4 Replies Latest reply: Jul 7, 2012 9:11 AM by DeanGibson

    v1.4.3 roots fine

    DeanGibson

      If you use Titanium Backup to backup all your application settings before updating, and then restore them after the update and rooting, it doesn't even take very long.

        • Re: v1.4.3 roots fine

          Hmm, Titanium is not working for me - it appears that one of the "improvements"

          was deleting /system/bin/su

           

          All my apps requiring superuser privileges are now broken.

           

          I thought I had blocked OTA, I guess I didn't and now it is completely

          borked.  Thanks for nothing BN.

           

          Is "su" still resident on your system?

            • Re: v1.4.3 roots fine
              DeanGibson

              GMilliorn wrote:

              Hmm, Titanium is not working for me - it appears that one of the "improvements" was deleting /system/bin/su

               

              All my apps requiring superuser privileges are now broken.

               

              I thought I had blocked OTA, I guess I didn't and now it is completely borked.  Thanks for nothing BN.

               

              Is "su" still resident on your system?


              Pretty much every Android device upgrade from a manufacturer involves replacing the entire /system subdirectory structure.  Additional apps that you install yourself are typically in /data/app, and those are usually not touched, but if they require root, they are non-functional.  There are some rooting processes that leave a "back door" so that manufacturer upgrades can be easily re-rooted, but those are often unreliable after rooting is completed (eg, after the Android Market and other Google basic apps are installed).  The one I use didn't work after the upgrade to 1.4.2, so I didn't even try it after 1.4.3, because I was in a hurry (if I have to do it again, I may try that).

               

              When B&N comes out with an upgrade for the Nook Tablet, I:

               

              1. Use Titanium Backup to back up all my installed Android apps, and all my settings (eg, brower bookmarks, WiFi access points, Calendar settings, etc).
              2. Do a factory restore to 1.4.0 (because that can be easily rooted).
              3. Unregister and reregister the device (that wipes all installed content).
              4. Get root access and install the "back door", but don't complete the rooting process (eg, don't install the Android Market or other Google apps).
              5. Upgrade to the new B&N release.
              6. Regain root access through the "back door" and complete the rooting process (eg, install the Android Market and some other Google basic apps, and register with Google).
              7. Let the Android Market upgrade itself to"Google Play" (which will occur within a couple hours).
              8. Reinstall Titanium Backup from the Android Market.
              9. Reinstall all my Android apps.  I believe Titanium Backup will do that from the backups, but I haven't tried that;  I reinstall from the Android Market, and then use Titanium Backup to just restore the "data" (settings) for each app.

               

              Steps 2-6 take exactly 30 minutes;  the Titanium Backup stuff takes an hour or so.

               

              Anyone who thinks that this process is a lot simpler on a regular Android tablet or phone, hasn't tried it.  Yes, you MAY not have to reinstall all your apps, but you will still have to find a way to re-root the device, and you will still have to reinstall the Android Market and the other Google basic apps, because they also reside in /system.

               

              When I bought my Acer A500 tablet, it came with Android 3.1.  In order to root it, I had to find and revert to a copy of v3.0 that was really unstable (eg, the keyboard was unreliable -- that was fun, having the keyboard disappear in the middle of typing), root it, and then upgrade to v3.2.  Fortunately, the upgrade to v4.0 and re-rooting was easy (using a different rooting tool than for v3.0), but there are never any guarantees.

               

              When I rooted my Motorola Droid phone, I had to install on my PC the Motorola manufacturing tools for reflashing the device and use that.

               

              Nook owners (except for the Nook 1st edition) have it easy, because you can boot from the SD card slot.  For the Nook Touch, Glow, Color, and Tablet, you can go to the XDA-dev forums and find a (device-specific) rooting tool that boots from the SD card slot, and use that.  That makes getting access for rooting trivial.  I don't use that technique on my Nook Tablet, only because I developed my own (above) before the tool for the Tablet was released.

               

              Nook 1st edition (v1.5-1.7) owners root the device by exploiting an instability in the browser that gives them root access for just a few seconds.  In those few seconds, you have to complete the next step or start over.  The first time I tried it, it took just a few minutes of retries, and I thought, "This was easy".  The next time I had to do it, it took several hours.

               

              Welcome to the world of rooting.

            • Re: v1.4.3 roots fine
              compulsivereaderTX

              DeanGibson wrote:

              If you use Titanium Backup to backup all your application settings before updating, and then restore them after the update and rooting, it doesn't even take very long.


              Hey Dean. Do you know if this works on the NookColor too? I'm having a difficult time finding information on this.

                • Re: v1.4.3 roots fine
                  DeanGibson

                  compulsivereaderTX wrote:

                  Hey Dean. Do you know if this works on the NookColor too? I'm having a difficult time finding information on this.


                  Roustabout has current info on the Nook Color.

                   

                  When I had the Nook Color, I used the so-called "Manual Nooter" procedure from May of 2011, and I think that's what Roustabout uses.  If I had to do it again, I would probably just boot one of the tools that give me access to the Nook's internal files, and do the rooting myself.

                   

                  Reason:  Many of the "Nooter"-type tools make the process fairly painless for the user, but install apps that the designer of the tool likes (eg, a particular app launcher), and in many cases, reconfigure the Nook's Android "profile", so that the device appears to a specific device other than a Nook.  This is often done so that the Android Market will allow apps to be installed, that wouldn't otherwise be "qualified" to install on a Nook (eg, because they require a camera, phone, or GPS).

                   

                  While I have no objections to doing that, I would like to make that choice myself.  Currently Google thinks I still own a "LogicPD Zoom2", which is what it thought my Nook Color was.  If you have registered in the Android Market, you can see what devices Google thinks you have, at https://play.google.com/store/account (I stumbled across this about a week ago); log in and click on the "Settings" tab.

                   

                  When I developed my rooting process for the Nook Tablet, I made it "minimal":  I install some basic system tools, the Android Market, and basic Google apps.  I let the user choose the app launcher, but provide a link to the one I use.  I install the "su" binary but not the "SuperUser" application (especially now that there are choices for the latter).  I then tell users what I recommend that they install from the Android Market.  I now note that some other rooting tools are more minimal as well, doing the same thing.  I obviously think this is a good trend, in addition to the "all-in-one" procedures.