16 Replies Latest reply on Nov 25, 2011 6:24 AM by gobasso

    No new Penguin e-books for library lending, and none for Kindle library lending at all

    geertm

      No new Penguin e-books for library lending, and none for Kindle library lending at all.

       

      http://www.thedigitalshift.com/2011/11/ebooks/penguin-group-usa-to-no-longer-allow-library-lending-of-new-ebook-titles/

       

      Perhaps too many people are using the library because of those very high Penguin agency prices.

        • Re: No new Penguin e-books for library lending, and none for Kindle library lending at all
          Doug_Pardee

          Wow, it's getting nasty. I think it's about time for me to write to my politicos.

           

          Particularly interesting is how Amazon is getting slammed harder than the Adobe EPUB world. That's bound to make AMZN very annoyed. We'll see how it plays out.

          • Re: No new Penguin e-books for library lending, and none for Kindle library lending at all

            I don't understand why the publishers feel threatened by lending e-books through the library. Public libraries have been lending for decades and it doesn't seem to have hurt publishers. Anybody have some incite into the publishers reasoning for not allowing libraries to lend?

              • Re: No new Penguin e-books for library lending, and none for Kindle library lending at all

                gobasso wrote:

                I don't understand why the publishers feel threatened by lending e-books through the library. Public libraries have been lending for decades and it doesn't seem to have hurt publishers. Anybody have some incite into the publishers reasoning for not allowing libraries to lend?


                Sorry, I obviously meant insight. Although, in this case incite might express my feelings more accurately.

                  • Re: No new Penguin e-books for library lending, and none for Kindle library lending at all

                    gobasso wrote:

                    gobasso wrote:

                    I don't understand why the publishers feel threatened by lending e-books through the library. Public libraries have been lending for decades and it doesn't seem to have hurt publishers. Anybody have some incite into the publishers reasoning for not allowing libraries to lend?


                    Sorry, I obviously meant insight. Although, in this case incite might express my feelings more accurately.


                    The reason they do this is because they really are not quick to adapt to things and they are looking for ways to make the most out of each individual ebook.  They can't see that ebooks have the potential for way more sales than DTBs and look for shortterm, rather than longterm gains. For the record, this is going on all over with stockholders having a much bigger say in things than customers.

                     

                    They don't yet understand the ebook market and especially potential customers.  They are enacting things they wish were possible in the hard copy world.  This is exemplified in their vision of how retailers should be able to sell ebooks (set price, no variance) and the lack of flexibility that true ownership of a book entails.  They have always hated that if I buy a dead tree book I can give it away or sell it when done with it, because I own it.  They have no control over it once I buy it.  With ebooks they view a book as being licensed to you, not owned by you.

                     

                    Now, with libraries, they think in a real short-sighted way that they are just losing money all over the place.  They try things like licensing ebooks for only 1 year of lending, whereas a hard copy book if taken care of could be lent for an indefinite period of time.

                     

                    Again, they do not understand that in promoting libraries and library reading and lending, they are creating customers.  Not everyone will buy books, but most will.  And the adults that come in to borrow books, often bring in their kids and those kids become readers and book buyers, too.  Libraries sometimes set up book reading clubs not just for adults but kids.  And even booksellers do what libraries do-booksellers have always had seats near bookshelves and let customers browse and even read all day long.  Because booksellers know they are creating good will and promoting reading, which leads to buying.

                     

                     

                    In their defense, I also think they are still in a growing period with all of this.  There are so many older books people want to see as ebooks and "develpment" costs can be high, so they are under pressure to be making the same profits in a down economy while creating ebooks from current and past content.

                     

                    They are also having to pay unexpected costs for things such as illustrations within ebooks that have different licensing concerns than printed illustrations.  So, money is a real part of the equation.  Again, it's shortterm rather than longterm thinking.

                     

                  • Publishers and libraries
                    Doug_Pardee

                    gobasso wrote:

                     

                    I don't understand why the publishers feel threatened by lending e-books through the library. Public libraries have been lending for decades and it doesn't seem to have hurt publishers.


                    They generally believe that library lending has hurt them, but (at least in the US) the law says that they can't control what people do with a book after it's been sold. There is no such law for e-books, and the big publishers are taking advantage of that.

                     

                    Some recent Circuit Court rulings have weakened the laws for physical books, and libraries are getting concerned. In particular, the 2nd Circuit Court — with jurisdiction in New York, Connecticut, and Vermont — has ruled that a book's not covered by that law (generally known as Right of First Sale) if it was printed outside of the US, so the publisher can dictate what the buyer is permitted to do with the book, including prohibiting the buyer from lending or reselling it. See here for details.

                     

                  • Re: No new Penguin e-books for library lending, and none for Kindle library lending at all

                    That's just sad. My library system is a huge supporter of ebooks. They have held several classes in the last few months teaching people to use their ereaders of all types. As a matter of fact they just received a huge grant to purchase 130 e-readers. I think the newsletter mentioned they will be getting Nooks, Sonys, and Kindles. My library is a countywide system with about 18 libraries, but still this was huge since it isn't big city system. Nothing like Philly, but they've been adding titles very quickly.

                     

                     

                    • Re: No new Penguin e-books for library lending, and none for Kindle library lending at all

                      Thanks Doug and deemure. I think it's a shame in general when companies are forced to think only in the short run because of stock holder expectations. I think it will prove disastorous for publishing companies and therefore disastorous to their stock holders. I didn't follow the link but the thought of inhibiting the exchange of ideas by limiting the lending of books is a threat to democracy! Yikes!