9 Replies Latest reply on Oct 8, 2013 5:10 AM by ConnieL4193

    Kindle to Nook - Three Weeks Later

      I really wasn't sure how this would go when one day I up and decided to give away my Kindle Fire HD and go over to a Nook HD+.  It was kind of like going from an iPhone to an Android device. Still, when I make these decsions, I always do it fully and with every intention of giving the new kid every opportunity to impress me and keep me as a customer.  I loved my Kindle and had no particular problem with it. I simply wanted a change.  So... Here are my thoughts some three weeks later.  While there are certainly pros and cons for one device over the other, generally speaking I can say I am becoming more and more happy with my decision.  The two biggest reasons for this are expandable memory (priceless) and the Google Play store available on the Nook.  Unlike many others, I specifically chose my device as an eReader first and a tablet second. I wanted my devices' primary focus to be on delivering book, magazines and newspaper content with some video thrown in for fun.  There is no way I could ever beat the price I paid for my Nook HD+ 32GB.  As a secondary factor in wanting to try the Nook vs the Kindle was so I could also be a part of the "in store" experience.  In this area, I think Barnes and Noble could realy step up their game and make it so compelling that I'd be running to the local B&N every other day (are you listening B&N?).  I find myself spending far more time playing on my Nook than I did on my Kindle, probably because there are more apps available to me but make no mistake about it, this an eReader first and foremost and everything else second. I love reading on it and while it's a tad more cumbersome (my Kindle was a 7" variety), I enjoy reading from the bigger screen and it's definitely easier to do with magazines.  I also love being able to "clip" pages from magazines and such for scrapbooks.  Nice touch Nook!  Honestly right now I really have very little reason to regret my decision to go Nook and look forward to many years as a Nook fan.  :heart:

        • Re: Kindle to Nook - Three Weeks Later
          eaglewomanEP

          So nice to finally have some one post a positive note about the NOOK. I love mine too.

            • Re: Kindle to Nook - Three Weeks Later

              I really hate it when people get on a board like this and do nothing but complain and usually about how this device isn't good because it isn't like that device. Well, duh. It isn't supposed to be. I really try to post constructive criticism whan I offer it. I also try to post positives about something.  I've rarely run into something so terrible that I felt the need to blast it and offer nothing good to say at all.

                • Re: Kindle to Nook - Three Weeks Later
                  bobstro

                  Keep in mind, some of us were "criticizing" B&N for not offering Google Play Store access way back on the NOOK Color. Apparently, our arguments had some merit, and B&N has at least gone that way on their latest devices. Not every suggestions is meant to be an argument. Some of us actually make helpful suggestions.

              • Re: Kindle to Nook - Three Weeks Later
                bobstro

                ConnieL4193 wrote:

                [...]  The two biggest reasons for this are expandable memory (priceless) and the Google Play store available on the Nook.

                 

                While the expandable memory has always been a NOOK feature, it took B&N a long time to realize that opening up access to the Google Play Store would be a positive. Fortunately, they did finally decide that getting some of a customer's app and content purchases was better than none.

                 

                [...]  As a secondary factor in wanting to try the Nook vs the Kindle was so I could also be a part of the "in store" experience.  In this area, I think Barnes and Noble could realy step up their game and make it so compelling that I'd be running to the local B&N every other day (are you listening B&N?).

                 

                I agree with this 100%. The in-store experience is something B&N has made some minor improvements to recently (buy one, get one deals) but they still could be doing a lot more.

                 

                Although I've moved off of NOOK tablet-like devices, I still am considering a new eInk device if they do a good job. I hope they adopt the same attitude with in-store experience, not requiring NOOK device ownership, but enhancing the experience for anybody running their app and will to spend good money with them.

                 

                B&N seems to be going through a metamorphosis, if it's not just a prolonged hibernation. I do still like the company, although I've been frustrated with them over the last couple of years. It will be interesting to see how they end this year. Hopefully, they'll reinvent themselves as the premiere reader's experience.

                  • Re: Kindle to Nook - Three Weeks Later

                    The Kindle and Nook will always compete and each will have its loyalists but there is NO reason that Barnes and Noble can't do a better job at competing in those areas where they can clearly do better or at least as good as Amazon.  Amazon cannot give you that in-store experience so WHY isn't B&N doing more to exploit that? Seriously. It just seems like a no brainer to me.  There is also no reason they can't come up with something to compete with Amazon Prime and its free video.  Come on B&N. You've been around long enough to put up a better fight. And as we all know, better competition is a win-win for everyone.  FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT!

                  • Re: Kindle to Nook - Three Weeks Later
                    BFCoughlin

                    am delighted to hear about how pleased you are with the Nook.  I've never had a Kindle, and I have no prejudice against them--but I have been delighted with my Nooks.  I opted for Nook over Kindle because at the time I was buying my first e-reader, only B&N had a color reader, and I wanted to be able to read magazines like National Geographic on the device.  After than I bought a Simple Touch when it was on sale to have something very light to carry around with me and to be able to read easly outdoors.  When the HD+ came out, I bought one because I loved the idea of the larger format.  I thought I'd use it more as a tablet, but I find that--like you--I use them all primarily as readers.  I do a little web browsing, play a few games on long car trips, but I'm not into watching movies on it (that's what the TV is for!)  Now that I have the Kindle app on it, I can even read books that con't come in Nook format.  I might be just s happy with a Kindle, but that's no matter.  The Nook serve me well. I'm glad to hear you are having such a positive experience.

                    • Re: Kindle to Nook - Three Weeks Later
                      RHWright

                      ConnieL4193 wrote:

                       As a secondary factor in wanting to try the Nook vs the Kindle was so I could also be a part of the "in store" experience.  In this area, I think Barnes and Noble could really step up their game and make it so compelling that I'd be running to the local B&N every other day (are you listening B&N?).


                      This is the feature/opportunity I've been banging the drum on for years now, as we go through each iteration of the Nook.

                       

                      B&N has a unique opportunity to capitalize on this synergy between online and B&M. Amazon doesn't have stores. Neither do Google, Sony, Kobo. The Apple stores are about hardware & service, not about content-driven decisions.

                       

                      B&N made baby steps early on (Read In-Store, pushing coupons to the device) but has never really capitalized effectively on the fact that having a NOOK is basically having a portable B&N store with you.

                       

                      The NOOKs (both HD/HD+ & NST/NST) should, with opt-in of course:

                       

                      • Start receiving in-store coupons again. (I may be wrong, but I haven't seen a coupon on my Nook in awhile. I believe they stopped. Time to start again.) It doesn't have to be free stuff, as it was before, but a coupon off something would be nice. Effective marketing too, if they tie it to specific buying habits.

                      • Be able to shop for non-digital content & have it shipped to you. I know you can do this via a browser and the regular site, but it should be "baked in" to the primary Nook Store interface to save time/trouble and boost sales.

                      • Be able to reserve items for in-store pick-up. See previous about browser v. baked-in.

                      • More easily find out about in-store events & promotions

                      • Accumulate "check-ins" at B&M stores for extra special offers; i.e.. the more you visit stores with your Nook, the better and more frequent offers will be

                      • Access a store map/layout

                       

                      I may be wrong. B&N may have date to back up an approach that seems to say there is little in-store engagement for Nook owners. But my gut says take more advantage of the special opportunity.

                       

                      • Re: Kindle to Nook - Three Weeks Later

                        Welcome to our side.  I own a first edition Nook, a Nook Color, and a Nook HD+.  I gotta say the HD+ is an impressive device.  So sad no one thinks to try one out before buying a Kindle or iPad or whatever tablet.  The interface is great, and with google play there is all kinds of competitiveness against other tablets.  I teach and our school has iPads that can be checked out as a class set.  So freakin annoying.  With the exception of not having a camera, my HD+ works so much smoother....for 1/3 the price.

                          • Re: Kindle to Nook - Three Weeks Later

                            You see iPads and the like in classrooms because Apple spefically targeted them and made them great deals to fill their classrooms with their products. Think about it, if the kids all learned on apple devices, that just might be their first choice when they go out to buy their own. Good thinking for Apple but not so much for the schools given that this is STILL a Microsoft world where most of the businesses run PC's for the most part. The kids get to learn on nice Apples but then have no idea how to use a computer that their employer actually has.  if they just put a little more thought into it, they'd realize that they can get far cheaper devices that can do just as much. Of course part of the blame has to go on all the other competitors.  Has B&N or Amazon for that matter considered supplying schools with devices complete with text books and/or software designed specifically for the teachers and students (Nook HD+) ? Now THERE'S a thought.