16 Replies Latest reply on Apr 28, 2011 2:48 AM by shadowcat80

    Who Here Takes The Risk?

      So I was just casually (in the midst of this sever overhaul with Froyo and the App Store) browsing through the Pubit! section of B&N's website, and I thought I'd ask a sincere question.

       

      Has anyone here ever taken the chance and bought an ebook that was only available as an ebook? Meaning you couldn't see it in the store as a hardback/paperpack. I know as a future hope-to-be-published author that I wonder if it's economically smarter to go about publishing direct through a place like the Pubit! section is offering. Or are some of you out there like me in the sense that you like knowing it's in a hardcopy as well as online? Or does it not matter to some of you? I just kind of want to get a feel for the topic.

        • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
          LarryOnLI

          I've bought a number of books that are available only as eBooks.

           

          In fact it is beginning to look like that wave of the future is for publishers to look for and contract successful self published/ePublished authors instead of reading through submissions.

           

          So the next great author will probably self publish their work and eBook before being discovered and becoming a print author.

           

          • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
            Hypatia1

            It depends on the price, if I can read a sample, and on how well the blurb is written. If the description is poor (I have seen spelling mistakes and grammatical errors) I go no further. If the book seems interesting and it is only a few dollars I'd almost certainly take a chance. As it gets more expensive I'd decide if I wanted to download the sample and think about it. Above $10 or so I'd probably just move on to another book....

            • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
              Doug_Pardee

              Personally, I don't care if it's available in print or not. I look at the category, the cover, and the "jacket description" to see if it sounds interesting. If so, I scan the reviews and read the first page or two to see if it's reasonable-quality work.

               

              By the way, the "jacket description" is usually my first indication as to the quality of the writing. If it's poorly written, incoherent, or content-free, I won't bother going on to the reviews and the preview. I don't understand how some authors can be satisfied with a description that is anything short of compelling or is in any way defective.

               

                • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
                  LarryOnLI

                   


                  Doug_Pardee wrote:

                  Personally, I don't care if it's available in print or not. I look at the category, the cover, and the "jacket description" to see if it sounds interesting. If so, I scan the reviews and read the first page or two to see if it's reasonable-quality work.

                   

                  By the way, the "jacket description" is usually my first indication as to the quality of the writing. If it's poorly written, incoherent, or content-free, I won't bother going on to the reviews and the preview. I don't understand how some authors can be satisfied with a description that is anything short of compelling or is in any way defective.

                   


                   

                  I agree completely. I can't understand how someone can go to the effort of writing a novel and then put up an incoherent, error ridden, synopsis.

                   

                  • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
                    ABthree

                     


                    Doug_Pardee wrote:

                    Personally, I don't care if it's available in print or not. I look at the category, the cover, and the "jacket description" to see if it sounds interesting. If so, I scan the reviews and read the first page or two to see if it's reasonable-quality work.

                     

                    By the way, the "jacket description" is usually my first indication as to the quality of the writing. If it's poorly written, incoherent, or content-free, I won't bother going on to the reviews and the preview. I don't understand how some authors can be satisfied with a description that is anything short of compelling or is in any way defective.

                     


                    I have, and both my reasoning and my approach track Doug's.

                     

                    • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?

                      Doug_Pardee wrote:

                      Personally, I don't care if it's available in print or not. I look at the category, the cover, and the "jacket description" to see if it sounds interesting. If so, I scan the reviews and read the first page or two to see if it's reasonable-quality work.

                       

                      By the way, the "jacket description" is usually my first indication as to the quality of the writing. If it's poorly written, incoherent, or content-free, I won't bother going on to the reviews and the preview. I don't understand how some authors can be satisfied with a description that is anything short of compelling or is in any way defective.

                       


                       

                      I follow this protocol regardless of whether it is available in DTB form or not.  Actually, to be honest, I don't even notice if it available in that format.  It is a non-factor for me.

                      • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
                        Nevermore1

                         


                        Doug_Pardee wrote:

                        Personally, I don't care if it's available in print or not. I look at the category, the cover, and the "jacket description" to see if it sounds interesting. If so, I scan the reviews and read the first page or two to see if it's reasonable-quality work.

                         

                        By the way, the "jacket description" is usually my first indication as to the quality of the writing. If it's poorly written, incoherent, or content-free, I won't bother going on to the reviews and the preview. I don't understand how some authors can be satisfied with a description that is anything short of compelling or is in any way defective.

                         


                        Yeah, everything Doug said...

                         

                          • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
                            sisterhoney61

                            I've gotten a lot of books that are available only as e-books. I rely on the subject matter and the synopsis of the book, as well as the price, If I think that I will like, then I'll buy it.

                              • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
                                I basically follow what Doug said. If it looks interesting with a well written synopsis, I will check out the reviews, and then I'll decide if I want it. I'm more adventurous with free or library books. There is no real risk in those. If I don't like it I will just move on to the next one. All you lose is some time. Since I'm looking for books to read on my nook, I don't see the need to know if it's available in print.
                          • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
                            Colleen_Rose

                            I have. I have found several new authors I really like.  I think it is great that these authors have an opportunity to get their work out. I know one author, Amanda Hocking, has actually gotten a publishing deal dure to her popularity in e-books.

                            • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
                              CrankyBeach

                              Ditto to what the others have said; if I like the sound of the premise, AND I can read a sample, unless it cost two arms and a leg, I would be very likely to take the chance.

                               

                              Several years ago I was at a writers' conference where a New York editor (from one of the well-known and established publishing houses) said that even then, e-publishing was no longer the "poor stepchild" of the industry, and in fact she had recently signed an author whose entire 7-book e-published (i.e. self-published) backlist she then turned around and bought as well.

                               

                              Lest you think I might be making this up... the editor was the late Kate Duffy from Kensington--and her remarks were recorded, and I have the conference recordings somewhere.

                               

                              Just some food for thought on this Wednesday afternoon....

                               

                              Of course, for this to work for you, you have to have a worthy product....  :smileyhappy:

                              • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
                                Ya_Ya

                                I don't, generally.

                                 

                                But, I have trouble browsing and then purchasing ebooks in general.  Almost all of the ebooks I've bought have been because of a recommendation here, or someone posted they were reading it and I read the description and put it on my wishlist or bought on the spot.  (What I have bought are both traditionally published and self-published.)

                                 

                                With DTBs I used to go into the store with no idea what I wanted and come out with stacks of books by authors I'd never heard of, had never been recommended to me, but for whatever reason I'd picked up and thumbed through.

                                 

                                I've totally bought into electronic reading.  I'm not sold on the shopping experience yet.  I haven't figured it out yet, I guess.   

                                • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
                                  Po1gara

                                  Since purchasing my nook, I no longer care, at all, if a book is available in DTB form. I have found the use of an ereader so much more comfortable and convenient that I no longer purchase DTB's at all.:smileywink:

                                  • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?

                                    Well two things. One I'm certain samplers have noticed some of the samples aren't anything more than a page or two. Two the LendMe program is a way to allow "sampling". And three yes I've bought E-books with little worry mainly because either they're free or very low cost.

                                    • Re: Who Here Takes The Risk?
                                      shadowcat80

                                      I buy a lot of pubit titles.  There is some good authors that are using pubit and many of the titles are 99 cents