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bentley
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The Part II Stories (Finca Vigia)

Part II of the Finca Vigia edition focuses on short stories published in books or magazines subsequent to "The First Forty-nine".

They include:

One Trip Across
The Tradesman Return
The Denunciation
The Butterfly and the Tank
Night Before Battle
Under the Ridge
Nobody Ever Dies
The Good Lion
The Faithful Bull
Get a Seeing-Eye Dog
A Man of the World
Summer People
The Last Good Country
An African Story

Please feel free to start a discussion on any of the above stories when you have had an opportunity to read them. I have not had a chance to begin this group as yet but will be reading them next. If some of the stories belong to other categories like Hemingway and War we can always move the discussion. This thread just gives a vessel to hold discussions for this grouping as a start.

None of the above stories have been discussed to date in the Hemingway forum.
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bentley
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Re: The Part II Stories (One Trip Across)

Please do not read any further if you have not read this story, I would not want to spoil it for you.

One Trip Across:

“One Trip Across” was one of two contributions to Cosmopolitan in the mid-1930’s. This “complete short novel” was lightly revised and became the first part of Hemingway’s novel, To Have and Have Not (1937).

The opening line evokes a visual in your mind and in the Virtual Gourmet (url included for those especially interested in EH and food and drink) there was no doubt that it resonated with them too.

"Who ever visits a place solely because Noel Coward, Orson Welles, Pablo Neruda or even Scott Fitzgerald stayed or ate there? Far beyond those authors' and others' ability to make a place memorable, Hemingway's greatest strength was his gift for enticing people to follow in his footsteps, to savor what he saw, ate and drank, and to feel what he felt, so that after visiting those places you could read again the opening line of his story "One Trip Across"--"You know how it is there early in the morning in Havana with the bums still asleep against the walls of the buildings; before the ice wagons come by with ice for the bars?"--and you can nod and say to yourself, yes, that's the way it is, that's the way Hemingway promised it would be."

http://pages.prodigy.net/johnmariani/040628/
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bentley
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Re: The Part II Stories (The Tradesman Returns)

[ Edited ]
Please do not read any further if you have not read these first two stories in Part II. Would not want to spoil it for you.

These two stories (including the one previously discussed) became part of the novel To Have and To Have Not. The characterizations and names of the characters were very confusing in "The Tradesman Returns". Possibly someone else can sort that out on the forum. I personally have never read the novel To Have and To Have Not nor have I seen the movie.

The plot of that novel (what the old movie review stated):

"Harry Morgan and his alcoholic sidekick, Eddie, are based on the island of Martinique and crew a boat available for hire. However, since the second world war is happening around them business is not what it could be and after a customer who owes them a large sum fails to pay they are forced against their better judgement to violate their preferred neutrality and to take a job for the resistance transporting a fugitive on the run from the Nazis to Martinique. Through all this runs the stormy relationship between Morgan and Marie "Slim" Browning, a resistance sympathizer and the sassy singer in the club where Morgan spends most of his days". - Movie Review

In "One Trip Across"..smuggling is definately going on (the human kind and you meet Mr. Sing) and in this second story the captain is trying to get Wesley back for treatment because he has been shot (another kind of smuggling - bootlegging - running liquor from Cuba) There are no female characters in either one of the stories and I do not see any mention of Martinique. Eddie is in the first story and they (Harry and crew) are owed money from a customer which forces them into their predicament to begin with.

But I can't say that I thought that these fugitives were on the run from the Nazis to Martinique in One Trip Across (like the review for To Have and To Have Not says). But again the details are confusing and Hemingway makes the reader fill in major blanks. Maybe someone else can help out here.

Morgan appears to be in this story as well. Captain Willie Adams definately cuts Harry and Wesley some slack..saving them from losing the boat, the load of liquor and going to jail in "The Tradesman Returns".

Harry ends the story by saying, "He always felt this way coming home at the end of the trip. I hope they can fix that arm. I got a lot of use for that arm."

Message Edited by bentley on 02-23-200702:49 PM

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Re: The Part II Stories (The Denunciation)

This is a war story so the discussion will be moved for this Part II story to the Hemingway and War thread.
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bentley
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Re: The Part II Stories (The Denunciation) and The Butterfly and the Tank

Both should be discussed on the Hemingway and War thread. Moving the discussion for both of these to that thread.
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bentley
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Re: The Part II Stories (Get A Seeing-Eyed Dog)

This story was reviewed and commented upon in the Hemingway and Women thread.
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Re: The Part II Stories (A Man of the World)

For those who have not read the above story, please read no further.

I am reading this story next because it appears to be a sequel to "Get A Seeing-Eyed Dog"

Here you have Blindy going to his favorite bars and he obviously smells because there are numerous lines devoted to this sense.

"On this night it was really cold outside and he came in with icicles on his mustache and small pus icicles out of both eyes and he didn't look really very good. Even his smell froze but that wasn't for very long and he started to put out almost as soon as the door was shut. It was always hard for me to look at him but I was looking at him carefully because I knew he always rode and I didn't see how he could be frozen so bad." (I think EH is referring to how Blindy is frozen also in time and encased in still talking about the past and the fight which cost him a lot in life never mind his opponent)

This next line is telling about silence and people leaving because in this case they could not stand the smell.

"finally the fellow quit playing and came over to the bar. Blindy had run him out but he had no way of noticing it because the other fellow didn't say anything"

"But at the bar it was pleasant and the place had been nice until Blindy had come in. Now everybody was figuring they might as well go next door to The Index or else cut out and go home."

Then the story of the "fight" emerges and how Blindy (formerly Blacky) lost his eyesight. A fight between him and Willie Sawyer (the person who put him out of the car earlier in the evening because he smelled). Because of the damage that Blindy inflicted on Willie..he actually would like to see that. Blindy said, "You know that's one of the reasons that I'd like to see sometimes. I'd like to get a good look at him."

Then comes the reason for the title of the story: "You know that Willie Sawyer he'll never be a man of the world." (as if Blindy was - the fight ruining two (2) lives)

Blindy ends the story very sadly (I think for both of them): "That Willis Sawyer. Probably alone home by himself. That Willie Sawyer he don't know how to have any fun at all." Again nobody is having fun imagining this scene especially the reader..but see it you did and even sense the smell (seeing things a lot clearer than Blindy). EH really had a way of creating the sensory intensity in his stories and you looked and did not like what you saw but he told you anyways.
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Re: The Part II Stories (Summer People)

I will be rereading this story next (have read it twice already and I see different things each time in the story). I will post whatever comments that I have on this thread.

Note: If you are worried about spoiling the story for yourself, please do not read anything further.

This is a Nick Adams story but I will leave this discussion here for now since there have been no Nick Adams stories discussed (in the Nick Adams thread).

Since this is an Adams story from the Part II stories, I will leave the discussion within the framework of the Part II stories (to save space and to leave as many together as possible in this thread).

For the women characterizations abundant in this story, I will move those and/or cite those only in the Hemingway and Women thread. I will repost this with my interpretation later as I have time.

This is an interesting read. In this story, Nick wants to be a fish!
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Re: The Part II Stories (Summer People)

Finished this story and the others today. Would recommend it since it has some attitudes of marriage and how you handle a friend's loyalty to be odd (but seemed to be vintage EH).

Nick definately liked to swim off the radar screen.
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bentley
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Re: The Part II Stories (Summer People)

This might be helpful in determining the locations of some of the stories here in Part II or in the rest of the anthology. Hope it helps, it helped me.


http://www.northquest.com/hemingway/hemsites.html
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