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bentley
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The Rest of the Forty-Nine

Since we seem to be getting down to the wire, I thought that I would open a thread to be a vessel for any discussions on the following stories (the ones of the original 49 that we did not get to as yet). They include the following remaining stories:


The Capital of the World
Old Man at the Bridge
On the Quai at Smyrna
Indian Camp
The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife
The Battler
A Very Short Story
Soldier's Home
The Revolutionist
Mr. and Mrs. Elliot
Out of Season
Cross-Country Snow
My Old Man
In Another Country
Che Ti Dice La Patria
A Simple Enquiry
Ten Indians
A Canary for One
An Alpine Idyll
A Pursuit Race
Today is Friday
Banal Story
Now I Lay Me
After the Storm
The Light of the World
God Rest You Merry Gentlemen
A Way You'll Never Be
The Mother of a Queen
One Reader Writes
Homage to Switzerland
A Day's Wait
A Natural History of the Dead
Wine of Wyoming
The Gambler, the Nun, and the Radio
Fathers and Sons

There are quite a few stories that we haven't even touched upon anywhere. Please feel free to begin discussion of "any" of these stories and in any order. If any of the stories reflect themes elsewhere discussion can always be moved to that appropriate thread. There is a fair amount that has never been completed.

Also it is not necessary to stay within this framework. Just thought that I would identify which stories have still not been discussed "anywhere" with less than a week to go. This might "bubble" these titles to the top so that they are on folks' radar screen. Please jump in anywhere and with any story.

Thanks.
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bentley
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine (The Capital of the World)

If you have not read this story, please do not read any further because I do not want to spoil it for you.


Basic Plot:

"The Capital of the World," is a story in which two young cafe waiters tie knives to a chair to simulate a bull, until one of them is fatally gored.

Here is a url which discusses Hemingway in Pamplona and his views on bullfighting.

http://www.literarytraveler.com/literary_articles/hemingway_pamplona_spain.aspx

Short Abstract/Quote:

"In his bullfighting memoir, A Dangerous Summer, Hemingway remarks, Pamplona is no place to bring your wife." His reasons are the best description of those seven days.

The odds are all in favor of her getting ill, hurt or wounded or at least jostled and wine squirted all over her, or of losing her; maybe all three. It's a man's fiesta and women at it make trouble, never intentionally of course, but they nearly always make or have trouble. I wrote a book on this once. Of course if she can talk Spanish so she knows she is being joked with and not insulted, if she can drink wine all day and all night and dance with any group of strangers who invite her, if she does not mind things being spilled on her, if she adores continual noise and music and loves fireworks, especially those that fall close to her or burn her clothes, if she thinks it is sound and logical to see how close you can come to being killed by bulls for fun and for free, if she doesn't catch cold when she is rained on and appreciates dust, likes disorder and irregular meals and never needs to sleep and still keeps clean and neat without running water; then bring her. You'll probably lose her to a better man than you."

The Story Itself:

The boy Paco dies full of illusions. "He had not had time in his life to lose any of them, nor even, at the end, to complete an act of contrition. And then what is most unbelievable in the midst of this tragic story, Hemingway tells another joke just like he started the story. "He had not even had time to be disappointed in the Garbo picture which disappointed all Madrid for a week."

I was upset with the cavalier approach of this story and the young unnecesary death which took place...but more so with Hemingway's joke at the end which disrupted the tone of the story for me and seemed empty and callous. Possibly this was done to change the mood for the reader but all it did was annoy me.

Has anyone read the story and if so what were their feelings about it?
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bentley
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine (Old Man at the Bridge)

Please do not read any further if you have not read this short story (Old Man at the Bridge). I do not want to spoil it for you if you have not read it.


The Old Man at the Bridge was written in Barcelona. (This is a very short story - only two pages long - not hard to get through)

The story is about an old man who has left his village because of artillery fire. He has walked about 7 miles and cannot go on. He is about to die but is not concerned about himself. He cares solely for the only friends he has ever had (his animals). The irony is that the animals have a much better chance of surviving than the old man does.

The story ends sadly: "There was nothing to do about him. It was Easter Sunday and the Fascists were advancing toward the Ebro. It was a gray overcast day with a low ceiling so their planes were not up. That and the fact that cats know how to look after themselves was all the good luck that old man would ever have."

A helpful url: http://www.lostgeneration.com/hemfaq.htm#bridge
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bentley
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine (On the Quai at Smyrna)

Please do not read any further if you have not read this story, I do not want to ruin it for you. Tough subjects.

On the Quai at Smyrna:

This is another piece called flash fiction. (It is less than two pages long - easy reading though a very tough group of subject(s))

The story starts out with a very eerie beginning: "The strange thing was, he said, how they screamed every night at midnight. I do not know why they screamed at that time. We were in the harbor and they were all on the pier and at midnight they started screaming." Those who were screaming are never named.

The story gets even more gruesome: "The worst, he said, were the women with dead babies. You couldn't get the women to give up their babies. They'd have babies dead for six days. Wouldn't give them up. Nothing you could do about it. Had to take them away finally."

Just when you thought that you had as much gruesomeness as you could handle: EH states that the "Greeks were nice chaps too. When they evacuated they had all their baggage animals they couldn't take off with them so they just broke their forelegs and dumped them into the shallow water. All those mules with their forelegs broken pushed over into the shallow water. It was all a pleasant business. My word yes a most pleasant business."

The story deals with the horrors of war. The narrator recalls for the reader a naval officer’s response to the death involved. The worst aspect of the scene is the women with dead babies.

Death is the primary image and feature of the war, something the soldiers must deal with as if it were a chore. The naval officer describes cleaning up dead bodies as if they were trash.

At the end animals are cruelly killed as part of the evacuation. Death invades all aspects of war, and it foreshadows the death, suffering, and loss which is inevitable. EH seems to be also discussing the processes of social conflict and the overwhelming despair of the human beings trying to live through it (those who made it).
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bentley
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine

I have a proposal. To help everyone, maybe each one of us can sign up to review and post a full discussion of let's say three of the remaining short stories that have not been touched yet in the forum. I have done three here in this forum already and have read the next five. I would also be interested in doing A Canary for One which I am reading now. That leaves an abundant list. How about everyone signing up for three or four of their choices so that we can initiate discussions on these asap. Just post which ones you are commiting to do and then do them and post your write up. If everybody who had participated would do that we could get through all of these and have loads of discussion. Just an idea. Then you would lead the discussion for your selected stories.

These are the ones that I am commiting to do right away.

Indian Camp
The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife
The Battler
A Very Short Story
Soldier's Home
A Canary for One


This is the remaining list.

The Capital of the World - done (Bentley)
Old Man at the Bridge - done (Bentley)
On the Quai at Smyrna - done (Bentley)
Indian Camp in progress - (Bentley)
The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife - in progress (Bentley)
The Battler - in progress Bentley
A Very Short Story - in progress (Bentley)
Soldier's Home - in progress (Bentley)
The Revolutionist
Mr. and Mrs. Elliot
Out of Season
Cross-Country Snow
My Old Man
In Another Country
Che Ti Dice La Patria
A Simple Enquiry
Ten Indians
A Canary for One
An Alpine Idyll
A Pursuit Race
Today is Friday
Banal Story
Now I Lay Me
After the Storm
The Light of the World
God Rest You Merry Gentlemen
A Way You'll Never Be
The Mother of a Queen
One Reader Writes
Homage to Switzerland
A Day's Wait
A Natural History of the Dead
Wine of Wyoming
The Gambler, the Nun, and the Radio
Fathers and Sons

And if you would like to do any of the others that I signed up for - feel free to let me know and I will switch.

Thought it might be a good way to get the stories initiated and start a lot of discussion on them.

Only an idea.
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bentley
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine

[ Edited ]

bentley wrote:
I have a proposal. To help everyone, maybe each one of us can sign up to review and post a full discussion of let's say three of the remaining short stories that have not been touched yet in the forum. I have done three here in this forum already and have read the next five. I would also be interested in doing A Canary for One which I am reading now. That leaves an abundant list. How about everyone signing up for three or four of their choices so that we can initiate discussions on these asap. Just post which ones you are commiting to do and then do them and post your write up. If everybody who had participated would do that we could get through all of these and have loads of discussion. Just an idea. Then you would lead the discussion for your selected stories.

These are the ones that I am commiting to do right away.

Indian Camp
The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife
The Battler
A Very Short Story
Soldier's Home
A Canary for One


This is the remaining list.

The Capital of the World - done (Bentley)
Old Man at the Bridge - done (Bentley)
On the Quai at Smyrna - done (Bentley)
Indian Camp in progress - (Bentley)
The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife - in progress (Bentley)
The Battler - in progress Bentley
A Very Short Story - in progress (Bentley)
Soldier's Home - in progress (Bentley)
The Revolutionist
Mr. and Mrs. Elliot
Out of Season
Cross-Country Snow
My Old Man
In Another Country
Che Ti Dice La Patria
A Simple Enquiry
Ten Indians
A Canary for One
An Alpine Idyll
A Pursuit Race
Today is Friday
Banal Story
Now I Lay Me
After the Storm
The Light of the World
God Rest You Merry Gentlemen
A Way You'll Never Be
The Mother of a Queen
One Reader Writes
Homage to Switzerland
A Day's Wait
A Natural History of the Dead
Wine of Wyoming
The Gambler, the Nun, and the Radio
Fathers and Sons

And if you would like to do any of the others that I signed up for - feel free to let me know and I will switch.

Thought it might be a good way to get the stories initiated and start a lot of discussion on them.

Only an idea.


Completed all of these and hope everyone has an opportunity to do so. Some were excellent reads..an interesting one was Fathers and Sons. At least, I got through the entire anthology and feel that this was an accomplishment for me. (definately Hemingway'ed out)

Message Edited by bentley on 02-28-200712:56 AM

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Anchutka
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine (The Capital of the World)

I love the story! It makes to think about illusions and death.

I was thinking, what is the difference if Paco died on the real corrida or on the pretended one? There is definitely no difference for him. His death on his own corrida was not illuminated with bright lights or glorified in newspapers. He died lonely without even a priest being on time. Hemingway wrote, “The boy Paco had never known . . . about what all these people would be doing on the next day and on other days to come. He had no idea how they really lived nor how they ended. He did not even realize they ended. He died, as the Spanish phrase has it, full of illusions. He had not had time in his life to lose any of them, nor even, at the end, to complete an act of contrition. He had not even had time to be disappointed in the Garbo picture which disappointed all Madrid for a week.” The bullfighters who died in a real corrida had their own illusions, like Joselito and Manolete who were killed in corrida. Joselito was 25, and Manolete was 30 (it was his last bullfight before retirement).
Don't we all will die in our own little corridas of our cruel reality full of our own illusions? Just like Paco did.
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bentley
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine (The Capital of the World)

[ Edited ]

Anchutka wrote:
I love the story! It makes to think about illusions and death.

I was thinking, what is the difference if Paco died on the real corrida or on the pretended one? There is definitely no difference for him. His death on his own corrida was not illuminated with bright lights or glorified in newspapers. He died lonely without even a priest being on time. Hemingway wrote, “The boy Paco had never known . . . about what all these people would be doing on the next day and on other days to come. He had no idea how they really lived nor how they ended. He did not even realize they ended. He died, as the Spanish phrase has it, full of illusions. He had not had time in his life to lose any of them, nor even, at the end, to complete an act of contrition. He had not even had time to be disappointed in the Garbo picture which disappointed all Madrid for a week.” The bullfighters who died in a real corrida had their own illusions, like Joselito and Manolete who were killed in corrida. Joselito was 25, and Manolete was 30 (it was his last bullfight before retirement).
Don't we all will die in our own little corridas of our cruel reality full of our own illusions? Just like Paco did.




Not my cup of tea...but you have given a very interesting take on the story. I wasn't pleased with the story but that is just mho. I am not sure that the story dealt only with illusions (but you are correct). What you wrote is extremely interesting. You are probably the only person who has commented on this story aside from me so I did not want to not try to respond to you for making the effort. I hope you get an opportunity to read the other stories as well. I felt very bad for Paco.

Message Edited by bentley on 04-26-200711:23 PM

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BeautifulSunday
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine (The Capital of the World)

Hi folks,

I'm new here. Nice to know ya'. I am extremely found of many works of Hemingway. "Ten Indians" is one of my favorite stories.Currently, I am searching for its English version. As living in an Asian country, i just read this story in another language rather than English. Hen, I will be glad if you guys kindly send me an English version of Ten Indians to this email lolly18@soon.com. Thanks a lot.

Regards,

BeautifulSuday
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bentley
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine (The Capital of the World)



BeautifulSunday wrote:
Hi folks,

I'm new here. Nice to know ya'. I am extremely found of many works of Hemingway. "Ten Indians" is one of my favorite stories.Currently, I am searching for its English version. As living in an Asian country, i just read this story in another language rather than English. Hen, I will be glad if you guys kindly send me an English version of Ten Indians to this email lolly18@soon.com. Thanks a lot.

Regards,

BeautifulSuday




This short story collection has the english version:

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&bnit=H&bnrefer=HEMINGWAY&EAN=9780684...

Also the book which went along with this book club also contains the story. I could not find the story itself on the internet.
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BeautifulSunday
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine (The Capital of the World)

Thank you, Bentley
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bentley
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Re: The Rest of the Forty-Nine (The Capital of the World)



BeautifulSunday wrote:
Thank you, Bentley




Your welcome BeautifulSunday..and I hope that you are having just that kind of day.

Regards,

Bentley
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