3 Replies Latest reply on Feb 8, 2012 4:08 PM by GDJ
      • Re: Another opinion...."The Problem with eBook Pricing"

        I agree with your pricing issues, and add that until the publishers improve their scanning/proofing of e-books, I'm not even happy paying used paperback prices!

         

        When I have paid the price of a new paperback (today's prices) for a book that was originally published in the 60s, and the e-book contains multitudes of errors in punctuation, capitalization, words run together, improper paragraph breaks (both where there should not be breaks and also not breaking where they should) etc., I am certainly not happy and am not inclined to buy more e-books from that same publisher. And I'm running out of publishers!

          • Re: Another opinion...."The Problem with eBook Pricing"
            BruceMcF

            CascaraBorzoi wrote:

            I agree with your pricing issues, and add that until the publishers improve their scanning/proofing of e-books, I'm not even happy paying used paperback prices!

             

            When I have paid the price of a new paperback (today's prices) for a book that was originally published in the 60s, and the e-book contains multitudes of errors in punctuation, capitalization, words run together, improper paragraph breaks (both where there should not be breaks and also not breaking where they should) etc., I am certainly not happy and am not inclined to buy more e-books from that same publisher. And I'm running out of publishers!


            Way to pick the hardest case as your example. Much earlier than the 1960's, and an increasing number of the titles are in the public domain, and can rely on a army of volunteers to fix the mountain of Optical Character Recognition errors that happen whenever you scan in an old book from print. Get into the 80's and beyond, and an increasing number of works will have electronic copies of their text, which makes it much easier to generate an ebook that is not full of the typical OCR errors that you list. Indeed, professional author's were an important early market for microcomputers in the later 1970's with their 64kbyte memories and slow, small capacity floppy disk drives.

             

            But the 1960's? If those are still under copyright, you are talking about paying to get those OCR errors caught and fixed. And given the low sales levels of half century old books, and the fact that they are being sold at a steep discount to the original hard cover price which originally repaid the cost of checking the original printed proofs ... how realistic is it to expect that all of the OCR errors will get caught? Especially since if you pay minimum wage for proofing, you get minimum wage quality proofing.

             

            Even if they are in the public domain, with the way that the Congress has been abusing the copyright periods to make Disney happy, in many cases it will have only been recently into the public domain, which means it will only have been receiving error reports at Project Gutenburg (and similar projects) for a limited numbers of years.

             

          • Re: Another opinion...."The Problem with eBook Pricing"
            GDJ

            That was an interesting article.  However, it has not been my experience that ebooks are more expensive than paper, from my observation, they seem usually to be a few bucks cheaper on average.  Indeed the author just lists a small comparison table, where are the real statistics here?   Also, why should we assume ebooks should be cheaper just based on the fact they are less costly to produce and distribute?  If people are willing to pay a premium to get a digital copy, the ebooks will cost more.

             

            Understandably, the author wants cheaper prices, doesn't everyone?