A reader in Danby, VT writes:
What's my first edition "Da Vinci Code" worth?

B&N responds:

First you'll need to make sure it's a true first edition. The Da Vinci Code has many "tells" or "points" that will help you gauge its authenticity. First and foremost is the copyright page. This page will actually state that it's a First Edition and it will reflect the date of April 2003. Also, the number line will be complete and must read as follows: 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1. The other big indicator of a true first edition occurs on page 243 where the word "Scotoma" is misspelled as "Skitoma". This error was corrected in later editions. If these points are in order, your copy -- with the cover intact and depending on the condition -- would fetch anywhere from $50.00 to $300.00. A signed first edition of The Da Vinci Code is worth anywhere from $600.00 to $1000.00 in today's marketplace.

 

Wondering what one of your books is worth? Feel free to PM me through My Profile Page.


Comments
by Moderator dhaupt on ‎04-17-2009 12:53 PM
Wow, here I was all excited. But alas mine's not a first edition ;-(
by Zestforever on ‎04-19-2009 09:09 PM
What is my first American Edition of "Out of Africa" worth?
by on ‎04-20-2009 10:24 AM

Hi Zestforever,

 

Depending on condition, and if the dustjacket is intact, it's worth anywhere between $300-$600. An exceptionally clean copy could fetch over $1000.00.

 

Published here in 1938, both the copyright page and jacket should state "First Edition". If not price-clipped, the dustjacket should also carry a $2.75 retail price.

 

Incidentally, the British Edition, which pubbed the year before, is worth about $2000-$3000.

 

Best,

 

Paul

 

 

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