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Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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#14 Luckey Quarter

What might King's reason be for spelling "luckey" incorrectly?

Do you think Darlene is on her way to the casino at the end of the story, or will she take a different route, now that she's had her premonition?

Darlene's story is sad, but likely many people across the world live in similar straits, enough money to get by, but not have anything extra. Is there a message in this story?
Stephanie
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LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: #14 Luckey Quarter

Perhaps the spelling was to emphasize the word "key" as maybe this quarter was the key to luc(k).

It was disappointing to learn that Darlene had a dream - I didn't think of it as a vision or premonition at first. I think that Darlene is going to take some of those winnings and give the casino a try.

Could SK be sending a message that you never know what life brings and sometimes you need to take a chance, although I don't think gambling is a good example of that. Maybe it's to illustrate hope. Or maybe I'm just trying to find something positive in this story of Darlene's life.
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: #14 Luckey Quarter

Liz,

I was very touched by Darlene's story, and her children - how they didn't ask for the things they wanted, because they knew those things were out of reach. I so appreciated how her daughter backpedaled immediately after she asked, "What do I get?" and she saw the look on her mother's face. I get a little choked up just thinking of it now.
Stephanie
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tonypendrey
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎11-27-2007
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Re: #14 Luckey Quarter

This is certainly one of the best examples of short story writing by any author, I have ever encountered.

I have read it many times and the final few paragraphs when Darlene is dealing with her children and thinking about her own life is just so heart-breaking but beautifully written.

The little girl's reaction when she thinks she has upset mer mum just gets me everytime too!

You genuinely want something good for Darlene and her children. And it's just a story.

Another story in "Everthing's Eventual" left me feeling the same way.
"All that you love will be carried away". At the end I was in that cold field with Albie Zimmer, wishing for something better.
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