12 Replies Latest reply on Sep 6, 2010 6:24 PM by Htom_Serveaux

    Has anyone read "The Passage"?

      I'm reading it now and I just don't understand what all the excitement is about.  I'm about halfway through and I barely have any idea of what is going on.

      I think I must be getting old... :smileywink:

        • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?
          growlingraven

          I thought it was pretty good for the first 300 pages or so...then it bored me to death and I gave up.

          • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?

            I tried and tried, but just couldn't get into it. 

              • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?

                Well, I'm going to keep on slogging through it.  I'm stubborn.  If I don't like it by the time it ends I don't have to buy the rest of the trilogy.  So far it seems like a combination plate of Dean Koontz, Frank Herbert and Stephen King but nothing is really taking hold.

                  • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?
                    bklvr896

                    I enjoyed it but agree with the others, the middle was hard primarily I think because it described this new society with new names for characters etc. 

                     

                     

                    And I keep wondering, What happened to the FBI agent?

                     

                    But after I got through the middle, the back part got pretty good again.

                     

                    I will definitely pick up the next one.

                • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?

                  I've bee reading it for the last 2 weeks. It doesn't usually take me this long to read a book, even one this big. I got bored after page 280 I think and now I'm on page 562 and it has been getting better now.

                   

                  I keep wondering about the first set of characters and trying to predict the ending. 

                    • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?

                       


                      Sapphire329 wrote:

                      I've bee reading it for the last 2 weeks. It doesn't usually take me this long to read a book, even one this big. I got bored after page 280 I think and now I'm on page 562 and it has been getting better now.

                       

                      I keep wondering about the first set of characters and trying to predict the ending. 


                       

                       

                      LOL  Don't even try to predict the ending, that is just not going to happen!  :smileywink:

                       

                      I'm with bklvr on this, I'll grab the next one when it comes out.  This book is quite an exercise for the brain, that's for sure.

                        • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?

                           


                          FrogAlum wrote:

                           


                          Sapphire329 wrote:

                          I've bee reading it for the last 2 weeks. It doesn't usually take me this long to read a book, even one this big. I got bored after page 280 I think and now I'm on page 562 and it has been getting better now.

                           

                          I keep wondering about the first set of characters and trying to predict the ending. 


                           

                           

                          LOL  Don't even try to predict the ending, that is just not going to happen!  :smileywink:

                           

                          I'm with bklvr on this, I'll grab the next one when it comes out.  This book is quite an exercise for the brain, that's for sure.


                           

                          To be honest Im surprised I haven't skipped to the end as yet just so that I'll know. I will probably get the next one as well but hopefully I wil have more time

                           

                      • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?

                        I loved this book from beginning to end.  When I read the last line of the book I swore because I didn't want it to be over.

                         

                        To me, this was really two books.  The first half dealt with certain characters and I really got into their story and really felt for them.  The second half deals with a different set of characters. It took a little time to get into it but not long.  And then I really got into their story and really started to feel for them too. I thought it was a very satisfying book and I can't wait for the second one to come out.

                        • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?
                          Htom_Serveaux

                          Add me to the "Passage 300 Club", as I also bailed around page 300 when the sudden shift to the future occurred.

                           

                          While the sudden break in the story thread and the loss of all the characters I was invested in started the process of de-involvement, it wasn't that alone.  The deal breaker was the idea that this band of primitives was holding off a band or bands of the monsters (why they are referred to as "vampires" I don't know, they don't fit any definition of vampire I've encountered before).  There was some mention of a revered ancestor/founder who had (if I'm recalling correctly) successfully defended some abandoned building with a group of children or other refugees against them.

                           

                          The book's monsters had easily overcome the military defenders of the base they originated in, and then wiped out Western civilzation in what, months?  A year?  Armies and police forces couldn't stop them, but this hardy band of survivors does?  We're told their skin is stronger than Kevlar, they move too fast to be seen, fly (or leap about as if to seem to fly) etc.

                           

                          This is a common error in fantasy and science fiction novels.  The author grants their hero/monster/villian super powers in an attempt to make them awe-inspiring.  But when you give them that much power you can't create any suspense or conflict without having them act later as if they don't have these powers.  Simon Green fell into this with Edwin Drood in his "Secret Histories" series.

                           

                          So that ended it for me.

                           

                          At least Mr. Cronin can put a sentence together, unlike some other recent "blockbuster" authors *cough* Stephanie Myers *cough*, and if he does something outside the realm of this series I'll sure give it a look.

                            • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?

                               


                              Htom_Serveaux wrote:

                              Add me to the "Passage 300 Club", as I also bailed around page 300 when the sudden shift to the future occurred.

                               

                              While the sudden break in the story thread and the loss of all the characters I was invested in started the process of de-involvement, it wasn't that alone.  The deal breaker was the idea that this band of primitives was holding off a band or bands of the monsters (why they are referred to as "vampires" I don't know, they don't fit any definition of vampire I've encountered before).  There was some mention of a revered ancestor/founder who had (if I'm recalling correctly) successfully defended some abandoned building with a group of children or other refugees against them.

                               

                              The book's monsters had easily overcome the military defenders of the base they originated in, and then wiped out Western civilzation in what, months?  A year?  Armies and police forces couldn't stop them, but this hardy band of survivors does?  We're told their skin is stronger than Kevlar, they move too fast to be seen, fly (or leap about as if to seem to fly) etc.

                               

                              This is a common error in fantasy and science fiction novels.  The author grants their hero/monster/villian super powers in an attempt to make them awe-inspiring.  But when you give them that much power you can't create any suspense or conflict without having them act later as if they don't have these powers.  Simon Green fell into this with Edwin Drood in his "Secret Histories" series.

                               

                              So that ended it for me.

                               

                              At least Mr. Cronin can put a sentence together, unlike some other recent "blockbuster" authors *cough* Stephanie Myers *cough*, and if he does something outside the realm of this series I'll sure give it a look.


                               

                              See I dont agree with that.  I really enjoyed the middle because it described how the First Colony survived.  

                               

                              "There was some mention of a revered ancestor/founder who had (if I'm recalling correctly) successfully defended some abandoned building with a group of children or other refugees against them."

                               

                              I personally don't remember this part as it has been a few weeks since I read the book and the novel itself took me almost two months to read (it was a very very busy two months LOL).  If your talking about the colony they go onto describe how its a bunch of children who were brought from the last city (Philadelphia and probably some other cities) on a train to california to found the first colony.  They were able to survive because there was never darkness ie.  the sun during the day and the "lights" at night.  I think it is very possible that they could survive and would be able to take down some of the virals.  I dont think the military would stand a chance as they were out to destroy the virals while the colony was just trying to survive.  Also how can the military set up a good base with good protection if they are always on the move trying to wipe out the virals.

                               

                              As to "they don't fit any definition of vampire I've encountered before"  I like these vampires as to me they are almost half vampire / half zombie kind of creatures.  In my mind I pictured them like the zombies from 28 days later.  Super fast, super strong, but dumb as lead.  I have gotten really sick with how vampires are portrayed in todays media (what happened to good old dracula) and it was refreshing to me to have some that were not only different but had a different back story.

                               

                              In conclusion:  I really liked the middle as I felt I was given a well detailed view into the lives of the first colony.  Cronin did a wonderful job telling their side of the story and it really intrigued me.  I will most definitely read the rest of the trilogy and before the second book comes out I will probably power read the first book as I feel that I didn't get enough out of it because I read it so slowly.

                               

                              Anyway to each their own!  I can see how the middle gets slow but I loved it none the less!!

                              • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?
                                BrandieC

                                @Htom_Serveaux:

                                 

                                Justin Cronin has written other things.  I loved his novel Mary and O'Neil; in fact, my enjoyment of his writing in that book was what led me to read The Passage (the hyped press of which had not interested me).

                                  • Re: Has anyone read "The Passage"?
                                    Htom_Serveaux

                                     


                                    BrandieC wrote:

                                    @Htom_Serveaux:

                                     

                                    Justin Cronin has written other things.  I loved his novel Mary and O'Neil; in fact, my enjoyment of his writing in that book was what led me to read The Passage (the hyped press of which had not interested me).


                                     

                                    @BrandieC:

                                     

                                    Thanks, I'll give that (and "The Summer Guest") a look.