12 Replies Latest reply on Jan 2, 2011 5:45 PM by scott88

    Why did I buy a Nook if the books I want are unavailable?

      I recently purchased a Nook and thought that I was going to be able to purchase the books that I wanted. Well, I was wrong. I went to buy two new releases (Bloody Valentine and  Deadly Little Games) and there are not available as NookBooks! And it's not the publisher because Amazon has them as eBooks, so they do have it in that format. I know I can press the link that says I want it in Nook format, but I didn't buy a Nook to have to press a button everyday and hope that they release it. For what's the point of having a Nook if I have to buy a hardcover copy anyways? 

        • Re: Why did I buy a Nook if the books I want are unavailable?
          bklvr896

           


          stephaniezee wrote:

          I recently purchased a Nook and thought that I was going to be able to purchase the books that I wanted. Well, I was wrong. I went to buy two new releases (Bloody Valentine and  Deadly Little Games) and there are not available as NookBooks! And it's not the publisher because Amazon has them as eBooks, so they do have it in that format. I know I can press the link that says I want it in Nook format, but I didn't buy a Nook to have to press a button everyday and hope that they release it. For what's the point of having a Nook if I have to buy a hardcover copy anyways? 


          That's two books out of millions, me I've never run into not being able to get a book I wanted unless it simply wasn't available as a eBook.  It may be a time delay since it was only released 2 days ago.  Give it a chance, it may show up.  A search shows that currently, only Amazon has the first one, it may be that Amazon has an exclusive deal with that publisher, it may be they've only released the Kindle version and they have to send the ePub version to the other retailers.

           

          • Re: Why did I buy a Nook if the books I want are unavailable?

            The fact that it's available only on Amazon is a very big indicator that it *IS* the publisher. Either they've got an exclusive deal with Amazon, or more likely, they've not yet converted to ePub format yet (the eBook format that everyone BUT Amazon uses).

            • Re: Why did I buy a Nook if the books I want are unavailable?

              Well Stephaniezee,

               

              I would hope that you did research prior to buying your e-reader. I spent quite some time pouring over B&N's website to determine the quantity of eBooks that they had available for the nook. I decided the Nook was the right decision for me based on many reasons. You can get eBooks elsewhere (Sony, Amazon, etc.) if not available on B&N and side load them on to your Nook. So it's not like you can not read an eBook just because it's not available on B&N's site.

               

              Spend some time going over these threads and I'm sure you'll see at least half a dozen sites you can purchase eBooks at. I wish you the best of luck. Don't give up on your Nook just yet. You'll be surprised how much better Nook is compared to the other e-readers out there.

               

              Regards,

              Wrking21

               

               

              "I recently purchased a Nook and thought that I was going to be able to purchase the books that I wanted. Well, I was wrong. I went to buy two new releases (Bloody Valentine and  Deadly Little Games) and there are not available as NookBooks! And it's not the publisher because Amazon has them as eBooks, so they do have it in that format. I know I can press the link that says I want it in Nook format, but I didn't buy a Nook to have to press a button everyday and hope that they release it. For what's the point of having a Nook if I have to buy a hardcover copy anyways?"

                • Re: Why did I buy a Nook if the books I want are unavailable?
                  bklvr896

                   


                  PlumCrazee wrote:

                  Well Stephaniezee,

                   

                  I would hope that you did research prior to buying your e-reader. I spent quite some time pouring over B&N's website to determine the quantity of eBooks that they had available for the nook. I decided the Nook was the right decision for me based on many reasons. You can get eBooks elsewhere (Sony, Amazon, etc.) if not available on B&N and side load them on to your Nook. So it's not like you can not read an eBook just because it's not available on B&N's site.

                   


                   

                  You cannot purchase DRM books from Amazon or the iBookstore for the Nook.  Nook will read books from just about everywhere else, but both of those use a proprietary format.

                   

                   

                  • Re: Why did I buy a Nook if the books I want are unavailable?

                     


                     I decided the Nook was the right decision for me based on many reasons. You can get eBooks elsewhere (Sony, Amazon, etc.) if not available on B&N and side load them on to your Nook.

                     

                     


                    Um, not Amazon (unless you are willing to crack the DRM.)

                     

                  • Re: Why did I buy a Nook if the books I want are unavailable?
                    Desert_Brat

                    LOL I hear ya! There are lots of older books that I wish were in ebook format.

                     

                    Remember when Google decided to try and scan in every single book ever printed to make them searchable online? Maybe somebody will get excited and try to make every book ever printed available as an ebook. What a boon that would be to homebound folks and students.

                      • The Google Books Settlement
                        Doug_Pardee

                         


                        Desert_Brat wrote:

                         

                        Remember when Google decided to try and scan in every single book ever printed to make them searchable online? Maybe somebody will get excited and try to make every book ever printed available as an ebook.

                        Google wants to do that. There's this little teeny problem called copyright. Authors and such think they should be paid, or even have the option of denying publication.

                         

                        Almost a year ago, the Google Books Settlement was proposed which basically would give Google, and only Google, limited immunity on matters of copyright relating to books. The court still hasn't approved this proposed settlement, and many authors and other content creators (illustrators, cartographers, photographers, etc.) are concerned about the proposal because Google may end up with monopoly rights to sell e-books without the permission of the copyright holders, and without the copyright holders getting paid.

                         

                        It's an extremely complex situation, but the fundamental issue is this: Google scanned specific printed book versions. There's more to a book than just the author's words. Consequently, the publishers are considered to be the ones whose work has been copied. There are all sorts of variations of problems here, such as "publisher has gone out of business", "author's contract with the publisher expired", "author's contract with the publisher didn't provide for royalties on e-books" (almost guaranteed for any contract prior to 2000 or so), "author died and copyright ownership is in dispute", and "author's whereabouts are unknown". There are also complications when the work contains creations from multiple people, such as an anthology of the year's best short stories or a heavily illustrated book where the illustrations were done by someone other than the author.

                         

                        It's a giant mess. The proposed Google Books Settlement essentially proposes to bypass the mess by not worrying about paying authors if the situation isn't clear-cut.

                         

                        There are other questionable aspects of the proposed settlement, including Google having sole authority to decide which e-books to sell and which to suppress, and the authority to sell e-books that have been altered from the original (with the approval of the publisher or other rights-holder).

                         

                        The public doesn't have the right to demand that they be allowed to read any particular copyrighted work in any particular form. It's up to the copyright holder(s) to decide which works they will publish and in what forms, and what payment they will demand. J. D. Salinger refused to allow his works (after Catcher in the Rye) to be published because he couldn't stand the invasion of his privacy that publication entails. J. K. Rowling, Ray Bradbury, Harper Lee, and others, refuse to allow their works to be published in e-book form because they believe that books are to be printed on paper. Until those works pass out of copyright and into public domain, we cannot demand to read their works as e-books.

                         

                          • Re: The Google Books Settlement
                            Desert_Brat

                             


                            Doug_Pardee wrote:

                            ... J. K. Rowling, Ray Bradbury, Harper Lee, and others, refuse to allow their works to be published in e-book form because they believe that books are to be printed on paper. Until those works pass out of copyright and into public domain, we cannot demand to read their works as e-books.

                             


                             

                            Well shucks, Bradbury is one of my favorites! And this really shoots down my hope that the original Tassahara Bread Book will ever be an e-book :smileywink:

                             

                            Seriously though, I don't even pretend to understand all the ins and outs of publishers and such. But I would think that in this burgeoning electronic age the authors and publishers would welcome e-books as another avenue of sales and a means to get their works into as many readers' hands as possible.

                             

                            I mentioned in another thread about a number of authors who also have a podcast and release their books for free via the podcast or their website, usually in pdf form. And they do this usually just prior to the book going to print. Cory Doctorow posts free e-books on his website and thinks it's the best thing he's done. People who have read the free e-books usually go out and buy the hardcopies as well, as a show of fandom and to support their favorite author.

                             

                            A lot of first-time and indie authors release their works as individual podcasts and also compile them for a print edition. It's sort of like having an audiobook and then the ability to purchase a hardcopy as well. Just check out authors Scott Sigler, Murr Lafferty, Christiana Ellis, Tee Morris or J.C. Hutchins on iTunes.

                             

                            I'm thinking these authors probably release their own work first and then shop around for a publisher or self-publish. And it's fun to get an autographed copy when the work comes out in print.

                             

                            Possibly where Google went wrong was in making so much text available instead of just giving the sentence where a search reference appears and title/author of the book as well as a link to where the entire work would be available (like B&N!).

                        • Re: Why did I buy a Nook if the books I want are unavailable?

                           


                          stephaniezee wrote:

                           And it's not the publisher because Amazon has them as eBooks, so they do have it in that format. I know I can press the link that says I want it in Nook format


                          The publisher could release the book on the Kindle but not other ereaders that is up to the publisher. There is nothing that makes a publisher support all ereaders.