Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Frequent Contributor
Katelyn
Posts: 311
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

Whitney,
Glad you are here.. I think it is great you are interested in classics -- especially at your age...This book is a good book to get started with since it is a series of short stories... I like stories myself when busy because it takes less time to finish one...


Kate
Frequent Contributor
leakybucket
Posts: 299
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

Hi folks. Looks like I'm not too late to join this discussion. I haven't read any of Kafka but I think this is going to be a most interesting discussion. Actually, I got sold when I stumbled on this web site:

http://www.randomhouse.com/crown/metamorphosis/

Barnes & Noble have the book at (put in Kuper as a keyword if you have to search):

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&;EAN=9781400052998&itm=2

I will read it this weekend and be ready to join you next Monday.

Bucky
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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Re: Community Room



leakybucket wrote:
Hi folks. Looks like I'm not too late to join this discussion. I haven't read any of Kafka but I think this is going to be a most interesting discussion. Actually, I got sold when I stumbled on this web site:

http://www.randomhouse.com/crown/metamorphosis/

Barnes & Noble have the book at (put in Kuper as a keyword if you have to search):

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&;EAN=9781400052998&itm=2

I will read it this weekend and be ready to join you next Monday.

Bucky




Great, Bucky,
I look forward to hearing from you
Ilana



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Community Room

Great find, Bucky! Thanks!



leakybucket wrote:
Hi folks. Looks like I'm not too late to join this discussion. I haven't read any of Kafka but I think this is going to be a most interesting discussion. Actually, I got sold when I stumbled on this web site:

http://www.randomhouse.com/crown/metamorphosis/

Barnes & Noble have the book at (put in Kuper as a keyword if you have to search):

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&;EAN=9781400052998&itm=2

I will read it this weekend and be ready to join you next Monday.

Bucky


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Frequent Contributor
donyskiw
Posts: 578
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

Kate, thank you, what a nice compliment! I have to confess, I'm getting a bit tired of the excess of snow. One blizzard was fun, after the second, the novelty wore off. I'm a ski patroller and I like it in the mountains but I bought a live Colorado Blue Spruce for my Christmas tree this year (it's outside my living room window instead of inside) and I would like to plant it this Sunday. I dug the hole last month but I'm not even sure I can find it in my yard until some of this stuff melts! And it tends to get ugly and dirty in the city.

Denise
Frequent Contributor
prince_alfie
Posts: 43
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

I read all of Kafka except the Castle and a chunk of short stories. But the Trial is one of my all time favorites.
Contributor
gwenn
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

Hi, I am new to this discussion and thought the club started on Jan 8th. So I am waiting for my book to get here. I did read part of Metamorphosis years ago but did not finish it and am looking forward to reading and understanding all the discussion here. I have trouble navigating the web pages of this site so I hope I am able to send this right and to find all the posts.
Praise ignorance, for what man has not encountered he has not destroyed. -Wendell Berry
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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Re: Community Room



gwenn wrote:
Hi, I am new to this discussion and thought the club started on Jan 8th. So I am waiting for my book to get here. I did read part of Metamorphosis years ago but did not finish it and am looking forward to reading and understanding all the discussion here. I have trouble navigating the web pages of this site so I hope I am able to send this right and to find all the posts.




Hi Gwenn
I'm so glad you'll be joining us. I'm sorry that some of the discussion has started ahead of time, but just jump in when you're ready. These are all really short stories, and the discussion will go on all month
I look forward to your input
Ilana



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Reader
DavidLu
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

Hi there. I've been reading everyone's comments for days now and I'm finding all the input very interesting. However, this is my first time "chatting" and I think I need some guidance. Is there a secret to picking up where we left off each day, without having to reread all the previous comments? Thanks.
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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Re: Community Room



DavidLu wrote:
Hi there. I've been reading everyone's comments for days now and I'm finding all the input very interesting. However, this is my first time "chatting" and I think I need some guidance. Is there a secret to picking up where we left off each day, without having to reread all the previous comments? Thanks.




Hi David,
I'm glad you're joining us.
If you want to mark all the existing messages as old, and just monitor for new messages starting from today, go to the main Kafka Board, click on "board options" and then "mark all messages as read."

Another thing to play with is the "threaded" vs "linear" format in the "preferences" heading of "my profile." I like a "linear" format, with newest to oldest messages listed. What do other people like?

Ilana



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Community Room

Welcome David!

I prefer the Linear Format set with Newest to Oldest message too Ilana. I set this up in my Profile, under Preferences. This way the latest post comes up first when you Sign in and you can scroll back a bit to read the previous ones if you wish. Or there is a facility to delete all read messages - I think this is a bit risky though because you may want to recap on what someone has written. I also like the email facility which means that emails are sent to your home Inbox when someone posts to a thread you are interested in. You then 'View Message' and it takes you directly to their post. Sign in and you are away! You can set this up each time at the bottom of the posting section or permanently in your Preferences.




IlanaSimons wrote:


DavidLu wrote:
Hi there. I've been reading everyone's comments for days now and I'm finding all the input very interesting. However, this is my first time "chatting" and I think I need some guidance. Is there a secret to picking up where we left off each day, without having to reread all the previous comments? Thanks.




Hi David,
I'm glad you're joining us.
If you want to mark all the existing messages as old, and just monitor for new messages starting from today, go to the main Kafka Board, click on "board options" and then "mark all messages as read."

Another thing to play with is the "threaded" vs "linear" format in the "preferences" heading of "my profile." I like a "linear" format, with newest to oldest messages listed. What do other people like?

Ilana


New User
johncakes
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎01-02-2007
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Re: Community Room



IlanaSimons wrote:
Hi, and welcome. Use this thread for introducing yourselves and discussing anything at all outside the text.
Ilana

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-26-200612:24 PM




i'm john and just started reading kafka this month. i'm reading 'the trial' and 'meta' and hope to learn alot about him too.
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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Re: Community Room



johncakes wrote:


IlanaSimons wrote:
Hi, and welcome. Use this thread for introducing yourselves and discussing anything at all outside the text.
Ilana

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-26-200612:24 PM




i'm john and just started reading kafka this month. i'm reading 'the trial' and 'meta' and hope to learn alot about him too.


Welcome, John.
Looking forward to your words....
We aren't reading the Trial in this club, but I'd like it if you could post on our "Before the Law" thread when you get to that scene in the Trail. The short parable is an excerpted scene from the book, and your insight would help the discussion.
Ilana



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Reader
DavidLu
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

Thanks. Your suggestions are very helpful. DavidLu is not my real name; I wanted to change to a username that is more "me", but I don't think you can change your username. Please just call me Kiki.
Regarding Kafka, I do agree that your personal state of mind when you read him will definitely influence what you get out of his writing. I can relate to his feeling trapped by his responsibilities and his need to escape. The thing is...there is no real escape. Even though Gregor is changed physically and he can no longer provide, he never gains true freedom.
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Tyler Knox's KOCKROACH

In his January 7, 2007 review of Tyler Knox's novel Kockroach in The Washington Post, Ron Charles wrote

Even if you can't read, you'll enjoy the little flip-movie printed on the bottom right corner of each page that shows a cockroach transforming into Kockroach.
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?EAN=9780061143335
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Tyler Knox's KOCKROACH

Thanks pmath - I love the idea of this and will look out for it over here:smileyvery-happy:




pmath wrote:
In his January 7, 2007 review of Tyler Knox's novel Kockroach in The Washington Post, Ron Charles wrote

Even if you can't read, you'll enjoy the little flip-movie printed on the bottom right corner of each page that shows a cockroach transforming into Kockroach.
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?EAN=9780061143335


Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Tyler Knox's KOCKROACH

I laughed heartily when I first heard about it, but now I think this metamorphosis sounds more disturbing than FK's!


Choisya wrote:
Thanks pmath - I love the idea of this and will look out for it over here:smileyvery-happy:

pmath wrote:
In his January 7, 2007 review of Tyler Knox's novel Kockroach in The Washington Post, Ron Charles wrote

Even if you can't read, you'll enjoy the little flip-movie printed on the bottom right corner of each page that shows a cockroach transforming into Kockroach.
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?EAN=9780061143335

Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Tyler Knox's KOCKROACH

Well yes, considering the sorry state of the world, who would want to 'come back' as a man? I would rather be a cat in a good home anyday:smileyhappy:




pmath wrote:
I laughed heartily when I first heard about it, but now I think this metamorphosis sounds more disturbing than FK's!


Choisya wrote:
Thanks pmath - I love the idea of this and will look out for it over here:smileyvery-happy:

pmath wrote:
In his January 7, 2007 review of Tyler Knox's novel Kockroach in The Washington Post, Ron Charles wrote

Even if you can't read, you'll enjoy the little flip-movie printed on the bottom right corner of each page that shows a cockroach transforming into Kockroach.
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?EAN=9780061143335




Contributor
azarin-sadegh
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎01-22-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Hi, My name is Azarin and I am a 46 years old Iranian-American. I am a software Engineer, but my other passion is literature.

I left Iran in 1983, during Iran-Iraq war, to go to France to continue my education. About 12 years ago, I moved to US. with my family.

Kafka is one of my all time favorite authors.What I like about him, is not only his writings, or his style, or the subjects he chose, but mainly because of his deep vulnerability and the source of this deep feeling of failure.

What has always touched me is that how come a writer like Kafka that has influenced so much our modern Literature, had absolutely any kind of truthful insight or judgment regarding the value of his own work. He saw himself as a failure, in all aspects of his life, Physically he was weak, comparing with his strong healthy father. Working as a clerk in insurance companies, he felt almost like being in prison. He wasn’t married and was afraid of committing to an ordinary life, like the one everybody else had and seemed always out of reach for him. Plus, spiritually, he never could totally and fully believe in the traditional concept of God and religion and this conflict between his doubts and what he should have believed, acted as another proof of his failure.

Besides I think he believed that this imaginary dark world that he created through his works is nothing other than his own darkness. He felt lonely and lost, just because he knew he was different.

This is one of my favorite quotes of Kafka:

“By believing passionately in something that still does not exist, we create it. The nonexistent is whatever we have not sufficiently desired.”
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

Thanks for your note, Azarin. It's such a strange thing when someone else's darkness makes us feel _comfort._ But as you say, it can.
(I never quite relate when someone says, "I can't read that author--because he's so depressing." I would understand "I can't read him because he's boring" or "he's superficial," but I feel, as you say, that reading a well-articulated darkness lends a feeling of comfort.)




azarin-sadegh wrote:
Hi, My name is Azarin and I am a 46 years old Iranian-American. I am a software Engineer, but my other passion is literature.

I left Iran in 1983, during Iran-Iraq war, to go to France to continue my education. About 12 years ago, I moved to US. with my family.

Kafka is one of my all time favorite authors.What I like about him, is not only his writings, or his style, or the subjects he chose, but mainly because of his deep vulnerability and the source of this deep feeling of failure.

What has always touched me is that how come a writer like Kafka that has influenced so much our modern Literature, had absolutely any kind of truthful insight or judgment regarding the value of his own work. He saw himself as a failure, in all aspects of his life, Physically he was weak, comparing with his strong healthy father. Working as a clerk in insurance companies, he felt almost like being in prison. He wasn’t married and was afraid of committing to an ordinary life, like the one everybody else had and seemed always out of reach for him. Plus, spiritually, he never could totally and fully believe in the traditional concept of God and religion and this conflict between his doubts and what he should have believed, acted as another proof of his failure.

Besides I think he believed that this imaginary dark world that he created through his works is nothing other than his own darkness. He felt lonely and lost, just because he knew he was different.

This is one of my favorite quotes of Kafka:

“By believing passionately in something that still does not exist, we create it. The nonexistent is whatever we have not sufficiently desired.”





Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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