2 Replies Latest reply on Jun 3, 2014 3:25 PM by bobstro

    BitLit Helps You Get E-Book Versions Of The Physical Books You Already Own

    bobstro

      An interesting article in TechCrunch about a service to (legally) obtain ebook versions of physical books you own. Sounds like a service B&N could easily provide. Kobo's founder has invested, so perhaps Kobo is planning to do this already: 

       

      "... Chances are, you’ve got a good number of those old-school physical books in your house but have mostly moved to e-books at this point. What if you could potentially get a cheap or free e-book copy of some of those books? That’s what BitLit promises its users.


      The Vancouver, Canada-based startup is working with publishers directly to offer readers discounted or free e-book versions of the physical books they already own. In addition, BitLit makes it easier for publishers to bundle e-books with their physical books."

        • Re: BitLit Helps You Get E-Book Versions Of The Physical Books You Already Own
          keriflur

          Amazon is already doing this, I think they're calling it kindle match. 

            • Re: BitLit Helps You Get E-Book Versions Of The Physical Books You Already Own
              bobstro

              So if Kobo does it and B&N is doesn't...

               

              It seems like low hanging fruit in terms of customer-focused service. The mobile app is an interesting variation. Write your name on the book, snap a pic of the title page and you can get a free/discounted ebook version. Only 10K books in the system so far, but simple enough to use. 

               

              To claim you eBook:
              - Take a photo of your book cover.
              - Write your name on the book's copyright page and take a photo. 
              - Once you have your eBook, you can read it on any and all of your devices: Kobo, Nook, Kindle, or iPad.

               

               I just tried it out, and the only match off my shelf so far has been for an O'Reilly programming book, for which it linked me to the $4.95 standard O'Reilly upgrade offer. Not overly impressive, but 1.) The app worked and 2.) they have some titles in their catalog, even if not many. Looking at the list of publishers, it looks like mostly small houses so far (not too surprising).

               

              What's even more interesting is that, according to the app description, they seem to manually verify each claim before releasing the book. A niche for service differentiation?