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Amanda_R
Posts: 203
Registered: ‎09-25-2006
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General Discussion Topic: Meeting William Blake

[ Edited ]
William Blake's first two appearances in the novel are quite striking -- first, in his bonnet rouge on page 19, and then when Jem and Maggie spy on him having sex in his backyard (page 27). What significance does this have for him as a character? What did you expect of him after these prominent glimpses?


Note: This discussion topic is particularly suitable for the early/middle chapters of Burning Bright.

Message Edited by Amanda_R on 05-04-2007 08:14 AM

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LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Meeting William Blake

I think it's to illustrate that William Blake is anything but ordinary. He's a character who will do and/or say the unexpected. Conventions mean nothing to him - he's ruled by his own feelings. I anticipated strong feelings and convictions from this man as well as an unexpectedness.
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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maxcat
Posts: 4,012
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Meeting William Blake

I get the impression he's a free spirit and does what he wants to do. He's bold and brash and maybe that comes out in his works. I've never read any of them so maybe I'm being forward here.
The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Meeting William Blake



maxcat wrote:
I get the impression he's a free spirit and does what he wants to do. He's bold and brash and maybe that comes out in his works. I've never read any of them so maybe I'm being forward here.





Yes, he does seem to be his own man. He doesn't do things because its proper or whatever, he does them when the whim hits him. In other words, he seems not to care what others think of him. I like reading about him even though I haven't read any of his work either.
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Mariposa
Posts: 133
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Meeting William Blake

If anyone is interested in learning more about Blake, perhaps going to this site and seeing his work is a way of meeting him:


http://www.blakearchive.org/blake/main.html


Lizabeth
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TinaSChang
Posts: 20
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: General Discussion Topic: Meeting William Blake

As an avid Blake fan who knew about these two aspects of his life already (naked activities in the backyard and revolutionary support), I thought it was a clever and realistic way to introduce him. This is the perspective of his neighbors and so they see this side of him before reaching his poetry.

I also liked the discussion between Maggie and her father in the pub regarding "Paradise Lost" and the quote from that poem. In essence it captures an essential part of Blake's vision using a more well known work of literature. Slipping in the brief description of his copper plates and printing process is also nicely done.

I'm wondering, as an author, did you think carefully over all the aspects of Blake's personality and the order in which it should be presented, and then design the story to fit this narrative structure? Or at least arrange the opening of the novel to achieve this effect?
Tina S. Chang
Science and Math Fiction

http://profiles.yahoo.com/tinaschangsf

tinaschangsf@yahoo.com
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