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Sookie, despondent over the rules and regimes of paranormal society, and rejecting the advances of her many suitors which include prominent werewolves, vampires, & jackals, takes her own life by overdosing on sleeping draught.


The queen of nursery rhymes takes on R.L. Stine.  Here’s one example:

As I was going to St. Ives,
I met a man with seven wives.
Each wife had seven flies,
Each fly had seven eyes,
Each eye had seven warts.
Flies, eyes, warts and wives,
How many were going to St. Ives?

Message Edited by PaulH on 02-24-2009 08:19 AM
Classic chldren's book about the dangers of food poisoning. (The rare first edition was scratch and sniff...)
Message Edited by PaulH on 02-24-2009 08:22 AM
Categories: title to title

Just before dawn one winter's morning, a hijacked jetliner explodes above the English Channel. Through the falling debris, two self-proclaimed New York City shopaholics – Ally and Erica – fall from the sky and miraculously wash up on the snow-covered sands of an English beach clutching their credit cards. Through a series of surreal metamorphoses, dreams and revelations, they find enlightenment in a small shop selling designer handbags.

Message Edited by PaulH on 02-24-2009 08:24 AM

Gone with the Wind in the Willows

Ashley Mole and Rat Butler sit on the verandah of Toad Hall enjoying a mint julep. . . .
Message Edited by PaulH on 02-24-2009 08:25 AM

 

 

Recently discovered diaries of Benjamin Franklin’s daughter tell of her forbidden romance with the young Afghani who helped with Franklin’s early efforts to harness electricity. 

Message Edited by PaulH on 02-24-2009 08:31 AM
Categories: title to title

 

            Impoverished bookseller/biographer Margaret Lea is shipwrecked on Lake Windermere, en route to visit reclusive author Viola Winter, and washes up on the shores of Illyria, the Duke Orsino’s Yorkshire estate.  The Duke, his brain and vision addled by absinthe, is convinced Margaret is his long-lost son, Cesario.  Viola Winter, addled by senility, is equally convinced Margaret is her estranged daughter, Olivia.

            With visions of inheritances dancing in her head, Margaret attempts to play both parts for both potential benefactors. The pot is sweetened even more when the Daily Mail offers her a tidy sum for revealing the secrets of her rich and famous would-be parents, but the payoff is dependent on her meeting a deadline that is just twelve days – and thirteen nights –away.

Message Edited by PaulH on 02-24-2009 08:30 AM

The Turn of the Shrew

Kate refuses to marry Petruchio, the suitor her father has chosen for her. Wanting to escape the tauntings of her sister Bianca, she runs away to the city and hires herself out as governess to the wards of an intriguing bachelor who keeps the children at his country estate and does not want to be bothered by them. What happens next is anybody's guess.
Message Edited by PaulH on 02-24-2009 08:15 AM

One Hundred Yankee Years of Solitude

Many years later, as he faced the media, Joe Torre was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover baseball. At that time the Bronx was a village of twenty adobe houses, built on the bank of the Hudson river of clear water that ran along a bed of polished stones, which were white and enormous, like prehistoric eggs.
Message Edited by PaulH on 02-23-2009 09:48 AM

Mashups Go Mainstream (kind of)

Take a look at this NY Times' article. Gotta love the cover. Pride and Prejudice and Zombies  
Message Edited by PaulH on 02-23-2009 09:01 AM
Once upon a time and a very good time it was there was a moocow coming down along the road and this moocow that was coming down along the road met the rented Toyota, driven with such impatient exuberance by The Senator, speeding along the unpaved unnamed road, taking the turns in giddy skidding slides, and then the car had gone off the road and had overturned in black rushing water, listing to its passenger's side, rapidly sinking.
     Am I going to die?—like this?
     O, the wild rose blossoms
     On the little green place.

His father told him that story; his father looked at him through a glass; he had a hairy face. His face was hairy to hide his identity, because a nicens little boy saw him drag the body down the road where Betty Byrne lived; she sold lemon platt. He buried the body there.
Message Edited by PaulH on 02-24-2009 08:34 AM
Performed by The Speckled Band (featuring Clipse)

Thank you for being a colleague

Went off some falls, stopped the redheaded league

Your heart is true; you're a pal and a confidant. 



And if you threw a party 
Invited everyone you ever knew 

You would see the biggest gift would be from me 

And the card attached would say,
"My dear Holmes, heat it, it turns gluish.
"You get paper, it seems you get foolish.
Take it to Jacob and play, 'Which hue's the bluest?' "
Thank you for being a fiend.
Message Edited by PaulH on 02-24-2009 08:33 AM

The Telltale Tart: Martha Stewart investigates when a dead body is found by Poe's grave, and the coroner finds that the victim choked to death -- on a cherry tart!

 

The Girl with the Tatooine Dragon: The story of the girl Luke Skywalker left behind, and the dragon who saved her.

 

Pride and Prepositions: Lynne Truss is back!

 

Pudd'nhead Wilson's War:  Pudd'n head Wilson heads back to court, as Tom Sawyer takes on Huck Finn in the battle for America's Top Mark Twain Character.

Message Edited by PaulH on 02-24-2009 08:36 AM
Categories: title to title

Ang Lee May Direct "Life of Pi" Adaptation

Variety reports that director, Ang Lee might tackle bringing Yann Martel's Life of Pi to the big screen.

 

I can't even begin to imagine how one would go about adapting the book to film. Can you?

 

Does Lee turn to CGI a la The Hulk?

On the Road

Were I to make Kerouac's classic novel into a film, first and foremost, I'd set it in the current day. Sal Paradise, played by the ever-youthful Tobey Macquire sets out from New York City, literally from the Ground Zero site, to "find" what's left of the American ideal in a time of economic depression, war in the Middle East, and a general lack of faith in mankind. Accompanying Sal is the anti-authoritarian, Dean Moriarity, played by Viggo Mortensen. Sal and Dean crisscross the country stopping in the ravaged remains of New Orleans, racing to avoid 1000 plus acre fires in California, and ultimately losing their car at gunpoint in Las Vegas. Like the novel, Sal finds some happiness, but in the end, is mainly left dejected by modern America.

 

Too dark and apocalyptic? What would you do different?

Categories: casting books

Adam and Eve, recently expelled from Eden, go on a massive 3 day bender!

 

If Ray Milland plays the role of Adam and Jane Wyman assumes the role of Eve, does the proverbial snake than play Howard Da Silva's part as the bartender? Talk about temptation! The apple then becomes a tumbler of whisky?


Message Edited by PaulH on 02-19-2009 09:09 AM

Harry Potter meets Harry Bosch

Bosch reopens an investigation into the whereabouts of a missing boy with a peculiar scar on his forehead.

 

Who is the boy?

 

Has he been abducted?

 

Why can't Bosch locate the boy's parents?

 

And what's a Hogwarts and could it be a clue?

Message Edited by PaulH on 02-23-2009 03:56 PM

Robert Louis Stevenson and Robert B. Parker

Dr. Spenser and Mr. Hawk solve crimes in downtown Boston while attempting to control their own inner demons.

 

Though never actually seen together, Spenser and Hawk are reported to be two separate people, but are they? 

 

Susan Silverman, Spenser's love interest and a lawyer by trade, has become wary of her beau. His violent outbursts are becoming more frequent and who is this Mr. Hawk character he keeps talking about? 

 

 When Mr. Hawk is accused of trampling a small girl, it's up to Spenser and Silverman to solve this convoluted crime. How will this one play out?

Message Edited by PaulH on 02-19-2009 09:54 AM

The Art of War and Peace by Sun Zu and Leo Tolstoy

Sun Zu comments on and criticizes the overall effectiveness of battlefield strategy in the Napoleonic Wars.

 

Were the legendary Sun Zu to show up during Napoleon's 1812 Russian Campaign, what advice would he offer both the French and the Russian armies?

 

One of Zu's most repeated maxims is "All warfare is based on deception". Does this quote resonate with Tolstoy's plot?

 

Can you directly apply any other of Zu's rules of war to Tolstoy's masterpiece?

Message Edited by PaulH on 02-19-2009 09:36 AM
Categories: title to title

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