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chad
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Victor Frankenstein

I had read "Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus" and it is a good example of a character that has desires beneath the sole desire to create the monster. People seemed a little confused by Victor's creation. But people generally are confused when a monster is created- they tend to question "why?" or look for causes.

Chad
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bjstitches
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Re: Plot: Desire and Conflict



BookClubEditor wrote:

Think of one of your favorite fictional protagonists and tell us what you think this character's desire is. Do you think this story would be
just as interesting without this character's conflict? And even though desire is what fuels fictional characters, is this true of people in real life?



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Desire is what makes the world go around, what gets us out of bed everyday to do things, while conflict is what keeps us from becoming bored with everything coming too easy. It’s the same way with fiction. Only very small children want the story where everything happens perfectly and ends with happily ever after. Sweet but boring and they grow tired of this kind of writing quickly as they grow up.

I know I should have written about a favorite protagonist but I just couldn’t chose one, sorry.

~BJ
"leave out the parts people skip"- Elmore Leonard
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Glassslipper
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Re: Claire from Outlander



Brandi_R wrote:


Bonnie824 wrote:
One of my favorite character's from one of my favorite books. Her initial desire is to go home- back to her own time. The conflicts that keep her from this are staying alive, and then falling deeply in love. So then she has two conflicting desires, followed by a pregnancy she's afraid to carry in the dangerous time she was in.




And even though I loved the romatic tension and historical detail, the conflict made the story what it was.




This has such a great blend of external conflict (getting back to her own time, the desire to stay alive) and also internal conflict (falling in love and not wanting to leave as a result). You point out that the desires are conflicting and this is key. When one’s desires are in conflict it can cause the character’s actions and reactions to create additional conflict. Acting in a way that works to fulfill one desire can put up more obstacles for the other desire.




This is one of my all time FAVORITE book series. I have atleast 2 dog earred paperback copies of each book - and one of Outlander chewed by a friends dog!!! But also have all the books - hard cover - in their original jackets - signed by Diana Gabaldon. My husband got them for me! I just loved the depth of the world Diana brings you into in this series. What captivated me was my own reaction to the story. I wanted Claire to stay with Jamie - which is really wanting a married women to choose not to go to her rightful husband! Who would have thunk. (although it became a pattern - because in Bridges of Madison County - I wanted Meryl Streep to go to Clint Eastwood too! - what's going on here! D: ) Really - the series is very good. Can't wait for next book.
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Glassslipper
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Re: Plot: Desire and Conflict



mae-V wrote:
A story I'm currently listening to has one of my favorite characters. Her desire was originally to survive being bullied. She is a bookish, geekish type and bullied by other girls. Her younger sister has to help her out. When she got her desire met it wasn't in the way she had envisioned. She did it by becoming fearless rather than by becoming a bully herself.

The story is written for children and her process, while magical in some ways, mirrors how the task might be done. The attacks just roll off of her allowing her to stand her ground.

Would the story be just as interesting without the desire to stand up to bullying? No. The whole point was that Nita acquired a sense of fearlessness without giving up her bookish, geekishness. That empowered her to accomplish something greater. Her fearlessness, or rather her willingness to face fear and act anyway, shapes the rest of her life. She finds her calling in it.

Does desire fuel real life people? Of course it does. It may come in different words and be more or less attractive to others, and yet it does fuel us. We desire comfort and love and companionship. Or solitude and wisdom and accomplishment. My greatest desire is to understand. When I am frustrated I can usually trace it back to a lack of understanding about the situation, or my inablity to get someone else to understand. My life's subtext, unconscious for the most part, has been communication and how it works (or doesn't).




Desire - Interesting word - isn't it. I read another interesting book - much less fantasy and romance, much more real world - and much much more soul searching and morality checking by the reader. The book is My Sister's Keeper by Jody Piccoult - and is about a young girl who was 'cultivated' by her parents and given birth to be the 'donor' to her sister to help her sister's illness and requires hospital time and bodily sacrifices by the donor daughter. The daughter "desires" to no longer be her sister's donor... quite a read. You think you have the ansewr before you start reading this story - but think again - its not an easy concept. Desire comes in many forms.
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