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WalterIsaacson
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎04-18-2007
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Re: Einstein's Uncertainty

I think the age of Einstein's great discoveries, 1905-1921, were a period of great imaginative and creative leaps in all fileds: music (Stravinsky and Schoenberg), art (Picasso), literature (Prosut, Jyoce), as well as in science. I believe we are not in such a period these days. However, the birth of the digital revolution in the 1990s has set the stage for what may be another such creative boom in technology and digital entertainment, and that may be reflected in science at some point. The next big leap, I think, will come when experimental data reveals whether string theory or other such attempts at a theory of everything show promise or not.
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KathyH
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Registered: ‎11-25-2006
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Re: Einstein's Uncertainty

Walter -

Thank you for your comments. That's the direction I'm going with my reading. A review/commentary on this book in the Houston Chronicle and your article in Time, both dated April 2007, encouraged me, too.

So far, Einstein's experiences, outlook, imagination, comfort/discomfort places, etc. have all been interesting, challenging (to me as I look at my experiences, outlook, imagination, etc.) and encouraging.

All this and physics, too!

KathyH
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Re: Einstein's Uncertainty

[ Edited ]

WalterIsaacson wrote:
I think the age of Einstein's great discoveries, 1905-1921, were a period of great imaginative and creative leaps in all fileds: music (Stravinsky and Schoenberg), art (Picasso), literature (Prosut, Jyoce), as well as in science. I believe we are not in such a period these days. However, the birth of the digital revolution in the 1990s has set the stage for what may be another such creative boom in technology and digital entertainment, and that may be reflected in science at some point. The next big leap, I think, will come when experimental data reveals whether string theory or other such attempts at a theory of everything show promise or not.




Thank you. To my best knowing I discovered one British scientist with an interesting approach to this subject of advancing the thoughts (of Einstein) in the field of theory of everything. His background is in computer science (and mysticism). David Bohm urged him to continue his work.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Bohm


He published a book a couple of years ago but it seems that not many mainstream scientists of today understand its implications. He recently withdrew and discontinued his site, realizing the timing is perhaps not yet right. The theories have a tendency to grow ad hoc, rather than starting afresh, finding a new creative approach to rethink the 'unknown' and in so doing incorporate what we already know. There is a paradox at play, what we already know can become our greatest hindrance in discovering new fields. Some innovative discoveries happened by 'mistake' (i.e. Fleming) not by pointed effort (for lack of a better word).

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 05-18-200704:12 AM

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rhubbell
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Registered: ‎06-16-2007
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Re: Questions for Walter Isaacson



Jessica wrote:

Do you have a question for Walter, not related to any of the discussion topics?

Reply to this message to start the conversation.





Jessica wrote:

Do you have a question for Walter, not related to any of the discussion topics?

Reply to this message to start the conversation.



First, thanks for a wonderful book. Although I have read much about Einstein, your biography presented him in a more fully human way than anything else I have read. The science discussions were first rate and very clear. I have recommended the book to a number of friends.

The photo on the inside binding of the book is poignant - Einstein at a distance walking away from the viewer as the path ahead of him veers out of the frame, then back into view. Seems like a metaphor for the struggles and false starts of the second half of his life. I cannot find the credit for the photo listed in the book, but it looks like others taken by Esther Bubley. I would like to purchase the photo, but have searched Getty Images, Corbis etc. with no luck.

Thanks in advance of any help.
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