Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

SPOILER: CHAPTERS 16 to first of 20

This post is about things after chapter 15, so again, just a notice that if you are not on chapters 16-, then you may not want to read further.

Jurgis has now had his first taste of jail and also the court systems, where only those with money have a chance of even being heard. Something, that even today may hold true depending on the reason you are in court. Some areas, you find more justice than others. For something I had to do once, I didnt even have a lawyer and faired better and faster than I had hoped for. But here is the judicial system at its worse.

With everything that has happened to Jurgis thus far and his family and still his newness to it all, I think the lines at the end of chapter 17 sum it up well."-he could not say that it was the thing men have called 'the system' that had bought up the law of the land, and had dealt out their brutal will to him from the seat of justice. He only knew that he was wronged..". Its hard to fight what you do not know or understand and Sinclair paints a vivid argument against the old saying, "what you dont know cant hurt you", or "ignorance is bliss". It is in fact often cruel.

In chapters 18 and 19,two more horrendous situations face Jurgis s he gets out of jail. The loss of his home. The home was not just a place of shelter from the weather but this was a huge symbol of "the American dream". This was his base,his shelter from the outside world, his own kingdom for his family. From here,he would march out into the world to fight another day. This was the glue for his family staying together and now its gone and everything it took to get it, for nothing. Dreams die hard and the parts of them that represent Hope, once lost bring devastation. As if this were not bad enough, then there is the poor pathetic plight of Ona. Just as Jurgis arrives where she is, is the heartwrenching scene, one played out so many times in history, where there are poor and no one of common knowledge can help. It nearly drives the man mad. With no such relief as real madness after Ona's death, Jurgis turns to the one thing he knows to try to sedate his feelings, "How much is the bottle" he said. I want to get drunk."

Sinclair's descriptive style of writing is wonderful in the world of books. As vivid as he can paint the stomach turning sights and sounds of the slaughterhouse, he also brings you right into the feelings of his characters and helps you see as they do. A terribly important ability if one is trying to write about the plight of the poor immigrant and have it touch the hearts of the wealthier Americans enough to make them see changes must happen. In 20, we see him, once again, out to find work, to try to do something to save whats left for him to make sense of.

To me,this book has three sections to it, or three stories if you will. Some who have read through it previously posted earlier that parts they did not like or find worth reading. I think some of that comes from this three in one effect. The end of chapter 20 and beginning of 21, start a new part in Jurgis' life and learning, so I well remark about that chapter and some to follow separately from this.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: SPOILER: CHAPTERS 16 to first of 20

Thanks for this insightful post Vivico.



vivico1 wrote:
This post is about things after chapter 15, so again, just a notice that if you are not on chapters 16-, then you may not want to read further.

Jurgis has now had his first taste of jail and also the court systems, where only those with money have a chance of even being heard. Something, that even today may hold true depending on the reason you are in court. Some areas, you find more justice than others. For something I had to do once, I didnt even have a lawyer and faired better and faster than I had hoped for. But here is the judicial system at its worse.

With everything that has happened to Jurgis thus far and his family and still his newness to it all, I think the lines at the end of chapter 17 sum it up well."-he could not say that it was the thing men have called 'the system' that had bought up the law of the land, and had dealt out their brutal will to him from the seat of justice. He only knew that he was wronged..". Its hard to fight what you do not know or understand and Sinclair paints a vivid argument against the old saying, "what you dont know cant hurt you", or "ignorance is bliss". It is in fact often cruel.

In chapters 18 and 19,two more horrendous situations face Jurgis s he gets out of jail. The loss of his home. The home was not just a place of shelter from the weather but this was a huge symbol of "the American dream". This was his base,his shelter from the outside world, his own kingdom for his family. From here,he would march out into the world to fight another day. This was the glue for his family staying together and now its gone and everything it took to get it, for nothing. Dreams die hard and the parts of them that represent Hope, once lost bring devastation. As if this were not bad enough, then there is the poor pathetic plight of Ona. Just as Jurgis arrives where she is, is the heartwrenching scene, one played out so many times in history, where there are poor and no one of common knowledge can help. It nearly drives the man mad. With no such relief as real madness after Ona's death, Jurgis turns to the one thing he knows to try to sedate his feelings, "How much is the bottle" he said. I want to get drunk."

Sinclair's descriptive style of writing is wonderful in the world of books. As vivid as he can paint the stomach turning sights and sounds of the slaughterhouse, he also brings you right into the feelings of his characters and helps you see as they do. A terribly important ability if one is trying to write about the plight of the poor immigrant and have it touch the hearts of the wealthier Americans enough to make them see changes must happen. In 20, we see him, once again, out to find work, to try to do something to save whats left for him to make sense of.

To me,this book has three sections to it, or three stories if you will. Some who have read through it previously posted earlier that parts they did not like or find worth reading. I think some of that comes from this three in one effect. The end of chapter 20 and beginning of 21, start a new part in Jurgis' life and learning, so I well remark about that chapter and some to follow separately from this.


Users Online
Currently online: 52 members 245 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: