1 Reply Latest reply on Jun 30, 2013 12:36 PM by deesy58

    WARNING:  The One I Left Behind

    BrandieC

      Today's Kindle Daily Deal is The One I Left Behind, by Jennifer McMahon.  It looked interesting, so I came over to B&N to see if the price was the same for the NOOKbook.  Both the search page and the product page showed the $1.99 price, as did the "confirm your purchase" pop-up when I bought the ebook.  However, my credit card was charged $9.68.  After an hour on the phone, including two transfers to regional management, I got them to refund the $7.69 overage, but while I was on hold, I conducted an interesting experiment.  I kept refreshing the search page for this ebook on B&N, and the price literally bounced from $1.99 to $9.68 every 15 seconds or so.

       

      The regional manager is allegedly notifying upper management of the problem with this ebook's price, but if you are interested in it and have a Kindle or the Kindle app, I suggest you purchase it from Amazon instead.

        • Re: WARNING:  The One I Left Behind
          deesy58

          BrandieC wrote:

          Today's Kindle Daily Deal is The One I Left Behind, by Jennifer McMahon.  It looked interesting, so I came over to B&N to see if the price was the same for the NOOKbook.  Both the search page and the product page showed the $1.99 price, as did the "confirm your purchase" pop-up when I bought the ebook.  However, my credit card was charged $9.68.  After an hour on the phone, including two transfers to regional management, I got them to refund the $7.69 overage, but while I was on hold, I conducted an interesting experiment.  I kept refreshing the search page for this ebook on B&N, and the price literally bounced from $1.99 to $9.68 every 15 seconds or so.

           

          The regional manager is allegedly notifying upper management of the problem with this ebook's price, but if you are interested in it and have a Kindle or the Kindle app, I suggest you purchase it from Amazon instead.


          B&N clearly has some unresolved IT problems.  A few weeks ago, the balance on my gift card decreased by almost $10 in the span of 20 seconds.  Neither the store manager or I could figure out why.  Then, a few days later, I learned that I had pre-ordered an e-book that had been converted by B&N's computer system from a pre-order to a sale during that 20-second window of time.  This happened at about Midnight Eastern time. 

           

          B&N should probably program its computers to complete these types of transactions at 3:00 AM or later Eastern Time, after stores in most of the states have closed for the day.  Programming computer software to automatically run at Midnight, when many b&m stores are still open, appears to represent a somewhat provincial view of the world.  This particular problem might occur infrequently, but why should it be allowed to occur at all?