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Amanda_R
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Registered: ‎09-25-2006
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General Discussion Topic: Blake's Work

[ Edited ]
Before reading Burning Bright, were you familiar with Blake's work? How did it color your experience of the novel?


Note: This discussion topic is suitable for any and all chapters of Burning Bright.

Message Edited by Amanda_R on 05-04-2007 08:27 AM

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LizzieAnn
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Blake's Work

I've never read any of Blake's work, although I was familiar with the name. Reading the bits in pieces within this novel has stirred an interest. I plan on reading some of his works, particularly Songs of Innocence.



Amanda_R wrote:
Before reading Burning Bright, were you familiar with Blake's work? How did it color your experience of the novel?


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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Mariposa
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Blake's Work

Before reading Burning Bright, were you familiar with Blake's work? How did it color your experience of the novel?

I have read Blake on and off for many years. I think I liked his poetry more when I was younger and now I prefer the artwork. But what really impressed me is the combination of the two...how he sets his poetry into his drawings.

I now don't believe I can isolate one from the other. I believe when you read his writing and experience the art at the same time...that is the true Blake experience. Because if he wanted the reader to experience the poems alone, he wouldn't have created the drawings.

I would have liked to have had Blake as a more central character in the book. I understand that his poetry creates the theme of the book, but I wanted to hang out with Blake. I thought that he was by far the most fascinating person in the book and personally I did not get enough of him. I saw him, I heard him talk, but I never felt who he was as much as I would have liked.

I think with Girl With a Pearl Earring I got much closer to Vermeer. I guess I wanted that experience again.

Lizabeth
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psb
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Registered: ‎02-14-2007
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Blake's Work

It was the title of Tracy Chevalier's book that drew me to it because my mother often quoted the poems she had had to learn by heart as a child and "Tyger! Tyger! burning bright" was one them. It was also a favourite choice by those who entered my school's annual voice speaking competition.

I read and enjoyed another of Tracy Chevalier's books because of the title. My husband is fond of Vermeer and he bought me a copy of "Girl with a Pearl Earring" as a present.
nur
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nur
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Registered: ‎05-11-2007
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Blake's Work

I have not read the book yet :-) but I am familiar with Blake's work. Actually, I took a class on Blake's poems and art. I can not wait till I start this book!

I am in love with Tracy's descriptive and detailed style: you really feel like you are there with the characters and see,hear,feel their experiences!

Nur
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TinaSChang
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Blake's Work

I'm an avid Blake fan having read tons of his work including lesser known long poems. I almost feel like he is a prophet.

Of course this makes me a tough but eager reader: perhaps as risky a reviewer as a Christian commenting on "The Passion of Christ". So far I am pleased with the description of Blake!
Tina S. Chang
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JulieZ
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Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Blake's Work

I had not heard of William Blake when I started reading Burning Bright, and at first I thought I might be missing something as I read the book, thinking I might understand his character better if I was familiar with his poetry and art. But I have learned a lot about him in this book, and the other day, I saw a friend of mine carrying an anthology containing some of his poems. I read the poems in her book, one of which is actually quoted in Burning Bright, and they reaffirmed what the book has taught me about him, rather than providing new insights. Tracy Chevalier has done a wonderful job of creating a character whose vague personality suggests his existing poetry and art.

I especially enjoyed the poem quoted in Burning Bright about the newborn baby.

I'm also interested in learning more about Phillip Astley after reading Burning Bright.
Julie
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