5 Replies Latest reply on Jul 14, 2014 8:31 AM by bobstro

    So... How about an atlas?

    Zeph

      Since I bought my NOOK I'be been trying to stock it with various useful reference books, with mixed success.  One item I have not been able to locate in the NOOK store is a World Atlas.  This seems like such a natural for the more tablet-oriented NOOKS that I don't understand why none seems to be available.

       

      There are hoards of specialty "atlases":  Cloud Atlas; State of the World Atlas; Atlas of Mangroves(?!) ...  And there are a few hugely simplified atlases, apparently intended for children (although I drew more detailed maps when I was in 5th grade).  And there are even free world atlases, which are great if you don't mind maps that are 100 years (or more) out of date.

       

      But apparently nothing equivalent to a contemporary Rand McNalley World Atlas.  Unless someone here has some leads?

       

      (And no, Google Maps is not an acceptable option; I'm not always in range of WiFi...)

        • Re: So... How about an atlas?

          I happen to have a hardcover Goode's World Atlas by Rand-McNally.  Unfortunately, it was published in 1964 and printed in 1966, so it has limited utility.

           

          A couple of months ago, I went to my local Barnes and Noble B&M book store to purchase a new atlas.  Much to my surprise, the store did not have an atlas in stock.  They had books of road maps, but no atlas.  :smileysad:

           

          Looking at the detail in my old hardcover atlas, it is difficult to imagine how all of that could be displayed on a portable electronic device of any sort, especially a NOOK with its relatively small screen. 

            • Re: So... How about an atlas?
              flyingtoastr

              deesy58 wrote:

               

              A couple of months ago, I went to my local Barnes and Noble B&M book store to purchase a new atlas.  Much to my surprise, the store did not have an atlas in stock.  They had books of road maps, but no atlas.  :smileysad:


              You were in the wrong section. At BN, world atlases aren't kept with the maps and road atlases, but with the reference and science books. Every store should have a couple.

              • Re: So... How about an atlas?
                Zeph

                deesy58 wrote:

                I happen to have a hardcover Goode's World Atlas by Rand-McNally.  Unfortunately, it was published in 1964 and printed in 1966, so it has limited utility.


                 Heh.  For years I used a 1952 Rand-McHally that I slavaged from a free book bin; finally my mom sent me a new one in 2010.  Who knew there were all those countries in Africa? :smileyhappy:

                 

                 


                 

                A couple of months ago, I went to my local Barnes and Noble B&M book store to purchase a new atlas.  Much to my surprise, the store did not have an atlas in stock.  They had books of road maps, but no atlas.  :smileysad:

                 

                Looking at the detail in my old hardcover atlas, it is difficult to imagine how all of that could be displayed on a portable electronic device of any sort, especially a NOOK with its relatively small screen. 


                The resolution's pretty good on the HD+, and there is always the "zoom" feature.
              • Re: So... How about an atlas?
                bobstro

                Dean and I don't seem to agree a bit on a lot of things, but we're exchanging messages without getting personal or insulting about it. There's still a lot of common ground. I suggest not taking what's written here personally.

                 

                I personally don't feel so much that healthcare is an entitlement that everybody in the world is due as I feel that it's a worthy goal for America to ensure that our citizens are taken care of. In my mind, healthcare is right up there with military might and moonshots in terms of national pride. American exceptionalism isn't based on the soil we stand on, but how we treat our own. We were at our finest when we strove to improve the lives of all rather than preserving turf and turning on each other.