19 Replies Latest reply on Jan 18, 2013 1:53 PM by BruceMcF

    What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be

      It's interesting to me to see the expectations some users have of the NOOK.

       

      Please Note: This is just an observation. Not making judgement, just stating a thought. And interested in your thoughts.

       

      *****

       

      Here's how some users envision the NOOK -

       

       

      A) It has Google Play Store. And just as many apps and all free and all phone apps work great on the Tablet.

      Most software and games you would possibly want is free.

       

      B) It has Apple smoothness in the Operating System. Everything just works.

       

      C) It has the core NOOK benefits i.e. Great quality hardware, great screen, low prices.

       

      D) It lets you get books from anywhere - Amazon, B&N, Google.

       

      E) It has core NOOK Strengths - Books for Kids, Apps for Kids

       

      F) It has all the features that Google and Amazon Tablets have i.e. Google Apps (Google), Easy Store Search (Amazon), etc.

       

      G) It has the low NOOK prices ($199, $269).

       

      *****

       

      Why is this?

      Why is there an automatic assumption that NOOK will have not only Nook strengths but also Apple strengths (ease of use, smoothness, lots of apps) and Google strengths (lots of free apps, Google in-built apps) and Amazon strengths (easy to search store, cloud services work great).

       

      Is B&N setting the wrong expectations?

       

      Are people just assuming it's an Android Tablet?

       

      Are expectations unrealistic? That there will be zero trade-offs?

       

      Is the bar very high due to IPad and iPad Mini and people now want all of that, except at a much lower price?

       

      *****

       

      It almost seems to me like people are creating a fantasy device and then getting disappointed because reality isn't meeting that fantasy.

       

      If you break it into all the problems users have, there are obviously some things that B&N should fix i.e. all the bugs. Perhaps even switching to another app store.

       

      However, there also seem to be lots of issues that seem impossible to fix, ever.

       

      Are people just wanting an iPad Mini for $199 with a Nook label on it?

      Or Perhaps a Google Nexus 7" with a better screen and Apple type usability?

       

      something else?

       

      *****

      Fundamentally, here's my main question:

       

      Are people coming into this without realizing that they can't get a $499 iPad type experience for $269? Are they perhaps just assuming this is an Android Tablet and thus like every other Google Play run Android Tablet?

        • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
          kamas716

          5ivedom wrote:

          I

          Fundamentally, here's my main question:

           

          Are people coming into this without realizing that they can't get a $499 iPad type experience for $269? Are they perhaps just assuming this is an Android Tablet and thus like every other Google Play run Android Tablet?


          IMO, that's it, right there.  People simply have unreal expectations.  They think that because this or that device works with something, all their devices should work just the same. 

           

          B&N isn't alone in this.  I used to see it when I worked retail after college.  I see it every day in law enforcement.  My wife sees it all the time in education.

          • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
            TnTexas

            Because of the iPad and regular Android tablets, many bring certain expectations to the table when they hear the word "tablet". Many of those expectations are unrealistic where the Nook line is concerned. The software just isn't designed to accommodate them - not out of the box, anyway.

              • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be

                I don't (didn't?) have really different expectations for my nook (the tablet or the hd).  Here's what I wanted:  a reader that I didn't need a night light for, I could play some games on, and I could watch movies/hulu on.  I got all that with both devices.  I had the N2A card for my tablet, and I really didn't use it that often as I wasn't an android junky at the time.  Now, I have a galaxy s3 phone - so that fulfills any android cravings I need and my Nook Hd is exactly what I want - a Nook :smileyhappy:

                 

                (You know the hardware isn't really what I want fixed anyway, its the owner of the hardware!)

              • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
                compulsivereaderTX

                I've owned Nooks since the first NE1, then the NST and the NC. I didn't feel the NT was enough of a step up to spend the money on so soon after my NC purchase. I would not have purchased the HD+ because I was really pretty happy with my rooted NC but I was fully aware that my NC was nearing the end of it's warranty and had already been replaced once. (The NC is now my dedicated device for my craft room, as close to tablet use as I will get with one of these devices)

                 

                My Expectations: If I could get a Nook device with a faster processor, larger screen and more room for books on it for less than I paid for my NC...THAT is what I was expecting. I was expecting the same quality of software plus the same app store, etc with some enhancements maybe.

                 

                However.....I was expecting features one would expect from a book store as in library management, etc. After this amount of time, I was expecting them to get that part of it right or at least to see some major improvements in that area as BN has a few years now to figure out what we want in an ereader. didn't happen, they took a few steps backwards...a lot of steps backwards.)

                 

                I wasn't expecting google play or any of that, but had hopes that the xda folks would have a root available soon (which they did! YEAH!) for apps I felt were important to an EREADER and my own personal needs as an avid reader, but knew BN would never develop. As a tablet? Eh...I still don't use it much as a tablet, haven't watched any movies on it yet, just the previews. I have played a few games on it, but mostly, I read on it and spend a lot of time trying to get it to the point that I am as happy with it as I am with my rooted NC. If I could have the specs of the HD+ on my NC, I would have been one happy camper. 

                 

                 

                 

                 

                • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
                  bobstro

                  5ivedom wrote:

                  [...] Are people coming into this without realizing that they can't get a $499 iPad type experience for $269? Are they perhaps just assuming this is an Android Tablet and thus like every other Google Play run Android Tablet?

                   

                   

                  You're clearly obsessed with Google Play. Speaking for myself, I find it frustrating that the device is prevented from being used how I want to use it for purely artificial reasons. Two prime examples:

                   

                  1. 3rd party apps. I needed a few additional apps that B&N doesn't sell to use my device (NC) as my sole reader/tablet for a typical workday. I was told by B&N that this wasn't possible. Yet by rooting my device, I've been able to run that software with no problems, other than those imposed by B&N during updates. My disappointment here stems from both B&N insisting on controlling how I use my device by actively disabling my ability to run 3rd party software in software "updates", and their as-yet unfulfilled promise of a rich app store after two years. Posts like yours promising app store Nirvarna if only we'll stick with it another 10 years only aggravate this frustration. The only thing keeping my NOOK from performing like that $499 iPad in many cases is a B&N decision. I don't want all my software for free. I want to run the software I need, and that I've paid for. B&N (and your) insistence that we maintain a state of purity in order to be "good customers" is outrageous.
                  2. Basic bugs and stupid design decisions. The suddenly non-functional page numbering in the NST/NSTG ToC is typical. Something stops working. We get some half-baked explanation from various B&N folk as to why (yo), only to find that the explanation is completely bogus. In this case, allusions were made to "performance". A quick test shows that the NST is more than capable of quickly generating page numbers in multi-level ToCs. Loss of shelving is another long-standing problem that hasn't been fixed for years.

                  Are you implying that a device that "just works" requires the purchase of a more expensive device? Don't you feel that the NOOK should work?

                   

                  At a fundamental level, this has been the result of B&N promising more than has been available in advertising (most notably, the apps store), together with frustrations from knowing the device can do more. It has nothing to do with creating a fantasy device. It's wanting the device to do what it can do, as I need it to. I can understand B&N not supporting such usage, but it's their active determination to block and remove such capabilities that I can't abide.

                   

                  Personally, I've learned my lesson with the NC and NT. I'll never buy another NOOK device, unless they make some radical changes in how customers are treated. I do still own 6 of the devices, so have an active interest in them. I also would like to see B&N succeed, so offer up my own take on what would improve things.

                    • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
                      TnTexas

                      bobstro: It has nothing to do with creating a fantasy device. It's wanting the device to do what it can do, I can understand B&N not supporting such usage, but it's their active determination to block and remove such capabilities that I can't abide.

                       

                      This was what eventually got to me too. I bought a Nook Color back in the summer of 2011 because (as far as I could tell) it was the only one of its kind at the time - an ereader with a tabletesque experience. I liked it a lot - except for the audiobook experience. Never could figure out how to get the player to save my place in my B&N-bought audiobook. It always kept starting back at the very beginning instead of where I left off - very frustrating so I didn't buy any more audiobooks from B&N than that one. A few months later, I heard about the N2A cards and decided to try one out. Now I could use the Audible app for audiobooks and listen to audiobooks on my Color without any problems. Yay! 

                       

                      B&N and I got along smashingly for a few months; and then around Thanksgiving that year, the Nook Tablet was released. Within days the Internet was buzzing about how you could trigger a settings menu and install apps directly onto the device itself - no N2A cards needed. Having the "N2A side" of the device sort of integrated with the Nook side would be neat, I thoguht. Maybe I'll buy one some day. Then I happened to run across one article (just one out of tons of articles on the subject) that said B&N was calling the ability a "bug" and that they would be probably be fixing it sometime soon. Despite the fact that it was only one article, I decided it might be prudent of me to go ahead and get one if I wanted to make use of that "bug". So I did. A month later (Christmas Eve to be exact), the feature was disabled. I wasn't happy about the disabling, but I had expected it. So although my feelings towards B&N started to shift, I had a device I was pretty content with since I'd made sure I'd installed all the apps I absolutely wanted.

                       

                      My feelings towards B&N weren't nearly as warm and fuzzy after that as they had been, but we got along tolerably well for a few months after that. Then they decided to do an update which changed the size of the icons on the homescreen. Not a problem, one might think, but I'd installed an app which allowed me to put icons for my third-party apps directly on my homescreen - just like you can on a regular Android tablet. I'd been enjoying the ability to have icons for everything I used right there in plain view - books I was reading from B&N and any app I was using whether it was from B&N or not . Loved the convenience of the set up. But now - totally unexpectedly -  my non-B&N icons didn't work anymore. Don't know if it was because the size of the apps were changed or if it was something else; but while the apps themselves still worked, you could no longer launch them directly from the homescreen. You now had to search for them and then launche them. My relationship with B&N might have survived the incident if I could have updated the app which allowed me to put the icons on the screen in the first place, but  B&N's earlier "bug".fix made that impossible.

                       

                      That's when I decided B&N was not for me. If they could reach in and change my device so drastically, I knew I was in the wrong place. Sure, the functionality I was suddenly missing was provided by a non-B&N app, but why even change the size of the icons in the first place? What if I preferred the smaller, sleeker icons to the larger, chunkier ones because I could get more icons on a screen? So even if I'd been running just B&N apps, I wouldn't have been happy with the sudden change to the interface. I don't like outside forces changing my device like that.

                    • B&N following in IBM footsteps
                      DeanGibson

                      5ivedom wrote:
                      ...

                      Fundamentally, here's my main question:

                       

                      Are people coming into this without realizing that they can't get a $499 iPad type experience for $269? Are they perhaps just assuming this is an Android Tablet and thus like every other Google Play run Android Tablet?


                      I think there's a difference between a $269 product that isn't capable of doing what a $499 product can do, and one that is capable but crippled, in the minds of the buyer (as usually proven out by xda-devs).

                       

                      Mind you, every Nook I've bought has done what I wanted it to do before I bought it.  That is, the first Nook of each model.  Once I found out what I could get it to do, I sometimes bought a 2nd Nook of that model, with much greater expectations. :smileyvery-happy:

                       

                      While crippling a device can be annoying, this is not a new practice.  In the 1960s and 70s, IBM leased model 360 computers with a great variety of features available on each model.  If you decided to upgrade the features (usually performance, or additional emulation instruction sets) available to you on the computer, the IBM service technician came and just moved a couple wires inside the computer, ran a few tests, and left, in about thirty minutes.  They sometimes even let you watch.  There were even jokes about this, with instructions to IBM technicians who were installing a $1000 feature, not to accidentally move the wrong wire and install a $10,000 feature.

                       

                      Here's a key difference between then and today:  IBM still owned the computer.  Also, this was the commercial computer field, where customer expectations were a bit more controlled.

                        • Re: Unrealistic expectations of Nook
                          AlbionRose

                          The person wanting a $499 tablet for a knock down price is me!

                          I read the B&N press about the HD+ being comparable to the Ipad, and I fell for it. You would think that having experienced the hype of Sea Monkeys I should have known better!

                           

                          Though to be fair, I never expected the sleek performance of an ipad, and knew that the camera and gps were off the table. And I'm not much of a game app queen.

                           

                          What I did expect was that the basic tablet-like functions would work. The photo gallery, the music player, the video player, the email and the browser. And that the data on the SD card would be available fairly seamlessly. And via the B&N OS, this did not happen for me. I battled with duplicating files, disappearing emails and lack of functionality that was readily available to US users. And CS were very nice, but not very well informed about issues or solutions.

                           

                          In desperation, I turned to the N2A download to get my gallery and music player working with my SD card files. And after a fair bit of trial and error, guess what?

                          I now have that $499 tablet! :smileyvery-happy:

                           

                          I'm a bit taken aback by how much my HD+ can do when it's unleashed.  I was going to wait until my dream tablet was available before I splashed out on one, but realised that my wish list was pretty far fetched. So I compromised on what I thought was a cheap & cheerful one with a gorgeous screen. But do you know what? I now know that my Nook can

                          * run a bluetooth keyboard and mouse - thanks to Lancastrian, Miss Kilman & co.

                          * print if I email the document to a wireless printer - thanks to Laurieb52

                          * read and edit microsoft office documents thanks to free and addless Kingsoft office

                          * Maybe expand its memory as far as a whopping 64GB - thanks to Larrym19

                          * Use SD card files seamlessly in Poweramp, MX player and Quickpic - one copy only, yeah!

                          Not to mention how amazing game graphics are - my son is hooked on Beach Buggy Blitz, and my movie dvds converted using DVD catalyst are fabulous to watch.

                          It's scarily close to my dream device.

                          And I still use it in Nook mode for reading, because I really like the reader.

                           

                          All this does make me agree with the others who wonder why B&N don't focus on making the reader experience via the Nooks or Android Apps for other devices so fabulous that people choose to use it and buy their content from B&N, rather than trying to make them. And run standard android os & allow access to regular Android Apps for the other stuff. The money spent on programming - developing and fixing their own OS - must be massive. Surely better to focus that cash on the reader experience?

                          • Re: B&N following in IBM footsteps

                            DeanGibson wrote:

                            5ivedom wrote:
                            ...

                            Fundamentally, here's my main question:

                             

                            Are people coming into this without realizing that they can't get a $499 iPad type experience for $269? Are they perhaps just assuming this is an Android Tablet and thus like every other Google Play run Android Tablet?


                            I think there's a difference between a $269 product that isn't capable of doing what a $499 product can do, and one that is capable but crippled, in the minds of the buyer (as usually proven out by xda-devs).

                             

                            Mind you, every Nook I've bought has done what I wanted it to do before I bought it.  That is, the first Nook of each model.  Once I found out what I could get it to do, I sometimes bought a 2nd Nook of that model, with much greater expectations. :smileyvery-happy:

                             

                            While crippling a device can be annoying, this is not a new practice.  In the 1960s and 70s, IBM leased model 360 computers with a great variety of features available on each model.  If you decided to upgrade the features (usually performance, or additional emulation instruction sets) available to you on the computer, the IBM service technician came and just moved a couple wires inside the computer, ran a few tests, and left, in about thirty minutes.  They sometimes even let you watch.  There were even jokes about this, with instructions to IBM technicians who were installing a $1000 feature, not to accidentally move the wrong wire and install a $10,000 feature.

                             

                            Here's a key difference between then and today:  IBM still owned the computer.  Also, this was the commercial computer field, where customer expectations were a bit more controlled.


                            Yeah, I heard those stories, too.  I also heard that CDC's Field Service Engineering policy was to lock themselves into the data center, put paper over the windows so that nobody outside could see what they were doing, make the upgrade, then eat their bag lunches and read magazines for a couple of hours.  :smileylol:

                          • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be

                            5ivedom wrote:


                            It almost seems to me like people are creating a fantasy device and then getting disappointed because reality isn't meeting that fantasy.

                             


                            Delete the word device and you have a succinct description of the prevalent human condition. Why should Nook customers be any different?

                            • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
                              TnTexas

                              Speaking of the Nook Video Store, can it only be accessed via one of the HD tablets? I ask because with my PC, I could only locate 1 page for it, and that page only has 35 videos listed. Surely there's more to the store than that.

                                • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
                                  Mercury_Glitch

                                  Dean, I'll take that bet.  Though I'd be disqualified for insider information.  B&N has contests over the year for the stores, the prize(s) have generally been Nooks of one type or another (usually NTs) for every employee in good standing (working). 

                                   

                                  Even if that doesn't settle it, they also gave out tablets to many people in corporate.  And to some store managers.

                                   

                                  Are these the people they should have been giving the devices to?  Well in the first example sure, rewarding brick and mortar staff for a job well done builds store morale, and doing with the NT means you have a staff who owns the product you're trying to sell.  Kind of good for in store support.

                                   

                                  As to the corporate folks and store managers (who did nothing to 'earn' the device save be a store manager at a given time, at least to my knowledge).  Nope.  Most of those devices would have been better used in the hands of developers.

                                   

                                   

                                  I also back the suggestion (I've lost count if it's thirded or fourthed at this point) of getting the XDA devs who want to mess with the Nook on board, as well as the Calibre developer.  I think there would be a great improvement in even the eink devices if this was to happen.  Which means it probably wont. 

                                   

                                   

                                    • Management saw the Nook Color and executed pretty well on what they learned
                                      roustabout

                                      Unfortunately, the management in question was not at Barnes and Noble. 

                                       

                                      2 years ago, Barnes and Noble prototyped the mass market 7 inch tablet.  Samsung was also in the space, but at an absurd price point. 

                                       

                                      At Google, Amazon and Apple everyone watched as sales went very, very well.  They undoubtedly also saw the number of users who bought the hardware and cheerfuly modified it. 

                                       

                                      The lesson they took from it?  The app ecosystem had to come first.  This apparently hadn't occurred to BN, scared them as they realized it - and I still don't think they've truly overcome their initial response. Barnes and Noble actively discouraged development on their platform and for their shop for the first year or more of the LCD devices' life.  

                                       

                                      "ooh, we have a remarkably precocious child who's doing well in school" - most parents would encourage this child;  BN bound theirs to a radiator. 

                                       

                                      Long before Amazon launched its own tablet, they started building out an app store.  IIRC, their app store launched with ~14,000 apps.  They knew that the device they'd sell had to be ready for individual customers rather than an army of Julies stopping into the Stepford retail outlet. 

                                       

                                      Much before Apple released the iPad Mini - and even before they launched the iPad, or launched the iPhone - they had experience building walled gardens.  First, they had an OS in which there very few vendors working, the MacOS.  Lots of shareware, but how many core, non-Apple applications?  An accidental wall.   Then they had the iPod which only needed to play music.  But let them learn how to deliver content to devices, how to enforce use of their software to manage the content and how to get consumer to accept that - by maintaining a loopy DRM scheme with the assistance of the litigious knuckleheads at RIAA who basically scared a lot of people away from letting their kids have devices that could easily use open formats.  When the iPhone launched, Apple wanted and delivered a way to get development done on it.  And when the iPad launched, there were a lot of apps available at day one, since you could run phone apps on it, while devs ported over apps to the big screen. 

                                       

                                      Google turned android loose into the world without as much of an app market - but they were letting the phone companies implement most of it.   A key value of Android to Google was that it gave them real-time updates to their mapping service by coordinating GPS readouts with wifi access points - no need to drive the cars around. 

                                       

                                      Android was available to pretty much anyone who wnated to shave a few bucks off the cost of a handset and make it a smartphone, a lot of companies were willing to take the risk.  And Google could afford to underwrite the losses since what they got in return was an incredible enhancement to their mapping service. 

                                       

                                      By the time Google proper entered the 7 inch device space, they had a huge app maket, easily competitive with iTunes. 

                                       

                                      Barnes and Noble, by contrast, introduced this insanely great piece of hardware with no clue at all about how to get anyone to use it or develop for it.

                                       

                                      Barnes and Noble actively discouraged development on their platform and for their shop.  .

                                       

                                      They completely and permanently alienated a lot of people by making the Nook Tablet much harder to make useful than the Nook Color had been. I have to admit to being surprised at how much ill will the Tablet created.  It was more work, yes, but only for a few months.  I recently wiped and gifted the NCs and NT and all of them were about equally simple to re-root. 

                                       

                                      Be that as it may - Barnes and Noble has had two years of experience in the 7" device space.  For a year of that time, they were almost alone and completely led the market in terms of sales. 

                                       

                                      In two years, and Apple or a Google or an Amazon would have made sure they had

                                       

                                      - app development sewn up after seeing what XDA had to teach about the device

                                       

                                      - content deals lined up after seeing what Apple was able to do selling music and video

                                       

                                      Instead, two years in, BN has a marginally at best improved app store, an on-device book experience that has improved little and taken some big steps backward, no music licensing deals cut and almost no video deals of its own cut. 

                                       

                                      Fortunately for me, they accidentally went back to the Nook Color model of great, fun-to-tinker-with hardware.  The HD+, at least for me, is a real step up from the Nook Tablet and Nook Color. 

                                       

                                      But from a marketing viewpoint?  It is harder to recommend this device, largely because the SD card implementation is disastrous. 

                                       

                                      It works pretty well for rooting the device and for running alternate OSes. 

                                       

                                      It works terribly for actually storing things I want to use on the Nook. 

                                       

                                      Paradoxically, the SD card slot implementation makes the Kindle or Nexus an easier device to recommend to most people because I know the SD implementation on those devices can't make trouble.

                                       

                                      The problem undoubtedly started with Google, which hopes to phase out support for the whole concept of a file system (that is not a joke, btw) but BN needed to test and understand the issue long before releasing the device. 

                                        • Re: Management saw the Nook Color and executed pretty well on what they learned
                                          flyingtoastr

                                          roustabout wrote:

                                           

                                          Much before Apple released the iPad Mini - and even before they launched the iPad, or launched the iPhone - they had experience building walled gardens.  First, they had an OS in which there very few vendors working, the MacOS.  Lots of shareware, but how many core, non-Apple applications?  An accidental wall.   


                                          To be fair, this is far more a result on the fact that coding for Mac OS (Objective C with Cocoa) is different than coding for Windows (C++/C#/C), with a very small marketshare to make up the time it takes to do so. There were plenty of companies happy to do the work to create OSX native applications (Adobe being the most prominent, of course), and Apple didn't have any artificial boundries on who could publish software for their platforms until iOS.

                                           

                                          As an interesting sidebar, it feels like ever since Apple switched to x86 processors capable of dual-booting into Windows many more vendors have chosen not to support OSX native and just tell me to "put a copy of windows" on my computer. Pain in the butt.

                                          • Re: Management saw the Nook Color and executed pretty well on what they learned

                                            I think you're giving too much credit to Amazon and Apple and Google.

                                             

                                            1) Google isn't making very much money from Android phones or Tablets.

                                             

                                            2) Amazon is doing well but no one knows how well. They are a very strong contendor to be a Top 3 Tablet company in the long-term. However, nothing is sewn up yet.

                                             

                                            3) Apple had a LOT of advantages. They have been a hardware and software company since the 1980s.

                                             

                                            *****

                                             

                                            From my perspective (and I'm only looking at it as strategy), the biggest mistake B&N made was talk about how well Nook Color was selling. In the first holiday season itself they did that. Talking about 700K sales a month and such. That gave everyone an early idea.

                                             

                                            The right thing would have been to paint a picture of it failing and ramp up agressively secretly.

                                             

                                            B&N also assumed that

                                             

                                            a) Kindle Fire wouldn't arrive for years.

                                            b) Other companies won't follow suit

                                            c) That Nook had more of a lead than it actually had (just 6 months or so, in reality).

                                             

                                            Or perhaps it just believed no one else would enter the space.

                                             

                                            There did seem to be a lot of complacency in how they approached things.

                                             

                                            The App Store is a good example. However, I think the biggest failures were -

                                             

                                            1) Not iterating on the reading experience.

                                            2) Not nailing down Email and Surfing and Facebook.

                                            3) Not expanding into movies and music and audiobooks earlier (well, music they still haven't).

                                             

                                            App Store is a bit of a chicken and egg problem. People won't come until it's large. And it's just too many people to contact and work with.

                                             

                                            Things like books and music and movies where you have big companies (5 to 10) that control 50% to 70% of the market are easier to build up quickly.

                                             

                                            *****

                                            Apple had too much of an advantage. It had all this experience with iPods and iPhones etc. it could leverage. And Apple had been working on iPad/iPhone since 2000.

                                             

                                            *****

                                            I think that's a challenge for any company. You create a niche and then the market giants will come after if it's there's an opportunity.

                                             

                                            Your only hope is to either differentiate spectacularly or move super fast.

                                            B&N being such a huge company it's almost impossibl for it to move super fast. In terms of differentiating it seems to have chosen 'Reading Tablet' as the method. But that's not a good strategy if you don't focus super sharply on the reading experience.

                                        • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
                                          BruceMcF

                                          TnTexas wrote:

                                          Speaking of the Nook Video Store, can it only be accessed via one of the HD tablets? I ask because with my PC, I could only locate 1 page for it, and that page only has 35 videos listed. Surely there's more to the store than that.


                                          As far as I understand, it can only be accessed from the HD tablets until they start releasing their other apps/channels.

                                            • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
                                              TnTexas

                                              BruceMcF: As far as I understand, it can only be accessed from the HD tablets until they start releasing their other apps/channels.

                                               

                                              That's what I was assuming. Wonder whose brilliant idea that was. Sigh.

                                                • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
                                                  I wish that b&n would have nook study work on HD/HD+. I recently started to continue my college education. I would rather have my e textbooks available on my reader then carry several large heavy books. I think that's a huge missed opportunity. Especially if they made HD/HD+ the exclusive tablet for nook study. My expectation for my nookHD+ was that it would continue to be the great reading experience that my nook1e was with some bonus features of interactive magazines & cookbooks. So far I find myself continuing to use my nook1e. I think for me the navigation of the HD+ is my biggest turnoff. Some of that is just something I will have to get more familiar with some is that the navigation is not intuitive.
                                                  • Re: What the NOOK is Versus What people want NOOK to be
                                                    BruceMcF

                                                    TnTexas wrote:

                                                    BruceMcF: As far as I understand, it can only be accessed from the HD tablets until they start releasing their other apps/channels.

                                                     

                                                    That's what I was assuming. Wonder whose brilliant idea that was. Sigh.


                                                    A marketing team that doesn't understand marketing in the "look it up on google" age. They ought to have a web page that shows all of their content, as soon as its available, and make it easy for their market to find them.

                                                     

                                                    But given that they do not even make it easy to find books for people who own their devices hooked straight into their online bookstore, its not surprising that they do not understand the benefits of making it easy for your market to find you.