7 Replies Latest reply on May 31, 2011 8:45 AM by BooksOnTheKnob

    Libraries: No New EBooks

      It seems that now that the last publisher caved in to the agency model, there are virtually no best sellers available in epub format at the libraries.  Checking Overdrive, only 3 of the first 12 top NYTimes best sellers are available in any US ilbrary.  Interesting. So it's not even that the libraries can't afford to purchase ebooks using the newest, absurd licensing model, but the books themselvare are not even being made available.  I wonder if this comes from the authors or the publishers themselves, as authors that I used to find in libraries no longer seem to be making their newest available. Either way, the publishers have won:  there's a new price point (upwards of $12.99); and, more importantly for them, there are no free reads:  they are keeping books out of libraries, either permanently or at the minimum are not making them available in the first weeks after release (thereby shutting out the option of some e-reader users to wait for a new book to become available at a local library).  The "new books" seen at libraries now, or those listed as "bestsellers" are at least 6-10 months old.

       

      Kind of sad.  Although I applaud ereader use, I am sad to think that libraries are dying....

       

       

       

       

        • Re: Libraries: No New EBooks
          Doug_Pardee

          DenisePW wrote:

           

          they are keeping books out of libraries, either permanently or at the minimum are not making them available in the first weeks after release (thereby shutting out the option of some e-reader users to wait for a new book to become available at a local library).


          That may or may not be the case. Libraries have to buy the e-books to get them available, and that usually involves some administrative work. Government agencies aren't known for moving quickly — except when they're out to get you — so this could be just be paperwork delay.

           

          Or it could indeed be at the publisher's end.

           

            • Re: Libraries: No New EBooks
              Ya_Ya

              Doug_Pardee wrote:

               Government agencies aren't known for moving quickly — except when they're out to get you — so this could be just be paperwork delay.

               

              Or it could indeed be at the publisher's end.

               


              *dons Pollyanna Sunshine cap*

               

              Or it could just be libraries deciding that since Harper Collins has neutered their ebooks, the other pulblisehrs might follow suit and it's better to hold onto the budgeted funds rather than piss them down the toilet.  They could just be waiting to see what happens.

            • Re: Libraries: No New EBooks

              Interstingly enough, ebooks at libraries are handled very much the same way as print books.  They purchase the rights for so many downloads at one time (usually one or two).  That license pricing, from what one librarian told me, is not nearly the same as an ebook price you and I pay when buying one.  

               

              As time goes on, these new challenges will even out.  

                • Re: Libraries: No New EBooks

                  Yes and hopefully it'll be the independents that lead the way.

                  • Re: Libraries: No New EBooks
                    One of the libraries I go to adds new books all the time. They've had e-books for approximately 8 months but already have over 1,700 fiction titles and most having waiting lists. Of the other libraries I hold cards at, two add books regularly and the others add sporadically, but all generally add books around the first of the month. They may not be bestsellers, but I usually have no interest in bestsellers. I keep track to get in a good spot on the waiting lists. 

                     


                    Brad_W wrote:

                    That license pricing, from what one librarian told me, is not nearly the same as an ebook price you and I pay when buying one.  



                    My sister is a reference librarian and in charge of the non-fiction e-book purchases for her library. Your librarian source is right -- libraries pay much more than we do for their e-books. My sister says a cheap e-book is in the low 20s and most are more than that. I'm not sure what her budget is each quarter. She won't buy HarperCollins books anymore since they added the 26 checkout limitation. She doesn't want to squander her tiny budget.

                  • Re: Libraries: No New EBooks
                    P_Warten

                    When I worked in libraries, we would only get the new bestsellers about 2-4 weeks after they were in the bookstores first.  Booksellers want you to buy first.  Rarely did they ship leased copies to libraries at the same time as the bookstores (if it was a surefire bestseller like a Harry Potter title).  So I'm not surprised it takes a few weeks for Overdrive to display the new books.

                      • Re: Libraries: No New EBooks
                        BooksOnTheKnob

                        P_Warten wrote:

                        When I worked in libraries, we would only get the new bestsellers about 2-4 weeks after they were in the bookstores first.  Booksellers want you to buy first.  Rarely did they ship leased copies to libraries at the same time as the bookstores (if it was a surefire bestseller like a Harry Potter title).  So I'm not surprised it takes a few weeks for Overdrive to display the new books.


                        Which is probably why some library systems buy from Amazon (cheaper, available day one).