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Frequent Contributor
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Questions for Bob Fanuzzi

[ Edited ]
nay, changed my mind & edited
I just read and see what happens.

Message Edited by ziki on 02-05-200706:13 AM

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Seattleslew
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Re: Questions for Bob Fanuzzi

I wonder if you could lead us slightly into the discussions of the stories. For example, unless I've been reading in thr wrong place in "Big Two-Hearted River," I find no one discussing this story as a Return-from-War story in which young Nick is francitcally trying to hold himself together and not lose his mind because he was so damaged by the war. Thus the need to find the river and the great, though understated, relief in find that "The river was there." All the bombed-out-like descriptions are not Michigan but the battlefields of Italy. And the rigorous detailing of fly fioshing -- readers must not leave the story until they know the why of such passages, else they haven't actually done the job of reading.

I think iot would be advantageous for you to suggestion some pathways or else provide some questions to help lead readers not familiar with Hemingway and close reading techniques in actually "getting" the stories.
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fanuzzir
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Re: Questions for Bob Fanuzzi

Thank you for your suggestions. I am just getting to this board and into the stories myself. There are about 12 short stories listed, however, and I might not be able to get to the story you are reading as soon as you would like. The "book club" format encourages readers to fish around for ideas with other readers, so please don't feel that you are missing the "correct" interpretation.
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fanuzzir
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Re: Questions for Bob Fanuzzi

PLease see my discussion of these stories in the "Big Two hearted River thread. The bombed out landscape is in fact Michigan, though metaphorically and psychologically it may well be the Italy that Nick Adams has recently left.
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bentley
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Re: Questions for Bob Fanuzzi

Bob,

Once you have read the twelve stories or so that are mentioned..and you read another..should one just open up a thread for it to begin discussion or just wait for you to do that.

Just asking because I am new to this format.
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fanuzzir
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Re: Questions for Bob Fanuzzi

By all means. Please take the initiative and let us discover either a new story or pose a theme, like Hemingway's women, that might give us some opportunity for general thoughts and commentary.
Thanks for your contribution already.
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bentley
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Re: Questions for Bob Fanuzzi

Bob,

Another question for you (not to trouble you but curious)..how long do we have to read the Finca Vigia edition (in terms of the BN board).

I hope it is not a month because it is already February 20th...is it longer than the end of February (I hope).

Thanks..I may have missed the answer to this question somewhere.
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fanuzzir
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Hemingway forever?



bentley wrote:
Bob,

Another question for you (not to trouble you but curious)..how long do we have to read the Finca Vigia edition (in terms of the BN board).

I hope it is not a month because it is already February 20th...is it longer than the end of February (I hope).

Thanks..I may have missed the answer to this question somewhere.


Bentley, generally the discussions for a month, but you will see that there are still boards for Mobdy Dick active. By March we will be reading Huck Finn and I will be staging another organized discussion, but if there is still a coalition of the willing out there who would continue the Hemingway discussion, then by all means.
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bentley
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Re: Hemingway forever?



fanuzzir wrote:


bentley wrote:
Bob,

Another question for you (not to trouble you but curious)..how long do we have to read the Finca Vigia edition (in terms of the BN board).

I hope it is not a month because it is already February 20th...is it longer than the end of February (I hope).

Thanks..I may have missed the answer to this question somewhere.


Bentley, generally the discussions for a month, but you will see that there are still boards for Mobdy Dick active. By March we will be reading Huck Finn and I will be staging another organized discussion, but if there is still a coalition of the willing out there who would continue the Hemingway discussion, then by all means.




No not forever..but a few more weeks might do..and an organized discussion would be terrific for Huck Finn..I haven't read Huck Finn for over a decade anyways...but I am certainly in the coalition of the willing to finish the Finca Vigia (like to finish what I start) and have never gotten through the short stories before (I have sort of thrown the gauntlet down to get the darn thing done). I will keep going on it anyways..can't speak for anyone else. I think that Mark Twain in general is an easier read than Hemingway so a month is more than enough time for Huck Finn.

Thanks for your response and that makes me feel that I have more time. I might just also try to get moving on Huck Finn.

Take care..
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fanuzzir
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Re: Hemingway forever?

Why don't you or anyone else give me some recommendations on stories we should read from this collecton so that I can plan for our last weeks on the Finca Vigia?
Thanks,
Bob
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bentley
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Re: Hemingway forever?

[ Edited ]
It might be easier to talk first about the ones we have discussed or are on the table now:

We have done a pretty good job on the following:

The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber
The Snows of Kilimanjaro
Up in Michigan
The End of Something
The Three Day Blow
Big Two Hearted River (Part I and Part II)
Hills Like White Elephants
The Killers
A Clean Well Lighted Place
A Train Trip (some)
The Porter (not a lot yet
Landscape with Figures

Just started:
I Guess Everything Reminds You of Something
Great News from the Mainland
The Strange Country

I have posted comments on but there has not been a lot of discussion yet on:

Cat in the Rain
The Porter (not a lot yet)
Black Ass at the Cross Roads

Others have posted comments but there has not been a lot of discussion on:

The Undefeated
Fifty Grand (only one zman post)

I was going to move on to the Part II stories and from Part One possibly do A Canary for One and Fathers and Sons (recommendations of Patrick Hemingway)

There is a fair amount that has not been covered but I really think given another 3 - 6 weeks we could get it done or at least set the groundwork for everything to at least be introduced and then folks can read them or not (depending on their inclinations but at least the stories were introduced).

It looks like there are 69 stories and we have covered only about 21 of those. That leaves 48 to cover or about two thirds to cover. We covered about a third in three weeks.

Frankly, I do not consider it unreasonable to get 10 stories (about 100 pages) a week introduced. People can jump in when they are ready. That really is only 14 to 15 pages a day.

I think what is happening is that the core group of people have spread themselves across a number of boards and are reading multiple books (you may in fact be faced with a lot of that yourself). I think that is impossible with folks working full time and with other personal commitments. It makes it tough.

But introducing all of the stories and setting the platform for the discussion of all of these stories..it is setting the stage for the reading to continue and be completed. Then folks can still pace themselves and finish when they finish (whenever that happens to be)

I looked at Huck Finn for example and that is only a 292 page book (the Finca Vigia) is more than twice that with 69 different stories and an abundance of plots and themes.

Hope the above helps..not sure if it does..but it gives you a baseline in terms of where we are now.

Message Edited by bentley on 02-21-200710:13 PM

Message Edited by bentley on 02-21-200710:16 PM

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