11 Replies Latest reply on May 10, 2012 11:08 AM by bobstro

    Managing through Calibre

    msmoonlite

      I just read a few posts where people mention managing their NST library through Calibre. I just recently installed this program to convert certain books so that I can put them on my NST. But I'm wondering if it is worth it to put my entire library in Calibre and manage things through it. Before I had some books stored in ADE, and the BN content I downloaded I just kept on my nook. As my library has grown, I'm becoming increasingly concerned about keeping things organized.

       

      What do you use Claibre for? Do you think is a better storage platform than ADE?

        • Re: Managing through Calibre
          avid-reader-nc

          I'll tell you why I use Calibre and how it works for me.  If that info helps you decide, great.

           

          I had everything in Calibre because i was using a different e-reader and e-reader apps before getting the NST.  Other than for what I now believe was my user error, loading my books onto the NST was a snap!

          Calibre recognized the NST and all I had to do was select the books, convert them, and point to the Calibre icon for delivering them to the NST.

           

          I will continue to use Calibre because 1st, I know technology won't stand still and maybe someday I will buy a different (non B&N) e-reader.  I expect Calibre will do the same great job again.  2nd, with the way Calibre sets up it's library on my PC I can back it up just as a normal part of my PC back-up routine.

           

          I am not familiar with ADE so I hope this info helps.

            • Re: Managing through Calibre
              roustabout

              One thing for all Calibre users to be aware of as they look at e-reading devices:  if, a year from now, there's a comely young e-reader thang showing you the outlines of her knickers and inviting you to take the plunge, be sure that she's not running Honeycomb or Ice Cream Sandwich under her sheets.

               

              As of now, the Honeycomb and ICS devices pretty much suck as  far as being supported by Calibre - they don't let you mount the device as a disk drive, but require you to communicate with it almost as if you were talking to it over a modem.  This is a decision that Google has made on the back-end.  

               

              The workaround is to unmount your removable disk, put it in your computer, and sync to the disk with Calibre.  And that does work, but for me it's a poor way to manage stuff - it's why I've stuck with the Nook platform rather than grabbing a Samsung for my color 7 inch device, for instance.   

                • Re: Managing through Calibre
                  DeanGibson

                  roustabout wrote:

                  ...

                   

                  As of now, the Honeycomb and ICS devices pretty much suck as  far as being supported by Calibre - they don't let you mount the device as a disk drive, but require you to communicate with it almost as if you were talking to it over a modem.  


                  Does rooting, running Samba on the device, and mapping the network connection to a local PC drive, solve this problem?

                    • Calibre + cloud is a winner
                      bobstro

                      DeanGibson wrote:

                      Does rooting, running Samba on the device, and mapping the network connection to a local PC drive, solve this problem?


                      I have used Calibre to bulk export my "to read" reading list to a directory structure that I sync up to my device using Dropbox on the Calibre server and Dropsync on my Android devices. This works on my NC, NT and NST, as well as the new Samsung. The target directory varies by device, but in all cases, I sync books to the NOOK folder (either /sdcard/My Files/Books for native NOOK devices, or /sdcard/Nook/MyDocuments/Books for Android devices running the NOOK app.) By using the NOOK directory, the magazines downloaded through the NOOK app are also automatically "in" my collection. I also have a cron job that pulls various newspaper and magazine news feeds from Calibre and populates and maintains a Dropbox folder for subscriptions. I haven't tried Calibre's rsync features yet.

                       

                      I could, of course, skip Dropbox, and just use rsync to my own server, but Dropsync is convenient when I'm on the road.

                       

                      Using Dropsync or rsync optimizes downloads and uploads, so only deltas are synchronized on each pass. I can use Calibre Library on any one of my devices to download a book into the appropriate directory, and it gets synced up with the other devices.

                       

                      I can confirm that Calibre does not detect the Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 running ICS, but I haven't used a direct USB connection much as I'm usually in a different state than my Calibre server.

                       

                      In recent days, I've begun experimenting with Mantano's cloud library service ($20 yearly for 4 devices, 5 GB, 2,000 books) and I'm quite pleased. In addition to having my books synchronized, it synchronizes reading positions. The Mantano home page is a pretty decent replacement for the B&N Library, with superior organization capabilities, and with the cloud service, everything is backed up. I like it so much that I've set Mantano Reader as my Library button on the NST. It's essentially a "Mantano Simple Touch" now.

                       

                      I haven't tried FBreader in recent month, but I believe it can do many of these things as well.

                       

                      So to tie this all together: I can still use Calibre for the essential library management functions, and maintaining reading lists. Its functionality is greatly enhanced through the use of networked/cloud services that allow access to files regardless of geographic location (assuming network availability).

                    • Re: Managing through Calibre

                      roustabout wrote:

                      As of now, the Honeycomb and ICS devices pretty much suck as  far as being supported by Calibre - they don't let you mount the device as a disk drive, but require you to communicate with it almost as if you were talking to it over a modem.  This is a decision that Google has made on the back-end.  



                      True, if you want to use a USB cable. But any tablet having a web browser can play very nicely with Calibre wirelessly by connecting to the Calibre Content Server. It works just fine. There's also a relatively new Android app -- Calibre Library (which I haven't tried) - that apparently does the same without a browser. And several reader apps (Aldiko, for one) have native ability to connect directly to the Calibre Content Server.

                       

                      To me, these are nicer alternatives than plugging in a USB cable anyway. I'm not tethered to my PC, I can browse my Calibre library to my heart's content, and I can choose books to transfer to my tablet.

                       

                        • Re: Managing through Calibre
                          wordsandmelodies

                          Calibre is a much richer program than ADE.  It is updated weekly. Perhaps because of how many ebooks I have on my NOOK, ADE was R-E-A-L-L-Y slow for me on startup, and Calibre is much faster.  I can organize and sort my books in a bunch of different ways, including using tags.  I can edit coverart and metadata.  I can tweak the EPUB and fix typos in my ebooks, which otherwise drove me NUTS.  Should you, after making a well-considered decision, decide to strip the DRM from your ebooks, there are plugins that will do so for you in Calibre, too.  

                           

                          Upon reflection, one of the things that I like about Calibre is that you can start out with the most basic functionality, and work up to doing some pretty complex things -- and the program makes them pretty straightforward.

                            • Re: Managing through Calibre

                              wordsandmelodies wrote:

                              Calibre is a much richer program than ADE.  It is updated weekly. Perhaps because of how many ebooks I have on my NOOK, ADE was R-E-A-L-L-Y slow for me on startup, and Calibre is much faster.  I can organize and sort my books in a bunch of different ways, including using tags.  I can edit coverart and metadata.  I can tweak the EPUB and fix typos in my ebooks, which otherwise drove me NUTS.  Should you, after making a well-considered decision, decide to strip the DRM from your ebooks, there are plugins that will do so for you in Calibre, too.  

                               

                              Upon reflection, one of the things that I like about Calibre is that you can start out with the most basic functionality, and work up to doing some pretty complex things -- and the program makes them pretty straightforward.


                              Hi wordsandmelodies,

                               

                              You summed it up very well: "you can start out with the most basic functionality, and work up to doing some pretty complex things".

                               

                              I want to emphasize a couple of things. Calibre does NOT need a rooted Nook and Calibre is freeware.

                               

                              It's one of the most useful programs that I use on a regular basis.

                                • Re: Managing through Calibre
                                  bobstro

                                  Marty-TX wrote:

                                  [...] I want to emphasize a couple of things. Calibre does NOT need a rooted Nook and Calibre is freeware.

                                   

                                  It's one of the most useful programs that I use on a regular basis.


                                  An excellent point! Calibre is well worth checking out, even for those only interersted in "the basics". I continue to be impressed with its capabilities. 

                              • Re: Managing through Calibre
                                roustabout

                                "But any tablet having a web browser can play very nicely with Calibre wirelessly by connecting to the Calibre Content Server. It works just fine." 

                                 

                                The last time I used it, it worked pretty badly for what I wanted to do.  I use the USB cable to do bulk management of titles, and moving groups of titles in and out via the web interface was very slow because I wasn't easily able to drag-select the groups of titles I wanted to work with. 

                                 

                                Also, the web interface doesn't know what you already have on your device, where bidirectional polling via the USB works very well. 

                                 

                                The SMB share idea is one I looked at briefly and haven't gone back to yet.  I think there was an issue with mounting sdcards and /media directories over SMB when I looked at it last - the SMB server for Android didn't support fat filesystems. 

                                  • Re: Managing through Calibre
                                    DeanGibson

                                    roustabout wrote:....  I think there was an issue with mounting sdcards and /media directories over SMB when I looked at it last - the SMB server for Android didn't support fat filesystems.

                                    It's the other way around:  Android Samba won't share non-vfat partitions.  I just tried it, mapping a subdirectory on /mnt/sdscard to PC drive Z:

                                     

                                    The current version will share /mnt/sdcard and one other vfat partition.

                                     

                            • Re: Managing through Calibre

                              The thing I like about Calibre is that I can rate the books I've read so I know which books I've read and which authors I liked.