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      • 210. Re: Ebook Prices
        jynclr wrote:
         

        Yabbut ... let me ask you this.

         

        However, initial production costs should, at some point, be paid for and maintenance costs are generally lower than production costs, so, in theory (maybe not in practice) the price of the eBook "should" go lower.

        You're correct, it should.  The agency model handles this by discounting the ebook when the paperback comes out.

         

        But I took Elfs original comment to imply that ebooks should be priced much lower immediately upon release. This will be entirely possible for publishers as soon as Elf can tell them exactly how many copies a given ebook will sell.

        Elfsshadow wrote:

        Hrmm  I don't see where they are going to need to maintain, say printing presses, forklifts, or trucks in an ebook world but I do take your point. 

         

        Now unlimited supply will have and impact on price.  Its just a matter if the publishers lower the prices willingly or the are forced to by pirates. 

        The cost of printing, et al, as has been discussed many times here, is a small part of the cost of the book.  More important, there is much more to overhead than printing and forklifts.

         

        As to piracy, lets look at a real-world example.  Itunes relaxed DRM on their content and concurrently raised prices 30% to compensate for anticipated losses to theft.

         

        This is true for all businesses:  honest consumers pay for theft by others.

         

        So, those advocating piracy of ebooks (whatever happened to GlobalTech?) are advocating that honest consumers pay more for ebooks.

         

        • 211. Re: Ebook Prices

           

          eDigest wrote:

          You're correct, it should.  The agency model handles this by discounting the ebook when the paperback comes out.

           

          But I took Elfs original comment to imply that ebooks should be priced much lower immediately upon release. This will be entirely possible for publishers as soon as Elf can tell them exactly how many copies a given ebook will sell.

          Elfsshadow wrote:

          Hrmm  I don't see where they are going to need to maintain, say printing presses, forklifts, or trucks in an ebook world but I do take your point. 

           

          Now unlimited supply will have and impact on price.  Its just a matter if the publishers lower the prices willingly or the are forced to by pirates. 

          The cost of printing, et al, as has been discussed many times here, is a small part of the cost of the book.  More important, there is much more to overhead than printing and forklifts.

           

          As to piracy, lets look at a real-world example.  Itunes relaxed DRM on their content and concurrently raised prices 30% to compensate for anticipated losses to theft.

           

          This is true for all businesses:  honest consumers pay for theft by others.

           

          So, those advocating piracy of ebooks (whatever happened to GlobalTech?) are advocating that honest consumers pay more for ebooks.

           

           

          Actully most of what I have been saying is just for logical aurgument.   I actully have no problem paying, say $12.99 for changes by Jim Butcher.  Ill wait for new authors and ones that Im less addicted to drop in price.

           

          I think after they see sales figures increasing they will drop the prices but that will probably take years.  I think they will see sales go up for more reasons then unlimited supplies.  Convience factors are huge with this format shift. Think DVD rentals vs ondemand and netflix.

          Also, I don't know how many books I have wanted to read that I could not just cause I could not lay hands on a copy. 

           

          Now the piracy argument I have been raising is not advocating it.  I grew up reading.  I owe authors to much for keeping me sane to want them to get ripped off and stolen from.  I just fear that will be what happens if the publishers don't price to compete with their only real competetor.

           

           

           

          • 212. Re: Ebook Prices
            sub_rosa
            eDigest wrote:

            This is true for all businesses:  honest consumers pay for theft by others.

             

            So, those advocating piracy of ebooks (whatever happened to GlobalTech?) are advocating that honest consumers pay more for ebooks.

             

            The cat is chasing its tail - some consumers turn to piracy because of high prices of eBooks, which prompts publishers to raise prices, which prompts some consumers to turn to piracy because of high prices of eBooks, which prompts publishers to raise prices...

             

            Raising prices isn't the only response to piracy (or any kind of business loss).  In fact, I think it's probably the least effective method of dealing with it.  But they're the publishers - they set the price, and they'll have to deal with the consequences of their decisions.

             

            • 213. Re: Ebook Prices
              keriflur

               

              eDigest wrote:

              jynclr wrote:
               

              Yabbut ... let me ask you this.

               

              However, initial production costs should, at some point, be paid for and maintenance costs are generally lower than production costs, so, in theory (maybe not in practice) the price of the eBook "should" go lower.

              You're correct, it should.  The agency model handles this by discounting the ebook when the paperback comes out.

               

               

              That's a great theory about how Macmillian has told us the agency model should work.  However, as far as I know no one else has committed to this, and even for Macmillian it's just a plan, not a promise.  In actuality, the way the agency model works is this - publisher sets price, retailer charges price, consumer decides whether to buy.  The publishers charge whatever they want.  There's nothing intrinsic in the agency model that guarantees lower prices over time.

               

              • 214. Re: Ebook Prices

                Unless their sales decrease.

                • 215. Re: Ebook Prices
                  keriflur

                   

                  Elfsshadow wrote:

                  Unless their sales decrease.

                   

                   

                  That would be the logical thing to do, but we've already seen quite a bit of illogical behaviour in ebook pricing, so there's no guarantee we're going to start to see logical behaviour any time soon.

                   

                  • 216. Re: Ebook Prices
                    sub_rosa wrote:

                    some consumers turn to piracy because of high prices of eBooks

                    Call me jaded, but I think the "high price" of ebooks is a rationalization for bad behavior, not the root cause.....

                    • 217. Re: Ebook Prices

                      I love my Nook. It is such a shame I can't buy as many books as I want to because I object to the unethical pricing of the books. For instance, I would love to buy The Mysterious Benedict Society, however I notice that the paperback price is only $6.99 and the ebook is $9.99.

                       

                       

                      I understand that Apple is having a big impact on the pricing of ebooks these days. However, I'm not as satisfied with their pay scheme for books as I am with the scheme they use for songs. I do want to support my authors, and once these little pricing issues are corrected I will buy hoards of ebooks.

                       

                      In the meantime I'll support my local library. I'll be transformed back into a paying customer once the prices are acceptable.

                      • 218. Re: Ebook Prices

                        I thought this was OVER..... When B&N dropped prices for the release of the nook. Now they raise them again, quietly, as an insult to their customers!

                         

                        I had over 25 eBooks queued up for purchase but at the new prices I'll just find them in a library or wait for a cheap paperback to come out....

                         

                        I already have about 300 PDF eBooks to sideload so I won't want for good reading material...Its just that B&N won't be getting my money.

                         

                        The prices are just not set at a rational level. They should equal or better the paperback cost. If the book is not in paperback yet it should still be cheaper by far than the Hardcover.

                         

                        You can bet there will be sites pop up where lending eBooks will be the way to go..Then you can pay their exorbitant prices for one or two books and parlay them into a dozen or more good reads......

                        • 219. Re: Ebook Prices

                          I last bought an ebook on 3/24/2010.  I logged on today to browse new releases and was shocked and appalled at the cost of books just one month later.  A month ago, most were 9.99.  Now they are upwards of 15.00!  I can buy a new hardcover at Walmart for that!  I had convinced a friend of mine to buy a Nook because of the lower prices of ebooks.  I believe I'll tell her to forget it and continue to visit the local library.  Shame on B&N!!  I love my Nook, but I think it's going to start gathering dust for a while until paperbacks come out and prices are lowered. 

                          • 220. Re: Ebook Prices
                            Doug_Pardee
                            gordoboy wrote:

                            Shame on B&N!!  I love my Nook, but I think it's going to start gathering dust for a while until paperbacks come out and prices are lowered. 

                            It's not B&N's fault. Please read the other postings in this thread, and many of the other threads on e-book prices.

                             

                            Apple worked a deal with five of the 'Big 6' publishing houses to not allow e-books to be sold anywhere for less than they sell for the iPad. The publishing houses did this by changing their contracts with everybody so that the publisher sets the prices, not the retailer. They call this the 'Agency Model': the publisher is the seller and sets the prices, while B&N, Amazon, etc. are only agents who collect a 30% commission and are forbidden to give any discounts. Many of the smaller e-book stores don't even carry those titles right now (Fictionwise, Powell's, etc.).

                             

                            • 221. Re: Ebook Prices

                              Everything I had on my whist's has went up by several dollars per book.  As much as 8.00 on one.  Ridiculous.

                              I can go to borders and use my 40% off coupons, buy a book and read it, then take it to a used book store, trade in several and get store credit which goes to several more books.  I can't even use my Barnes & Noble membership to receive even a small discount on my e-books.  That alone is insulting- they should offer some sort of e-book club if they really expect us to use their product.  I can get e-books through Sony/borders and then convert them for cheaper.

                              Also, how is it that can buy a hardcover for the price of an e-book?  So what if it takes up more space?  I can trade it in, trade it with friends- oh and hey- I didn't have to spend $259.00 for a way to read it.

                              Are people really using piracy as an excuse?  What is the difference between a group of 10 friends all buying 1 book, each different, then trading those books within their own circle.  Publishers just lost out on 100 books to then ten it cost those friends.  Same goes for printed books which can be resold through other stores, who are making money on these books.

                              There is no excuse for this.  Really.  Nothing that justifies it in the customers mind when just weeks ago some of these books were literally half of the price.

                              I was buying 6-8 books at a time, but now.  Maybe ONE if they are lucky. 

                              • 222. Re: Ebook Prices

                                Well I am saying good by to my nook today.  Ebay here we come.  I got a Nook due to the lower cost of eBooks and t that my daughter reads 6 to 8 books a month.  Why pay more for the eBook when I can get the paper back on sale cheaper and then donate it to charity. 

                                • 223. Re: Ebook Prices

                                  im so upset that they have made ebooks more expensive than regular paperbacks!! last time i checked paperbacks are 7 dollars or sometimes even less.. I would think since books start off on a computer before being printed that ebooks would be much cheaper than any book out in stores. I got my nook because i read 3 to 4 books a week and now i have had to go back to reading regular paperback or hardcover books because i refuse to buy a book at 12 or 16 dollars that i can find at 5 dollars at the store.. BN waited for everyone to fall in love with the nook and buy it before they started raising the prices on all books. it makes me wish i would have not got the nook and just stuck to regular books. =(.. i am very disappointed in BN...

                                  • 224. Re: Ebook Prices
                                    Doug_Pardee
                                    iluvjcksparrw wrote:

                                    BN waited for everyone to fall in love with the nook and buy it before they started raising the prices on all books. it makes me wish i would have not got the nook and just stuck to regular books. =(.. i am very disappointed in BN...

                                     

                                    Go back and read the rest of this thread. It wasn't B&N.

                                     

                                    Apple went to the publishers and said, "When we introduce the iPad we won't sell any e-books that anyone sells for less than we do." Five of the 'Big 6' publishing houses said "Okay" and instituted what they've called 'Agency Model' pricing at the beginning of April when the iPad was introduced.

                                     

                                    Those five publishers raised the prices, and the e-book sellers don't have any choices. If they sell for less than what those publishers say, the publishers will cut them off.

                                     

                                    If you want to blame someone, blame Apple.