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IlanaSimons
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Community Room

[ Edited ]
Hi, and welcome. Use this thread for introducing yourselves and discussing anything at all outside the text.
Ilana

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-26-200612:24 PM




Ilana
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Choisya
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Re: Community Room

Hi and Happy Boxing Day! I am Choisya from Over the Pond. I am a 74 year old retired widow, living alone, 20 miles north of London, with my two cats, and I have far too much time to spare in the winter for these boards!



IlanaSimons wrote:
Hi, and welcome. Use this thread for introducing yourselves and discussing anything at all outside the text.
Ilana

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-26-200612:24 PM




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IlanaSimons
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Re: Community Room

[ Edited ]

Choisya wrote:
Hi and Happy Boxing Day! I am Choisya from Over the Pond. I am a 74 year old retired widow, living alone, 20 miles north of London, with my two cats, and I have far too much time to spare in the winter for these boards!




you make "too much time to spare" sound negative. But we need and love you, Choisya.

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-26-200603:18 PM




Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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Choisya
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Re: Community Room

Thanks Ilana - that is very kind of you:smileyhappy:

I also meant to say that I first read Kafka when I was suffering from chronic post-puerperal depression 45 years ago. At that time every word that Kafka had written resonated with me but now I find his self obsessed pessimism much less to my taste. He is, I think, an author to read when you feel alienated and lonely because he can make you feel 'there was someone who would have understood me'. He is also an author to read if you are someone who is cynical about politics and politicians, which I try not to be.



IlanaSimons wrote:

Choisya wrote:
Hi and Happy Boxing Day! I am Choisya from Over the Pond. I am a 74 year old retired widow, living alone, 20 miles north of London, with my two cats, and I have far too much time to spare in the winter for these boards!




you make "too much time to spare" sound negative. But we need and love you, Choisya.

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-26-200603:18 PM




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Katelyn
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Re: Community Room

Hi,
I was wondering what motivates the other participants in the class to read Kafka
and if anyone had any creative ideas about how to engage with the material. I mean one could have a Kafka dinner party with ones friends (I am not sure even what this would mean) but I am just throwing something out to not confine anyone's thinking. Kafka could also inspire taking photographs. Our instructor said in one of the threads something about Kafka) and how he sees conceives of things in terms of polar opposites motivated by the false dichotomies of language and thus can turn "doors" into deadends (i.e. boarded up doors); I could see how this could lead to a series of photographs. I know next to nothing about cameras, but a friend of mine has recently taken photography up and is publishing pictures (local newspaper spreads) so it might be interesting to try this myself.

Anyone else have any ideas? I don't mean to suggest that analyzing the work is not enough, but I personally just feel dead if I do too much reading and don't do somthing else with it. Maybe it is an artifact of my profession (engineering) which always makes me want to build something or maybe it is a form of rebeling against it (doing something purely creative vs. something that is methodology driven)

Any ideas anyone?

Kate
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Choisya
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Re: Community Room

I am reading Kafka here to re-acquaint myself with some stories I read when I was in the depths of depression (and in hospital) 40 years ago to see if they now affect me differently.

How about throwing a dinner party and afterwards viewing a DVD of Orson Welles in Kafka's The Trial (1962)? This film noir should make for a good discussion between your friends.




Katelyn wrote:
Hi,
I was wondering what motivates the other participants in the class to read Kafka
and if anyone had any creative ideas about how to engage with the material. I mean one could have a Kafka dinner party with ones friends (I am not sure even what this would mean) but I am just throwing something out to not confine anyone's thinking. Kafka could also inspire taking photographs. Our instructor said in one of the threads something about Kafka) and how he sees conceives of things in terms of polar opposites motivated by the false dichotomies of language and thus can turn "doors" into deadends (i.e. boarded up doors); I could see how this could lead to a series of photographs. I know next to nothing about cameras, but a friend of mine has recently taken photography up and is publishing pictures (local newspaper spreads) so it might be interesting to try this myself.

Anyone else have any ideas? I don't mean to suggest that analyzing the work is not enough, but I personally just feel dead if I do too much reading and don't do somthing else with it. Maybe it is an artifact of my profession (engineering) which always makes me want to build something or maybe it is a form of rebeling against it (doing something purely creative vs. something that is methodology driven)

Any ideas anyone?

Kate


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Laurel
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Re: Community Room


Choisya wrote:
I am reading Kafka here to re-acquaint myself with some stories I read when I was in the depths of depression (and in hospital) 40 years ago to see if they now affect me differently.

How about throwing a dinner party and afterwards viewing a DVD of Orson Welles in Kafka's The Trial (1962)? This film noir should make for a good discussion between your friends.





My cats and I watched "The Trial" the other night. They may have understood it better than I. We agreed that Anthony Perkins was certainly a cute young man. Before the film began there was a sequence about the man who waited all his life at the door that was only for him. I had a discussion with my brother about Kafka at our belated family Christmas celebration. He remarked that Kafka and H.G. Wells were perhaps saying some of the same things but Wells was able to engage a wider audience.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: Community Room

I think your cats might have been frightened by The Trial Laurel and think they would have like the vermin in Metamorphosis better in the film It's a Wonderful Life:smileyhappy:

I think your brother is right. Kafka was writing in an authoritarian country sliding into fascism, Wells was writing in a country during a time of liberalism and emerging socialism.




Laurel wrote:

Choisya wrote:
I am reading Kafka here to re-acquaint myself with some stories I read when I was in the depths of depression (and in hospital) 40 years ago to see if they now affect me differently.

How about throwing a dinner party and afterwards viewing a DVD of Orson Welles in Kafka's The Trial (1962)? This film noir should make for a good discussion between your friends.





My cats and I watched "The Trial" the other night. They may have understood it better than I. We agreed that Anthony Perkins was certainly a cute young man. Before the film began there was a sequence about the man who waited all his life at the door that was only for him. I had a discussion with my brother about Kafka at our belated family Christmas celebration. He remarked that Kafka and H.G. Wells were perhaps saying some of the same things but Wells was able to engage a wider audience.



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Laurel
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Re: Community Room

The vermin in Metamorphosis would not have a chance with my cats. Be it cockroach, grasshopper, or spider, it would be in Riley's tummy and then on the floor--or the bed, or his favorite chair.



Choisya wrote:
I think your cats might have been frightened by The Trial Laurel and think they would have like the vermin in Metamorphosis better in the film It's a Wonderful Life:smileyhappy:

I think your brother is right. Kafka was writing in an authoritarian country sliding into fascism, Wells was writing in a country during a time of liberalism and emerging socialism.




Laurel wrote:

Choisya wrote:
I am reading Kafka here to re-acquaint myself with some stories I read when I was in the depths of depression (and in hospital) 40 years ago to see if they now affect me differently.

How about throwing a dinner party and afterwards viewing a DVD of Orson Welles in Kafka's The Trial (1962)? This film noir should make for a good discussion between your friends.





My cats and I watched "The Trial" the other night. They may have understood it better than I. We agreed that Anthony Perkins was certainly a cute young man. Before the film began there was a sequence about the man who waited all his life at the door that was only for him. I had a discussion with my brother about Kafka at our belated family Christmas celebration. He remarked that Kafka and H.G. Wells were perhaps saying some of the same things but Wells was able to engage a wider audience.






"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Katelyn
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Re: Community Room



Choisya wrote:
I am reading Kafka here to re-acquaint myself with some stories I read when I was in the depths of depression (and in hospital) 40 years ago to see if they now affect me differently.

How about throwing a dinner party and afterwards viewing a DVD of Orson Welles in Kafka's The Trial (1962)? This film noir should make for a good discussion between your friends.






Choisya,
That's a good idea. I didn't think about film. Maybe I could use clear plates that would let me put Kafka pictures on the undersides that would show through. I could atleast do that for the coffee saucers or desert plates if I didn't want the dinner plates to be too eccentric and wanted to use better plates. Thanks for the idea...

Kate
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Katelyn
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Re: Community Room



Katelyn wrote:


Choisya wrote:
I am reading Kafka here to re-acquaint myself with some stories I read when I was in the depths of depression (and in hospital) 40 years ago to see if they now affect me differently.

How about throwing a dinner party and afterwards viewing a DVD of Orson Welles in Kafka's The Trial (1962)? This film noir should make for a good discussion between your friends.






Choisya,
That's a good idea. I didn't think about film. Maybe I could use clear plates that would let me put Kafka pictures on the undersides that would show through. I could atleast do that for the coffee saucers or desert plates if I didn't want the dinner plates to be too eccentric and wanted to use better plates. Thanks for the idea...

Kate





Oh, I forgot to add maybe I could do Escher place mats to keep it with a black and white theme Escher (not sure if I spelled his name right) and Kafka have something in common I think...
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IlanaSimons
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Re: Community Room



Katelyn wrote:
Oh, I forgot to add maybe I could do Escher place mats to keep it with a black and white theme Escher (not sure if I spelled his name right) and Kafka have something in common I think...




Escher and Kafka: Absolutely!
I hadn’t thought much about that before.
I just checked out this cite: http://www.mcescher.com/

These Escher quotes sound like quotes Kafka himself could have made:

"I don't grow up. In me is the small child of my early days"
"I play a tiresome game"

And they both deal with black and white, with symbolism more than realism, with stark images, and the way an artist can turn something mundane into something exaggerated and extreme.



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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donyskiw
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Re: Community Room

Your cats do better than mine. Dizzy is a terrible hunter. He can't even catch bugs.

Denise
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donyskiw
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Re: Community Room

I am Denise and I live in Colorado. I have the Everyman's edition of Kafka's complete short stories. I've read a couple of them so far but haven't started on The Metamorphosis yet.

Denise
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Laurel
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Re: Community Room



Katelyn wrote:


I could do Escher place mats to keep it with a black and white theme Escher (not sure if I spelled his name right) and Kafka have something in common I think...




Good point, Katelyn.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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topnotchgirlie88
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Re: Community Room

Hi

My name is Whitney and I am eighteen years old. Recently I decided that I wanted to be "well read" and decided I would start reading classic novels and thought that this book club would be a good way to keep up. Ya'll probably think I am a dork for being this age and interested in reading all the classics but I'm really not. I am actually a pretty busy chick who has a hobby of reading. (Don't be fooled I like to shop and hang with my friends as well.)
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Laurel
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Re: Community Room

You're in the right place, Whitney! Welcome to the club! Laurel



topnotchgirlie88 wrote:
Hi

My name is Whitney and I am eighteen years old. Recently I decided that I wanted to be "well read" and decided I would start reading classic novels and thought that this book club would be a good way to keep up. Ya'll probably think I am a dork for being this age and interested in reading all the classics but I'm really not. I am actually a pretty busy chick who has a hobby of reading. (Don't be fooled I like to shop and hang with my friends as well.)


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: Community Room

I don't think you are a 'dork' at all Whitney:smileyhappy: As Laurel said, Welcome to the club!



Laurel wrote:
You're in the right place, Whitney! Welcome to the club! Laurel



topnotchgirlie88 wrote:
Hi

My name is Whitney and I am eighteen years old. Recently I decided that I wanted to be "well read" and decided I would start reading classic novels and thought that this book club would be a good way to keep up. Ya'll probably think I am a dork for being this age and interested in reading all the classics but I'm really not. I am actually a pretty busy chick who has a hobby of reading. (Don't be fooled I like to shop and hang with my friends as well.)





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Katelyn
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Re: Community Room

Laurel and Choisya,
I am jealous of all your cats (watching movies and reading with them); my dog (who a love a lot) just barks during movies and runs to the windows. Having cats sounds very peaceful!

Kate
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Katelyn
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Re: Community Room



donyskiw wrote:
I am Denise and I live in Colorado. I have the Everyman's edition of Kafka's complete short stories. I've read a couple of them so far but haven't started on The Metamorphosis yet.

Denise



Denise,
Glad you joined us...It is nice to see a fellow Coloradoan on the boards...
I've enjoyed reading your posts as I lurked in other groups.

Kate
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