9 Replies Latest reply on May 26, 2012 1:13 PM by roustabout

    Rooting my NookColor

      My husband just "jail-broke" his iphone and he loves all the new things that he can do to it. I am not that interested in my iphone but I do LOVE my nookcolor so I decided to check into doing something like that for it. But I have been bombarded with information. There are so many different options: rooting, autonooter, CM7, N2A. I just don't know which is the right option for me. Can anybody help me with this? Maybe some pros and cons to each option?

        • Re: Rooting my NookColor
          DeanGibson

          For someone new to the idea, I'd think the N2A card (which is separately bootable and leaves the internal memory of the Nook intact) would be the best approach.

          • Re: Rooting my NookColor
            bobstro
            What sort of things is your husband doing on his iPhone that you'd like to do on your NOOK? Each approach haspros and cons. Rooting preserves the B&N ecosystem (e.g. Read in store) but does modify the base system in a reversible way. Booting and N2A or functionally equivalent AFN card boot onto abtotally separate system called CyanogenMod, which gives you a more generic Android experience at the expense of some of rose B&N features while in the alternate OS.
            • Re: Rooting my NookColor
              BruceMcF

              boot-from-SD (most often CM7, sometimes from a vender, sometimes a home-made card):

              pro's: fully reversible. Just swap out the card with a non-booting card, and its a stock Nook Color again

              con's: have to reboot to swap between the stock Nook system and the apps on the open system, which is more time consuming than just having them there.

               

              washup: a good, safe, first trial to experience what having an alternative system running on the Nook Color is like. For some people, the result of their experience is that's what they want.

               

              root stock system (eg manual nooter):

              pro's: you have the stock system, big sized, squint free icons, one touch to get back to your book, and all, just with apps on the home screen that are not available on the Nook appstore.

              con's: there's a bit of hassle keeping it rooted when a new update comes out ~ its possible to get sorted out, but its another thing to get sorted out ~ and if you want to bring the NC in for warranty work, you may have to revert it to unrooted stock, which can be another hassle.

               

              washup: if you've tried the SD boot, you'll know whether you would rather have the SD boot all the time, or rather have a way to migrate your SD boot apps to your stock system. If you find yourself in the second camp, rooting the stock system is the way to go.

               

              install alternate kernel (eg, CM7):

              pro's: its not the stock system, so it doesn't have the stock limitation. So it can support overclocking, USB keyboards, and all sorts of wonderful tweeks and tricks that the modding community have developed.

              con's: its not the stock system, so if you prefer the stock system, it'll annoy you not having it. Paradoxically, it can be less hassle reverting it than the rooted stock system, if you install Clockwork on the system itself.

               

              washup: if you've tried the SD boot, you'll know whether you would rather have the SD boot all the time, or rather have a way to migrate your SD boot apps to your stock system. If you find yourself in the first camp, its time to consider leaving the B&N Nook version of Android behind for an open project version of Android.

               

              I'm mostly in group 2, but enough in group 1 that I have a CM7 boot SD too, but its a matter of working out which best fits your preferences.

              • Re: Rooting my NookColor

                I like and use Manualnooter also. I have CM7 on a card but rarely have the card in and rarely use it.

                  • Re: Rooting my NookColor
                    roustabout

                    Vote for manual nooter or similar here.  

                     

                    My NC, NT, NST and glowworm are all internally rooted with manual nooter and its brethren - copying a few files to /system to give me root access but leaving the rest of stock alone.  The most complicated process was on the nook tablet, but dean gibson wrote a really nice description of how to do that.

                     

                    I have a writeup for the basic steps for the NC (now somewhat out of date;  I prefer OS 1.2 to any of the later OSes, and so since then I've focused more on how to avoid being updated than on how to root the udpates.)

                     

                    http://nookworks.blogspot.com/2011/05/i-want-to-root-my-nc.html

                     

                     

                    The basic steps for more recent OSes are the same, but you'll need to locate a manual nooter that you're sure will work with your OS release.   

                      • Re: Rooting my NookColor
                        BruceMcF

                        roustabout wrote:

                        ...

                        The basic steps for more recent OSes are the same, but you'll need to locate a manual nooter that you're sure will work with your OS release.   


                         

                        For 4.1 / 4.2, this is the forum thread at xda.

                          • Re: Rooting my NookColor

                            what does "do a complete wipe" mean? It doesn't explain that anywhere.

                              • Re: Rooting my NookColor

                                A complete wipe is basically a factory reset of your NC with the additional step of deregistering and reregistering your device.  Here's a guide from Nookdevs:

                                 

                                http://nookdevs.com/Flash_back_to_clean_stock_ROM

                                 

                                • Re: Rooting my NookColor
                                  roustabout

                                  A complete wipe or restore to stock means you wipe /system and /data, the two chunks of an NC that are modified when you install apps and/or root your device, and you restore /boot to its original state.  A rooted NC can wind up with an unintentionally modified /boot partition.

                                   

                                  There are a number of ways to do this;  I find using a one-step wipe and reimage process easiest and most consistently successful, because it will restore /boot.  I describe how to do it here:

                                   

                                  http://nookworks.blogspot.com/2011/05/clean-12-install.html

                                   

                                  That leaves you at 1.2.  There is also a flashable 1.3 around, and probably a 1.4.2 also, but the clean 1.2 you make using that post can be updated to 1.4.2 by downloading the update, copying it to your NC and letting the nook update itself. 

                                   

                                  Combining the erase and deregister command with 8 failed boots does approximately the same thing in two steps - one erases /system, one erases /data.  (probably erase + dereg erases /data, because the registration token from BN lives in /data/system, if I remember it right.)  

                                   

                                  I think some folks have found that 8 failed boots does not always work to completely fix things - if /boot was altered to start with, 8 failed boots may not be able to trigger a recovery process?