5 Replies Latest reply on Jun 28, 2012 9:10 AM by A_Wilson

    Iain M Banks "Culture" series broken in the middle

    Rock_River

      Here's weird: Iain M Banks' Culture SF novels are available as NookBooks... except for Excession and Inversions - which are in the middle of the series. That is, the first three, and the last three, are available, but the middle two are not (unless I want them in Spanish, which I don't). What's wrong with this picture?

        • Re: Iain M Banks "Culture" series broken in the middle
          MacMcK1957

          It's not just Barnes & Noble.  The same is true at Google, Sony Books, and Amazon.  Those two books (different publishers than the rest) are not available electronically except in Spanish translations.  Interesting.  Hope they get that fixed before I get that far in the series.

          • Re: Iain M Banks "Culture" series broken in the middle
            Doug_Pardee

            It appears to be about contracts. Different original publishers and different geographic distribution rights. Both Excession and Inversions are available in e-book form in the UK.

             

              • Re: Iain M Banks "Culture" series broken in the middle
                Rock_River

                Doug_Pardee wrote:

                It appears to be about contracts. Different original publishers and different geographic distribution rights. Both Excession and Inversions are available in e-book form in the UK.

                 


                Verrry Interrestink... Now, the ePub format isn't region-specific, right? So in theory I could buy the UK edition (or perhaps my brother, who lives in England, could buy it for me) and sideload it. Of course there's the DRM problem to get around, but it's something I can look into.

                 

                  • Re: Iain M Banks "Culture" series broken in the middle
                    A_Wilson

                    Rock_River wrote:

                    Doug_Pardee wrote:

                    It appears to be about contracts. Different original publishers and different geographic distribution rights. Both Excession and Inversions are available in e-book form in the UK.

                     


                    Verrry Interrestink... Now, the ePub format isn't region-specific, right? So in theory I could buy the UK edition (or perhaps my brother, who lives in England, could buy it for me) and sideload it. Of course there's the DRM problem to get around, but it's something I can look into.

                     


                    I don't know about others, but I have purchased a couple of ebooks using UK websites without issues.  They had DRM, but since I was able to use my CC and ID it wasn't an issue sideloading via Adobe Digital Editions. If you really want them I would give it a try.  Hope this helps.

                • Re: Iain M Banks "Culture" series broken in the middle
                  BrandieC

                  While not directly relevant to the OP, I discovered a similar issue with today's NOOK Daily Find, Rip Tide by Stella Rimington.  Rip Tide, according to the description on B&N, is the sixth book in Rimington's Liz Carlyle series.  Since I can't stand starting a series in the middle but this one sounded interesting, I checked FictFact for the full listing.  FictFact shows the fifth book as Present Danger.  My library has the preceding four books, as well as Rip Tide, so I checked the B&N site for Present Danger.  It's not available from B&N in any format.

                   

                  To make things curiouser, the Publishers Weekly review of Rip Tide and the "Meet the Author" blurb on B&N's product page both refer to Rip Tide as being the fifth in the Liz Carlyle series, which would explain why my library myseriously doesn't have it.  Nevertheless, in addition to being listed by both FictFact and Wikipedia as a Liz Carlyle book, its description on Amazon describes the plot as involving Liz Carlyle.

                   

                  It doesn't seem like this type of series "hole" is explained by different publishers, as the other books in the series appear to have been published by the same two publishers.  Short of buying a DTB from Amazon, does anyone have any other thoughts about an explanation that will satisfy my obsessive-compulsive imperative to read all preceding books in the series before starting Rip Tide?