Month of Sundays, by Yolanda Wallace, has a cover that combines two images into one to create a moment. Here she is to talk about the design process from her vantage point:

 

"The theme of the book is food as a form of seduction, so I definitely wanted a romantic meal to be featured on the cover. When I was presented with the cover choices, however, I was amazed the artist--who hadn't read a word of the manuscript at that point--chose to highlight sushi, which plays a rather prominent role in one of the, shall we say, more intimate scenes in the book. I guess great minds think alike!

"Each time I submit a manuscript, I always try to paint as clear a picture of the novel as possible in the accompanying proposal. That way, both the publisher and the cover department can get an accurate feel for the finished product. We also share ideas about what we think should and shouldn't be on the cover, which makes crafting the final version less of a headache for everyone involved.

"The first word that came to mind the first time I saw the cover was awesome. The second was perfect. The image on the cover perfectly portrays what is detailed inside--two women finding love, adventure, and several really good meals on a culinary trip around the world.

"Bold Strokes Books is wonderful. Authors are allowed--encouraged, really--to share ideas through all stages of the process from conception to final version. We make all sorts of decisions for covers, including image, font size, and color. It's quite a collaborative process. Each time I make a suggestion, I know it will be given careful consideration. The turnaround for changes is incredibly fast. I make a suggestion and I receive the updates a day or two later. If only I could complete my edits just as quickly.

"This cover didn't require a single change. I received the test proof, took one look at it, and decided not to change a thing. With my previous covers, I've changed colors, fonts, or images, but this one felt right from the beginning.

"The image of the women was a stock photo the art department found that captured the feeling of the book. The framed menu was as well, but both images seemed made for each other. Fitting, considering they're now gracing the cover of a romance novel.

"I adore the cover and I've had several people tell me they bought the book based on the cover alone without reading the synopsis on the back. The cover artist definitely made life easy for me on this one. Each time I look at the cover, I feel transported. I remember the journey I made creating the characters in the book and I want to make a return visit to their lives. Hopefully, readers will feel the same way. As for hidden meaning, yes, I do find some. As authors, we use words to paint images, so the frame on the cover reminds me to make those images as rich and colorful as I can. They say a picture speaks a thousand words. In my case, a cover speaks nearly seventy times that many because its image perfectly illustrates the story depicted inside."

Thanks, Yolanda! I think the Month of Sundays cover is an interesting combination of images. So many covers now go for one simple visual but this one requires a little more looking, a little more contemplation of what the novel might be about.

 

 

What do you guys think of this cover?

 

 


Melissa Walker is the author of six Young Adult novels, the latest of which is Unbreak My Heart (pictured). Her author blog, where Cover Stories originated, is melissacwalker.com. Follow her on Twitter @melissacwalker.

 

 

Keep up with all of my blogs – as well as all of Barnes & Noble’s exclusive reviews, authors interviews, videos, promotions, and more – by following @BNBuzz on Twitter!

 

 

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