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kate12345
Posts: 71
Registered: ‎05-12-2008
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AAAHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!

I'm writing my second book and I'm really taking this one seriously(as in I may consider publishing someday). But I have been getting so frustrated about how I want to start it. I think I have started over about four times and I still don't feel that anyone of them are what I truely want. So for the last week and a half I have had the worst case of writers block and it is really driving me crazy. Anyone else ever have this problem? If so got any ideas of how to get me out of this? haha
 
Thanks alot
 
          
Kate : )
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dragonastia
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎06-24-2007
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Re: AAAHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!

At the moment, if the beginning is completely hindering the rest of your story, try writing for five minutes about anything and everything that comes into your mind. If you aren't thinking of anything, write "I'm not thinking of anything" until you do think of something. You can also walk away from the story, and then come back after a week and try to write again.
    HOwever, if the beginning is getting you to where you want to be for the resst of the book you aare trying to write, just go with it. Write until you are finished and then don't touch a thing. Walk away for a few days to a few weeks, and then go back and revise. Otherwise, you may just keep revising and revising until you don't want to write anymore, period. I know this will happen because I wrote a novel and was 16 chapters into it, when I decided to read it over, find out where I was in the plot, and fix any mistakes. I worked it completely over four times before I stopped halfway through the fifth round and I gave up. Haven't touched it since.
    I've started a new novel and I got stuck. But i walked away for two months (LONG TIME) and I found that I had a great way to continue. These are some suggestions. Good Luck!
Matthew Renivan
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Clippership14
Posts: 382
Registered: ‎07-12-2007
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Re: AAAHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!

Yes, I have recently been faced with this same dilemma. My current project has been in the works for years and undergone four rewrites from the original. This last time around I found I didn't like putting the same chapter at the beginning which I had continued to keep at the front in every draft. I needed something different. So I had to dissect my story, outline it, do my in depth research into characters, back story, and such and lay it all out. I worked on my writing technique, read lots of books about writing technique, read lots of books by authors who write similar material to see what worked for them, and then sat down and wrote a new first chapter. It didn't sit well with me, even though I knew I had found the right point-of-view character to start with. So I rewrote it again. It still didn't flow right. I outlined that specific chapter and what goals I had for it to carry the reader into the book. That helped more. Goal setting got me out of my rut. The next time I rewrote the new chapter I grew excited about what I was writing and it showed. I've done some minor tweaking to it after that, but the main thing was that I knew what the first chapter needed to accomplish and I was excited the entire time I wrote it. I hadn't had such an adrenaline rush in a long time! As for the first original chapter, it's been drastically reworked too and it's now the sixth chapter in the book.
 
    Writer's block is a personal thing, just like writing when inspiration comes easily. Without having read your book it's hard to offer suggestions, other than technical ones. So for what's it's worth, here's some things you might want to think about when composing that first chapter (or even the first few). I've picked these up from actual people in the writing profession.
 
1) Your first chapter is where you spell out your narrative strength. Do you know who your point-of-view character(s) are? How strong is your narrative voice for these characters?
2) Your first line is crucial, the most crucial line in the entire manuscript. Does it intrigue readers into wanting to read more? Does your first line make them ask questions like: What is happening? Why did they say that? What happens next? Visit your library or bookstore and browse a bit. Take down books at random from the shelves and just read their first lines. Do they make you want to read more? If so, the first line has done its job.
3) Don't drop your reader's attention after the first line! Never begin a novel with mood setting, such as weather, back story, etc. Straight action isn't necessarily the way to go either unless there is something strange about it that will add to the plot. Avoid back story like the plague for the first fifty pages of your novel! Back story turns off most readers and makes them feel comfortable about putting the book down.
4) Always keep tension going (whether positive or negative). You don't want to lose the reader's interests. You want them to keep reading. Don't be afraid to throw the reader right into the middle of the central conflict or problem of the book. Learn to bridge conflict from the beginning until you reach your first climax or big moment.
5) Give your reader a reason to care about the protagonist and the conflict. Getting readers to identify and sympathize with your protagonist right at the start is another crucial element to writing a good beginning. How can your protagonist show one or more of their great strengths right at the beginning?
6) Why does your protagonist care about what the central problem or conflict is? How do they show it?
7) Don't be predictable. Write the scene or chapter then rewrite it going in opposite directions. The first way a scene is written is the most predictable option usually.
8) Prologues used as grabber scenes aren't always the most effective. Usually names are omitted and something shocking occurs. The problem is the reader doesn't identify with the people involved or the problem very well.
9) Write with passion. If you find you don't put your heart into what you are writing, change it until you do.
10) And if all else fails, write down your goals for the beginning of your book. What do you want to reveal, what do you want to hold back? What does your first chapter need to accomplish? Does it do that? How can you make it better?
 
I hope this helps some.
 
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Oceandweller777
Posts: 162
Registered: ‎08-09-2007
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Re: AAAHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!

My advice is move past the beginning.  I figure you read a book forwards when you're trying to discover things, but you write it backwards because you know everything when you start. 
   I get stuck a lot of times with the beginning of the story.  I put so much effort into tweaking the concept and where I'm going to put hints so things make sense later on that I lose interests and the papers get stuck in some obscure folder with the rest of the writing I'll stumble upon someday when I'm cleaning the attic. 
  If you're having trouble, skip it.  Come back when you have a better feel for it.
~Phill
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CuzEveryoneLovesACullen
Posts: 102
Registered: ‎05-31-2008
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Re: AAAHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!

If you know where you want the rest of the story to go, write the rest of the story and go back and write the beginning.  I've done this with a few of the things I have written, and they are better than the ones I wrote straight through.  One of my favorite authors, Stephenie Meyer, wrote her first bestseller this way...she started with a scene in the middle of the book, wrote through until the end, and then went back and filled in the gaps.
 
I hope this helps!
xXxXxXxXx
If we know the way we're gonna die, through all the rest we will survive ~The Academy Is... LAX to O'Hare
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kate12345
Posts: 71
Registered: ‎05-12-2008
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Re: AAAHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!

Thanks you guys for all the advice it really helped alot. I just actually came up with a new begining. I decided that I knew how I wanted it to start. I just couldn't find the words to put it in, but I think I have come up with something pretty good. I probably won't keep it the exact way it is right now. It's a start atleast...
Kate : )