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IlanaSimons
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Join us in January

[ Edited ]
Starting in January, we'll be discussing Kafka's The Metamorphosis and Other Stories. We'll read stories like "A Hunger Artist" and "The Judgment" to explore this great absurdist voice.

Kafka is a an especially interesting artist--a visionary whose writing was so distinct that he launched a new style. It’s rare when a writer actually does this: forms a fresh lens (the "Kafkaesque" ) for seeing whole parts of our world, from bureaucracy to anorexia to death.

We'll look at his aesthetics, major ideas, and humor, always remembering that Kafka was also fantastically funny. He read his stories at night to friends, hoping-—more than anything—-that they’d laugh.

Please enjoy the other clubs in motion now, and I'll see you in January, for a discussion that promises to be fun, strange, and educating.

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-20-200605:07 PM




Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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Choisya
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Re: Join us in January

I look forward to this Ilana - Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year!




IlanaSimons wrote:
Starting in January, we'll be discussing Kafka's The Metamorphosis and Other Stories. We'll read stories like "A Hunger Artist" and "The Judgment" to explore this great absurdist voice.

Kafka is a an especially interesting artist--a visionary whose writing was so distinct that he launched a new style. It’s rare when a writer actually does this: forms a fresh lens (the "Kafkaesque" ) for seeing whole parts of our world, from bureaucracy to anorexia to death.

We'll look at his aesthetics, major ideas, and humor, always remembering that Kafka was also fantastically funny. He read his stories at night to friends, hoping-—more than anything—-that they’d laugh.

Please enjoy the other clubs in motion now, and I'll see you in January, for a discussion that promises to be fun, strange, and educating.

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-20-200605:07 PM




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holyboy
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Re: Join us in January

Wow, Kafka. I'm going to have to review to prepare. I'm looking forward to this discussion too.



IlanaSimons wrote:
Starting in January, we'll be discussing Kafka's The Metamorphosis and Other Stories. We'll read stories like "A Hunger Artist" and "The Judgment" to explore this great absurdist voice.

Kafka is a an especially interesting artist--a visionary whose writing was so distinct that he launched a new style. It’s rare when a writer actually does this: forms a fresh lens (the "Kafkaesque" ) for seeing whole parts of our world, from bureaucracy to anorexia to death.

We'll look at his aesthetics, major ideas, and humor, always remembering that Kafka was also fantastically funny. He read his stories at night to friends, hoping-—more than anything—-that they’d laugh.

Please enjoy the other clubs in motion now, and I'll see you in January, for a discussion that promises to be fun, strange, and educating.

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-20-200605:07 PM




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IlanaSimons
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Re: Join us in January



holyboy wrote:
Wow, Kafka. I'm going to have to review to prepare. I'm looking forward to this discussion too.




Great. I look forward to your input!
Ilana



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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vearnest
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Re: Join us in January



IlanaSimons wrote:
Starting in January, we'll be discussing Kafka's The Metamorphosis and Other Stories. We'll read stories like "A Hunger Artist" and "The Judgment" to explore this great absurdist voice.

Kafka is a an especially interesting artist--a visionary whose writing was so distinct that he launched a new style. It’s rare when a writer actually does this: forms a fresh lens (the "Kafkaesque" ) for seeing whole parts of our world, from bureaucracy to anorexia to death.

We'll look at his aesthetics, major ideas, and humor, always remembering that Kafka was also fantastically funny. He read his stories at night to friends, hoping-—more than anything—-that they’d laugh.

Please enjoy the other clubs in motion now, and I'll see you in January, for a discussion that promises to be fun, strange, and educating.

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-20-200605:07 PM




I,too, will have to review. Hope to join the discussion. Thanks for the oportunity.
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IlanaSimons
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Re: Join us in January



vearnest wrote:


IlanaSimons wrote:
Starting in January, we'll be discussing Kafka's The Metamorphosis and Other Stories. We'll read stories like "A Hunger Artist" and "The Judgment" to explore this great absurdist voice.

Kafka is a an especially interesting artist--a visionary whose writing was so distinct that he launched a new style. It’s rare when a writer actually does this: forms a fresh lens (the "Kafkaesque" ) for seeing whole parts of our world, from bureaucracy to anorexia to death.

We'll look at his aesthetics, major ideas, and humor, always remembering that Kafka was also fantastically funny. He read his stories at night to friends, hoping-—more than anything—-that they’d laugh.

Please enjoy the other clubs in motion now, and I'll see you in January, for a discussion that promises to be fun, strange, and educating.

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-20-200605:07 PM




I,too, will have to review. Hope to join the discussion. Thanks for the oportunity.




I'm really glad you might join us. Please don't worry that some of the discussion has already started. These are all short-ish stories, so just jump in whenever you're ready.
Ilana



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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johncakes
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Re: Join us in January

yes, i want to participate but had a question i was hoping someone smarter than me could answer... i am reading now francine prose's book "reading like a writer"... and one thing i wonder about: is this analysis of authors work always an analysis of what author intneded, or is a big part of the meaning, etc, of works also unintended and simply a function of a given writers personalities/inclinations/nature as well as his given culture and time period... sometimes i feel the person doing the analysis is attributing too much to the author, rather than viewing some of this on other factors... i just wanted a better understanding of this so that i could feel more comfortable about what we're doing..

i am now readinf kafka so that can join the discussion... but i get uncomfortable when there seems to be a tendency to attribute evry possible meaning/psychlogy/symbol, etc., to something specifically planned and intended by kafka rather than partly a function of nature/culture/society/time period... any thoughts to help my perspective and understanding would be appreciared,thank you, johncake
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gwenn
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Join us in January

I am also interested in seeing a reply to your question, it is a good one. I haven't got my book yet it should arrive by Saturday I think.
Praise ignorance, for what man has not encountered he has not destroyed. -Wendell Berry
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IlanaSimons
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Re: Join us in January

[ Edited ]

johncakes wrote:
yes, i want to participate but had a question i was hoping someone smarter than me could answer... i am reading now francine prose's book "reading like a writer"... and one thing i wonder about: is this analysis of authors work always an analysis of what author intneded, or is a big part of the meaning, etc, of works also unintended and simply a function of a given writers personalities/inclinations/nature as well as his given culture and time period... sometimes i feel the person doing the analysis is attributing too much to the author, rather than viewing some of this on other factors... i just wanted a better understanding of this so that i could feel more comfortable about what we're doing..

i am now readinf kafka so that can join the discussion... but i get uncomfortable when there seems to be a tendency to attribute evry possible meaning/psychlogy/symbol, etc., to something specifically planned and intended by kafka rather than partly a function of nature/culture/society/time period... any thoughts to help my perspective and understanding would be appreciared,thank you, johncake





Hi Johncake,
Nice questions.
I think we do and should go beyond an artist's own intentions when we ask what texts mean, or what effects they have on readers.
I like to think of the critic-as-therapist. If a client comes into a therapist's office, the therapist wants to know what's going on with this client. He looks for patterns in the guy's life: Does he wash his hands five times in the morning? Is his voice pressured and fast? What do these things show about the man and how he makes meaning?
The therapist/literary critic wants to look for the patterns in his client/book--to see how that client/book produces meaning. A lot of these patterns or behaviors are not done consciously by the client/book.
So I can say that the bug in Metamorphosis carries meaning, but it's not just the one meaning Kafka intended.
I'll be excited to hear what others have to say
Ilana

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 01-04-200704:49 PM




Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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historybuff234
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Registered: ‎02-08-2007
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Re: Join us in January

I going to out in my summer book order and included in it is the volume you people disscussed in Janurary. I hope I can still join in on the little bit of you left disscussing it.
The important thing, is to keep the important thing the important thing.
-Albert Einstein
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