cuba when he lived there. I am curios since would like to visit Cuba one day before Fidel's death to see it and compare it with what Hemingway saw (poverty, common people, etc.) Any suggestions about what stories to look for?




Mgirin,

Found two (2) stories that may discuss what you are looking for (not sure). They are set in Cuba (that is all that I know so far). Have not started them but am about to. Sometimes when a story is set somewhere it doesn't necessarily mean that Hemingway describes much of the location (but most times he does)...so I thought that I would pass this along.

The two storie are:

I Guess Everything Reminds You of Something

Great News from the Mainland
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bentley
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Re: Hemingway and Cuba

Mgrin, you can add to that list: One Trip Across (located in Part II of the Finca Vigia addition).





bentley wrote:

mgirin wrote:
I am new to Hemingway but heard and seen different places where he lived. For example, I saw a cafe where Hemingway used to write his stories when he lived in/near Soho, New York City. I know one of the bloggers talks about his description of Spain, but was wondering if there are stories / novels where Hemingway descibes Cuba when he lived there. I am curios since would like to visit Cuba one day before Fidel's death to see it and compare it with what Hemingway saw (poverty, common people, etc.) Any suggestions about what stories to look for?




Mgirin,

Found two (2) stories that may discuss what you are looking for (not sure). They are set in Cuba (that is all that I know so far). Have not started them but am about to. Sometimes when a story is set somewhere it doesn't necessarily mean that Hemingway describes much of the location (but most times he does)...so I thought that I would pass this along.

The two stories are:

I Guess Everything Reminds You of Something

Great News from the Mainland

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bentley
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A Finca Vigia Find (The Hemingway Preservation Foundation

Unlocking the Hidden Hemingway:
Discovery in Cuban Basement Offers 'Missing Piece' of Author's Life

http://www.hemingwaypreservationfoundation.org/news_7.html

This is very interesting about a secret basement at Finca Vigia (seemed to have found a gold mine of personal items, documents etc)

Pictures/photos are shown which show the condition of the structure, etc. and how assistance might be given (if interested)

Article above - worthwhile
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