1 2 3 First Previous 41 Replies Latest reply on Apr 6, 2010 11:49 AM by jaydeyez

    Book Prices AGAIN!

      Yesterday I was reviewing my wishlist and saw "Me, The Mob and The Music went from $9.99 to $18.57, that is an increase or 186% and the Kendel price is $9.99. Thanks B&N for being loyal to you Nook customer base. Can we expect the same treatment in the future?

        • 1. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

          • 2. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

            Pricing is very confusing to a lot of people within the book industry.  Amazon's untraditional method of pricing at the retailer level came under fire by MacMillan last month and a lot of publishers are following their lead.  Books are typically priced by the publisher and not the retailer.  When it comes to ebooks, there just hasn't been enough information available to determine a price range and publishers are watching that closely right now.  With all of he ereaders out on the market now and consumer activity, I think you will see the volatility in pricing begin to even out over the next year as more data and feedback is available.

             

             

            • 3. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

              $12 - $15 for an e-book?

               

              That's Nuttin!

               

              Check out thi little gem that B&N offers!

              http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Frege-and-Other-Philosophers/Michael-Dummett/e/9780191520051/?itm=80

              • 4. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

                The major price increases are to be blamed on the publishers.  Early on, B&N followed Amazon's pricing model by and large, the $9.99 price point that's been frequently mentioned in this thread already.  Then in stepped the publishing industry once they saw all the readers taking off and the retailers having more control over the pricing then they do and they are not used to this business model.  They saw an expanding market and wanted a bigger slice of pie.

                 

                Add to this recent deals that all major publishers, with the exception of one hold out, have signed deals with Apple computers to publish on Apple's Ibookstore.  As you can imagine there are all sorts of exclusive pricing guarantees the publishers must extend to Apple ahead of any other retailer.  This give Apple the advantage of having a large chunk of eBooks at the best prices and most availability.

                 

                The simplest way to deal with the outrageous price increases is very simple:

                 

                VOTE WITH YOUR WALLET!

                 

                Do NOT buy an eBook at $18.99 or $12.99 or whatever price point you feel is unfair.  No eBook should cost any more or equally to the current tangible format available.  Bottom line is if an eBook is not selling at all at $19  then the publishing giants will have to concede to more reasonable pricing points that early eBook users have come accustomed to.

                 

                • 5. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

                  "Do NOT buy an eBook at $18.99 or $12.99 or whatever price point you feel is unfair.  No eBook should cost any more or equally to the current tangible format available.  Bottom line is if an eBook is not selling at all at $19  then the publishing giants will have to concede to more reasonable pricing points that early eBook users have come accustomed to."

                   

                  This

                   

                   

                  • 6. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

                    Actually, the biggest reason so many of the big publishers are willing to sign on with Apple is because Apple is telling them that it's perfectly fine for them to charge as much as they want, unlike Amazon, which holds them to the $9.99 model. In return, though, the publishers have to sign an agreement that they won't allow their ebooks to be sold for any less anywhere else - and that's BAD news for all of us, because there will be no "deals" anywhere except when the publishers decide to bring down the price everywhere. And if the books all cost the same pretty much anywhere, then people will be making their buying decisions based on other things besides price, like which drm is gonna be the most compatible with the most devices - and that's probably why you see B&N signing deals witht the likes of Samsung, supporting various E-Readers.

                    • 7. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

                      Frege and Other Philosophers = LoL, that IS good for a laugh. :smileyhappy:

                      • 8. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

                         

                        imno007 wrote:

                        Actually, the biggest reason so many of the big publishers are willing to sign on with Apple is because Apple is telling them that it's perfectly fine for them to charge as much as they want, unlike Amazon, which holds them to the $9.99 model.

                         

                         

                        However, Apple's model is turning some heads.  They're allowing publishers to set the price, however, they take 30%.  This is different than what publisher's are used to:  which is retailers paying up front a discounted price and marking the books up.

                         

                        Random House has refused to sign up so far.

                        • 9. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

                           

                          ratdog wrote:

                          $12 - $15 for an e-book?

                           

                          That's Nuttin!

                           

                          Check out thi little gem that B&N offers!

                          http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Frege-and-Other-Philosophers/Michael-Dummett/e/9780191520051/?itm=80

                           

                          Thanks for the link!  I ordered two, I wanted a back up in case I lost one.  :smileywink:

                           

                          • 10. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

                            I can't help but wonder if some of these pricing issues on B&N aren't typos.

                            • 11. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!
                              imno007 wrote:

                              Actually, the biggest reason so many of the big publishers are willing to sign on with Apple is because Apple is telling them that it's perfectly fine for them to charge as much as they want, unlike Amazon, which holds them to the $9.99 model.

                              Ummm ...I think this is backwards.  Retailers don't tell manufacturers (in this case, publishers) how much they can charge for their product.

                               

                              For example, Amazon pays $12 for many of the NYT best-sellers they offer.  They choose to charge $9.99.  They lose money on those sales.  They don't tell the publisher, we're only charging $9.99 so you can only charge us $8 in stead of $12.

                              • 12. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

                                Well, what the publishers are actually crying about is that Amazon is"devaluing" their titles in the eyes of the public by selling them for $9.99. Which is entirely correct, of course, in my opinion, because I know that when I walk out of a bookstore with a $8.50 paperback that had to be printed, warehoused, transported and shelved, that I can loan out or give away as I see fit, I always feel guilty, almost like I've stolen it, because it's so unbelievably inexpensive.

                                • 13. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

                                   

                                  imno007 wrote:

                                  Well, what the publishers are actually crying about is that Amazon is"devaluing" their titles in the eyes of the public by selling them for $9.99.

                                  I understand that this is the complaint.  But if you look at the current NYT bestsellers, and the prices they sell for, it starts to unravel in my opinion.

                                   

                                  The current NYT bestseller in the category of hardcover fiction is Jodi Picoult's "House Rules."  It has a MSRP of $28.00.  You can buy it on Amazon for $13.99 - which is half off.  Doesn't that sale price "devalue" the hardcover as much as a $9.99 eBook?  That particular title is not available as an eBook at any price because of the publisher's anti-eBook policy (which Jodi Picoult herself disagrees with).

                                   

                                  Number two on the hardcover fiction list - "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett.  MSRP is $24.95, and you can buy the eBook for $9.99 at B&N and Amazon.  It is available to borrow for free from my local eLibrary.  Is it devalued?  Hmmmmm....let me think.  IT'S NUMBER TWO ON THE NYT BESTSELLER LIST!  It doesn't appear that the availability of a rationally priced eBook has hurt its sales in any way.

                                   

                                  Please, John Sargent - come on this board and let's debate this issue.

                                   

                                   

                                  • 14. Re: Book Prices AGAIN!

                                    Here's a 10-minute video of Sargent getting owned by an agent and another publisher.  Notice how out of step he is on the new technology and the challeges ahead.  This is not the guy I'd want leading my company:

                                     

                                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2b46fHUE7c

                                     

                                     

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